Question Moving my 29 gallon tank

Utar

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I have a 29 gallon tank that is still setup in my old house for over two years, that I need to move to my new house. The move is only about 150 feet or so because I own both houses and the land they set on. I don't have much in the way of livestock in the tank seven corys, three danios, nerite back racing snail, and a hill stream loach.

I have two questions here:
1. Putting the livestock in a bucket then draining the entire tank for the move will I loose the cycle on the tank. I have two HOB's an AC50 and a cheep walmart brand. Both full of ceramic media with sponges and also a double sponge filter.
2. This is dealing with my algae eating snail and hill stream loach. I have a new second 29 gallon tank that I would like to use because the old one has a small leak at the very top. But in doing so I will loose all the natural algae that has built up over time in the old tank feeding these guys.

Thanks Everyone
 

SanDiegoRedneck

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Utar said:
I have a 29 gallon tank that is still setup in my old house for over two years, that I need to move to my new house. The move is only about 150 feet or so because I own both houses and the land they set on. I don't have much in the way of livestock in the tank seven corys, three danios, nerite back racing snail, and a hill stream loach.

I have two questions here:
1. Putting the livestock in a bucket then draining the entire tank for the move will I loose the cycle on the tank. I have two HOB's an AC50 and a cheep walmart brand. Both full of ceramic media with sponges and also a double sponge filter.
2. This is dealing with my algae eating snail and hill stream loach. I have a new second 29 gallon tank that I would like to use because the old one has a small leak at the very top. But in doing so I will loose all the natural algae that has built up over time in the old tank feeding these guys.

Thanks Everyone
If you move old gunked up filters to new tank you should have no problem.
 
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Utar

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SanDiegoRedneck said:
If you move old gunked up filters to new tank you should have no problem.
Thanks for the reply
I am sure the BB in the media will survive the move, but just hoping I want experience an ammonia spike in the new setup after the move. I also worry about my snail and hill stream loach not surviving because the new tank will have no algae for them to eat. So I might setup both tanks the new one and re-setup the old one for the two of them to stay until the new tank ages enough for algae.
 

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That sounds like a lot of extra work, maintaining two tanks for months. Instead, grow your own algae! Before the move, put out a bucket with some driftwood or something in it. Put it in direct sunlight. You’ll have algae super quick. Then just swap out decoration pieces. One algae-filled goes in the tank, one clean one comes out! Or you can use two or three, however much food you think they’ll need while the new batch grows.
Set up the new tank and add all the fish, substrate, filters, decorations, everything goes into the new tank. You won’t see an ammonia spike, no worries. I do prefer to keep 50% of the old water though for my own peace of mind.
 
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Utar

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UnknownUser said:
That sounds like a lot of extra work, maintaining two tanks for months. Instead, grow your own algae! Before the move, put out a bucket with some driftwood or something in it. Put it in direct sunlight. You’ll have algae super quick. Then just swap out decoration pieces. One algae-filled goes in the tank, one clean one comes out! Or you can use two or three, however much food you think they’ll need while the new batch grows.
Set up the new tank and add all the fish, substrate, filters, decorations, everything goes into the new tank. You won’t see an ammonia spike, no worries. I do prefer to keep 50% of the old water though for my own peace of mind.
A big thanks for this. Didn't even cross my mind about making my own algae. I have plenty of drift wood lying around and have been boiling some for several days now.
 

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i actually did this like 6 months ago when i was using the 37. put fish in buckets. i didnt have plants at the time but put filters in another bucket. and once i got my tank back up and running . nothing was stalled as far as cycles. put put some small decor that has BB onit in with the fish to maybe maintain any poop they will be doing . pretty sure they freak out and just go to town on poop during things like this
 
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Nickguy5467 said:
i actually did this like 6 months ago when i was using the 37. put fish in buckets. i didnt have plants at the time but put filters in another bucket. and once i got my tank back up and running . nothing was stalled as far as cycles. put put some small decor that has BB onit in with the fish to maybe maintain any poop they will be doing . pretty sure they freak out and just go to town on poop during things like this
That makes me feel better to hear someone else has moved their aquarium like I am about to do. The big problem with my old 29 gallon setup is the black diatoms that took over the tank, I have some really large amazon swords and an anubis plant that I am going to have throw out, because they are covered with the stuff. I have been wanting to start all over anyway because of these black messy diatoms that just want go away. The only thing I am reusing is the media and the HOBs and heater, the rest the rest I am throwing away.
 

Nickguy5467

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Utar said:
That makes me feel better to hear someone else has moved their aquarium like I am about to do. The big problem with my old 29 gallon setup is the black diatoms that took over the tank, I have some really large amazon swords and an anubis plant that I am going to have throw out, because they are covered with the stuff. I have been wanting to start all over anyway because of these black messy diatoms that just want go away. The only thing I am reusing is the media and the HOBs and heater, the rest the rest I am throwing away.
so. gonna be a new tank generally? thats not bad. you might have a mini cycling issue like i did when i switched from my 37 to a 29 because my 37 had a leak. i used the same substrate same filters. but i still had to re cycle my tank. but it only took like a week. i guess it was what they call a mini cycle? wait thats wrong sorta of. i used the same sand. but the potting soil was new
 

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Nickguy5467 said:
so. gonna be a new tank generally? thats not bad. you might have a mini cycling issue like i did when i switched from my 37 to a 29 because my 37 had a leak. i used the same substrate same filters. but i still had to re cycle my tank. but it only took like a week. i guess it was what they call a mini cycle? wait thats wrong sorta of. i used the same sand. but the potting soil was new
You probably had a mini cycle because you went from a larger tank to a smaller tank, which means your bioload actually increased even though you had the same fish.

I have moved my 10 gallon tank 3 times now (to and from college) and then upgraded it to a 20 gal (and changed the substrate to something new) without ever having a stalled cycle, mini cycle, ammonia spike or any of that. I run extra filtration (a hob twice the size of the tank and a sponge filter) and the bb on it grows to match the amount of fish. So if you aren’t downgrading tank size and you aren’t adding new fish, you’ll be completely fine. Just make sure your filter media stays wet.

glad to hear you like the growing your own algae trick :) i’m sad that you are tossing the plants — diatoms wipe off so easily! Take a paper towel to the sword and it’ll be fine! If you have a diatom problem, you could think of getting nerite snails. They LOVE diatoms. 2 in my 10 gal cleaned my whole tank in one night. Besides the clean up crew, an algae problem is a result of too much light or too little nutrients. Do you use liquid ferts or co2? How many plants do you have? Cutting down on the lighting time should prevent this from happening again in your new tank.
 
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Utar

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UnknownUser said:
You probably had a mini cycle because you went from a larger tank to a smaller tank, which means your bioload actually increased even though you had the same fish.

I have moved my 10 gallon tank 3 times now (to and from college) and then upgraded it to a 20 gal (and changed the substrate to something new) without ever having a stalled cycle, mini cycle, ammonia spike or any of that. I run extra filtration (a hob twice the size of the tank and a sponge filter) and the bb on it grows to match the amount of fish. So if you aren’t downgrading tank size and you aren’t adding new fish, you’ll be completely fine. Just make sure your filter media stays wet.

glad to hear you like the growing your own algae trick :) i’m sad that you are tossing the plants — diatoms wipe off so easily! Take a paper towel to the sword and it’ll be fine! If you have a diatom problem, you could think of getting nerite snails. They LOVE diatoms. 2 in my 10 gal cleaned my whole tank in one night. Besides the clean up crew, an algae problem is a result of too much light or too little nutrients. Do you use liquid ferts or co2? How many plants do you have? Cutting down on the lighting time should prevent this from happening again in your new tank.
I don't have a co2 setup in my tanks. I could cut back on the light because it is on a timer staying on for eight hours a day, but the tank is near a window.

I have tried radical approaches in the past to clear the tank of diatoms. I took everything ornament wise out and scrubbed them clean. I took the plants out cleaning them off and the really bad leaves I cut them off. I had it cleaned of diatoms and within a few months the diatoms where back covering everything in the tank.

I bought three nerite snails, but had bad luck with them for some reason. I put them in the tank and they just laid there. A few days later they still had not moved. So I took them out and could clearly see they had died. I then bought my first black racer nerite snail and it found its way out of the tank, I found it on the floor behind the tank a day after the fact and of course it was dead. So I bought a second nerite racer and he did great, stayed in the tank and I have him today, he is a great snail. I also bought two hill stream loaches that eat algae, one died but the other is still alive over a year later. That's as far as I have ever gotten purchasing algae eaters from my tank.

I could try again cleaning the leaves off the plants and re-home them into the new aquarium, but I really don't want to take a chance of carrying over diatoms.
 

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