Mixing mbuna and peacocks

Fisharewet

I'm planning a mostly mbuna cichlid tank but there is one peacock cichlid that I really like and was wondering if it was compatible with the mbuna. The peacock is a raspberry cichlid, and the mbuna im getting are about the same size as the raspberry cichlid.
 

Joshaeus

I'm no expert on African cichlids, but most mbuna are partially herbivorous and vulnerable to getting bloat if fed too much protein, while peacocks are strictly carnivorous; also, most mbuna are far more aggressive than most peacocks. I would wait for more opinions from those with more experience with these cichlids, but I personally would be wary of mixing a peacock with most mbuna species.
 

MacZ

Just leave it. Peacocks and haps mainly feed on crustaceans, plankton and small fish, Mbuna are aufwuchs eaters (algae, biofilms, infusoria growing on surfaces). That said: Let algae (except cyanobacteria) grow in your tank.

You can kill Mbuna with most protein rich foods, bloodworms e.g. are a killer.
Aulonocara on the other hand are rather weakened if only fed the more herbivorous foods designed for Mbuna.

Some people keep them together using only dried foods, which in my opinion is rather a bad compromise. Most dry foods contain unhealthy amounts of grains and starches (leading to fat liver which is fatal) and low grade fishmeal (containing prions, which can cause emaciating and degenerative syndromes).
 

SparkyJones

Peacocks are technically omnivores, but are predatory so yes, their diet is animal protein heavy, but they aren't picky and will eat algae and heck even lettuce and peas and plants given the opportunity. They aren't like the carnivores that simply won't touch anything that's not a meat, definitely omnivore they are designed to digest plant also.

However either the mbuna or the peacock will suffer from the diet of the other, and most likely the mbuna, like all those animal proteins are a problem for the mbuna, and they will eat too much of it trying to feed the peacock, the peacock will eat whatever basically, but prefers the meaty stuff, it should do fine either way but might suffer if given only the diet of the mbuna, smaller size weaker color, lighter weight and not reach full potential. Ideally you pick one or the other, mbuna or peacock, so you don't run into this issue because either you'll have dead mbuna from the peacock diet, or undersized and poor looking peacocks from the mbuna diet, neither of which are ideal outcomes.

And yeah as MacZ said, the dry foods will work for both, but it won't get you top condition, full sized long lived fish doing it., Too much useless fillers, and even the fishmeal is technically a problem for the mbuna long term, plenty of studies with chickens and fish farms, feeding them fishmeal instead of poultry byproduct meal, turns out the poultry byproduct meal, is better for the chickens and the fish, than the fishmeal darkening of skin, retinal degeneration, wasting disease, just a whole lot of problems with fishmeal.


It's not so much the fishmeal itself, it's the processing into a food that's the problem, and it's nutritional value, in a lot of cases it's a low percentage of fishmeal in the foods, and it needs to be really high not low, AND supplemented for what it's lacking nutritionally for specific species, there's not a one size fits all fishfood.
Like fishmeal, it's deficient in vitamin B2, Niacin, B1, B6, Ascorbic Acid, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin C, I can really go on the list is a long one, but those ones right there, if fed only that diet, leads to deformities from the deficiency, anorexia, poor growth, scale loss or fin hemorrhage, poor reproduction and poor offspring.

And on that note, I just realized a whole heck of a lot of problems posted on this site day in and day out by people about their fish and a health issues,,,,, It's most likely source/cause of the problems are dietary needs not being met and deficiencies.

I really need to stop writing books on here, it's a forum, not a blog!. hahahaha, I get going and next thing I know it's heading towards a novel being written.
 

MacZ

I really need to stop writing books on here, it's a forum, not a blog!. hahahaha, I get going and next thing I know it's heading towards a novel being written.
We should maybe start a blog with 1-2 other people on here, though. :D
And on that note, I just realized a whole heck of a lot of problems posted on this site day in and day out by people about their fish and a health issues,,,,, It's most likely source/cause of the problems are dietary needs not being met and deficiencies.
Ignorance of water chemistry, dietary needs and correct aquarium hygiene together kill more fish than any parasite or disease.
 

A201

It's possible to keep Mbuna & Aulonocara together in an African Rift lake community, but it really isn't a good idea.
Mbuna in general don't readily get along with each other. Adding another territorial aggressive species like a Peacock to the mix just compounds the problems.
I've had realative success keeping a community of Mbuna, Haps & Aulonocara. Although there were periods of time when things looked great, there were also times where it was total chaos.
Despite having a great deal of experience keeping a vast variety of aquarium fish, my mixed African Rift community was by far the most frustrating & difficult to maintain.
 

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