Molly Illness help please

  1. JoFish Initiate Member

    I have a black balloon molly. She has developed white growths all over, not resembling ICK. Like the fish beginner I am I treated it for ICK for a few days. Obviously it didn't work. Now she has developed a swollen left eye as well. I went out and bought the API freshwater master test kit today due to the advice of others. I got a reading of PH-7.6, Ammonia- 0 ppm, Nitrite- 0 ppm, and Nitrate- between the highest of the two readings (80-160ppm). Could this high nitrate level have caused this? I did a 20% water change yesterday and only after that did the swollen eye come about... No behavior change, she is still swimming fine, eating fine, etc. She is also in a 10 gallon quarentine tank alone at the moment. Could this cause stress? I really would like to put her back in my main tank but I am afraid this could spread to the rest of my fish. I am posting the best picture I could capture. Thanks all. FIshie.jpg
     
  2. Wendy Lubianetsky Well Known Member Member

    Welcome to Fishlore

    The nitrate reading you have is totally unacceptable for fish. Nitrate reading should be 20 ppm, no higher than 40 ppm. This is undoubtably what is making your fish sick. You need to immediately do 50-60 % water change and then turn around an do it again. Then, retest your water. If your reading is not below 20, do it again and keep doing it until your reading is below 20 ppm.

    Your fish can't fight illness being so stressed out from the water. Hopefully the fresh water will take care of the problem. If not, you may have to still treat them. The water change will take everything into the right direction.
     

  3. jdhef Moderator Moderator Member

    While I agree with Wendy that you need to start doing some water changes to lower those nitrates, I do have to disagree with the size of the water changes. Assuming your tap water contains 0ppm nitrate, a 50% water chage would drop your nitrates in half instantly. I fear that will be too drastic of a change for the fish (unlike high ammonia or nitrite that you want to lower ASAP). So I would start doing daily 20% water changes until you get those nitrates down. Then just go to weekly 30%-50% water changes from there on in.

    Also I see in your Aquarium Info it states that you are unaware of the nitrogen cycle. Please read up on it as it is the most important thing to understand when keeping fish.
     

  4. bowcrazy Well Known Member Member

    One thing to remember, when doing the Nitrate testing you need to really bang the tar out the of bottle number 2 for a full minute or longer. The crystals in the solution need to be broken up and responded into the solution and this can only be done by banging it around for a while. A simple shake for 10 seconds will not do it. Also you should test your local tap water for Nitrates. My local water tests high in nitrates so I have to do some pre-treating to lower it before doing water changes or my nitrates will not get below 40.

    If your tap water tests OK you then should do some back to back large water changes to help lower the Nitrate level in the tank. Doing a 50% water change with Nitrate free tap water will lower the nitrate level in the tank by half but if your tap water has any nitrates it will not lower it by 50%. The white spots could be a fungus or ich which can both be caused by poor water quality.