Moving a tank

  1. Ken R Initiate Member

    Hello, thank you for this site. I'll be moving a 60gal reef tank into another tank so I can remove the smaller 60gal tank into a 180gal tank. Doesn't sound clear does it :) basically need to move my current tank to place a larger tank in the same place, can't do that without brakeing down the current tank. So....my question is, can I move all my LR/coral and fish into a new tank that only has salt water in it? Does my temporary tank that's going to be home for my corals/fish while my new tank cycles need to go though a cycle or is it good to go? Thanks so much.
     
  2. claireputput Well Known Member Member

    Hi, I am going through this as we speak. I bought a tank today and tomorrow (too tired after the long drive today) we will place fish in buckets with current water and save as much of the water as we can using buckets. We will place the sand and rock in buckets as well-covered in water.
    Once the tank is mostly empty, we will move some ( a small amount into the new tank as we move it on the tiled floor (it should scoot).
    Then we will move that one out, place the new one and begin to rehook up the sump. Once that is finished all rock from buckets will go back in tank and fish will go in last.
    I do have air stones for the buckets that I will have running in the three fish buckets (we bought 12 buckets and I have 4 five gallon buckets).
    Good luck with your project.
    I am moving from a 90g to a 120g and plan on a straight move. 1971roadrunner or ryanr both have much more experience with this then I do and either of them can let you know whether to expect a cycle.
    Good luck! :)
     

  3. 1971roadrunner Well Known Member Member

    Hi, and welcome to Fishlore :). You post is a little confusing so if I'm wrong about something-sorry? Any time you move one tank in place of the other there is the possibility that the new set up will go through some sort of cycle. Try to get the water's PH, sg and temp as close as you can get it and be ready to do WC's to be ready and maybe some ammonia removing resin or something like it. I don't know if your using sand (or a DSB which would complicate things) but I would use 1/3 (or less) the sand from your old system only 'cause if you move too much old sand, critters and detritus from your old system you would be pushing the new system closer to a re-cycle. Try to keep the older tank 1/2 full or so during the switch to keep your things in there and move them over slowly and clean them off while doing so.

    *in regards to the FISH, I would acclimate them to the new system (I always drip acclimate).

    **btw, I don't keep coral etc.. run fowlr's only so wont comment on acclimating them without having had personal experience with that myself. maybe someone else who does will chime in or rely on your own research. ttyl
     

  4. fishingdeep Member Member

    Welcome to Fishlore Ken R ! Thanks for the post. It really doesn't matter if you have SW or FW, you have to cycle the tank. The water column doesn't contain enough bb to cycle your tank so you need to have established filtration since this is a late window before the move. You are really having a new tank and it has to cycle and now you have to adjust to that with the coral and the fish. I wish you have asked earlier so we could have helped to avoid the issues that you are going to face. So back to your post:
    can I move all my LR/coral and fish into a new tank that only has salt water in it? Yes you can, but no you shouldn't ........ never works out good .....
     

  5. 1971roadrunner Well Known Member Member

    With all due respect - that's not correct. In a SW aquarium the LR with powerheads blowing water directed at it IS in large part the filtration. You need the LR in there to continue with cycling or lose most of the BB that's filtering the tank.
     
  6. fishingdeep Member Member

    @1971, I never disagreed with you with all due respect. I only made a post of " cycle ", power heads aren't even the issue. When was the last time water flow was the issue in the "cycle ", maybe I wasn't the one to " chime in " but I did. Enjoy your post, but it isn't about the original post ... you can PM me. From what I see from the post will involve a cycle and it never will be a " new thing " when you add additional fish. Owning fish will always involve the " cycle ", weather it is SW or FW
     
  7. ryanr Moderator Moderator Member

    :;du I think there's been some confusion, let's all play nice.

    Hi Ken, welcome to Fishlore :;hi2
    Moving tanks is always a bit of a difficult job, especially if you're new tank is going where the current one is.

    You are correct, you need to break down your existing tank.

    My approach, depends how many buckets you have, or you could get a Rubbermaid tub or similar, in fact, the Rubbermaid tub would be a good idea.

    I'd have the extra 100 odd gallons you'll need already mixed to current salinity, temperature etc. Be sure to match salinity exactly.

    You're going to want a friend to help ;)

    Setup the tub away from your work area, and start moving water from the current tank to the tub.
    Once you get enough water in the tub, start moving the rock to the tub. And any corals you have.
    Move the fish and inverts.
    Remove the rest of the water to the tub, or buckets.

    If you think it's going to take awhile to setup the new one, put the powerheads and heaters in the tub to keep some circulation and heat.

    Move the current tank away.
    Move the new tank in and setup plumbing etc.
    Setup base layer of rock.
    Gently move the sand from the current tank to the new tank, trying not to disturb it too much.
    Start moving water back to new tank.
    Move the rest of the rocks and corals.
    Move the fish and inverts.
    Move rest of water back and top up.

    Setup your equipment.

    Your tank shouldn't go through another cycle as long as you don't add a heap of new uncured liverock: same as moving media from one filter to another. But have some Prime on hand just in case.

    Hope that gives you a bit of an idea.