Metronidazole To Treat Fish

BeanFish

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I am getting another tank, a 180 lt tank (hopefully this is not the start of Multiple tank syndrome...) to move my 2 Mollys to it and leave their current house (a 10 gal tank) to 5 dwarf corydoras in the hopes that they will start breeding.
So, as tank mates for the 180lt I am getting a school of tiger barbs! I have 4 in a QT tank and tomorrow I am gonna get 2-3 more to complete their school.
A girl at one of the many fish stores in the city told me about metronidazole to medicate fish in quarantine. So, I am just wondering, what are your experiences with metronidazole? I heard it can treat some internal parasites as well as some external parasites, is this true? Would metronidazole be good enough to make sure I am not starting an illness tank instead of a fish tank?
 
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BeanFish

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Lol!! I am sure my parents will keep it at bay until I get a house or something.
They are scared I am gonna turn our big yard into a fish farm lol.
I am starting to wonder if I posted this is in the wrong section.
I am going tomorrow for 2-3 more tigerbarbs to get the full school and I think I am also gonna go with a biologist that has been keeping fish for 35 years to ask his opinion about metronidazole so I may post the info he will give me on here.
I am still curious about your experiences.
 

CarrieFisher

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Ive read two schools of thought on this

A.) Treat new fish with meds, regardless of shown symptoms, to introduce "treated" fish to show tank. (As a preventative)

B.) Just Q for a full 90 days and sparingly treat for only whatever actually presents itself. So as to not put unecessary chems on/in them and/or build resistance to some of these meds.

I think one of the safest combos of the above two schools of thought, a "best of both worlds" scenario, might be to Q for at least a month and a half and dose Q tank with ParaGuard?

I'm new, so others should weigh in here on my theory
 

iZaO Jnr

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I am getting another tank, a 180 lt tank (hopefully this is not the start of Multiple tank syndrome...) to move my 2 Mollys to it and leave their current house (a 10 gal tank) to 5 dwarf corydoras in the hopes that they will start breeding.
So, as tank mates for the 180lt I am getting a school of tiger barbs! I have 4 in a QT tank and tomorrow I am gonna get 2-3 more to complete their school.
A girl at one of the many fish stores in the city told me about metronidazole to medicate fish in quarantine. So, I am just wondering, what are your experiences with metronidazole? I heard it can treat some internal parasites as well as some external parasites, is this true? Would metronidazole be good enough to make sure I am not starting an illness tank instead of a fish tank?
Metranidazole is a generic form of antiprotozoal substance that is not only used in aquariums. It is a worldwide "drug" used to treat nematode and protozoan (primarily) infections in humans and other livestock.

This drug is just about as effective as it gets in treating internal parasitic infections. To put the cherry on the cake, it has very little to no effect on bacterial infections (which means it won't affect your beneficial cultures either. However, I still tend to err on the side of this: Are your fish infected? No? Are they showing symptoms? No?... Then I see no reasoning in spending the money and subjecting the fish to any treatment, given there is no reason to expose the fish to unnecessary compounds, as well as that extra spend of well-earned cash. This is yet another reason why proper quarantine practice is so important - should issues arise you can observe, isolate and treat accordingly. That being said, a very handy one to keep on hand!

PS: Masters in Botany and Microbiology - Extensive studies on parasitology
 

CarrieFisher

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Sidenote to @iZaO Jnr's (and in agreement with the) point:
Many of these fish meds are the same thing as human antibiotics, but in smaller doses.
I imagine if you treat needlessly and often enough, they could build resistance to meds, and they wont be nearky as effdctive for when they really do *need* them.
 

iZaO Jnr

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I imagine if you treat needlessly and often enough, they could build resistance to meds, and they wont be nearky as effdctive for when they really do *need* them.
Precisely this. Lets try to keep this drug as effective as they are now.
 

CarrieFisher

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I'm never going to get used to this new tablet's keyboard!!
Sorry about all of the typos, I painstakingly proofread *this* post


Confession: I'm a little bit of an urban prepper and I found this fascinating wayyyy before my interest in fishkeeping grew to this point.
 

NavigatorBlack

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I run 40 tanks and breed uncommon fish - I do not have access to over the counter antibiotics where I live, and don't miss them. They are banned without a veterinary prescription. We thought all our fish would die when the law passed, and nothing changed. 95% of the time, we misuse antibiotics in aquariums.
I actually look in the opposite direction - commercial fishfarms in Asia are said to use large amounts of antibiotics to force growth, maintain crowding and get fish to market. It may be coincidence, but those industrial production practices developed right around when our hobby became obsessed with bloat and swim bladder issues in non herbivorous fish. Before that, plant eaters fed low fiber food were known to have problems, but now, we see so many postings about new Bettas (insect eaters by trade) bloating, I wonder if we are receiving fish with disrupted gut flora and fauna.
I have never had bloating issues like I read of here with wild caught, unfarmed fish.

There's a guy doing youtube videos calling for zapping new arrivals with antibiotics, and he has a huge following. He's very confident and a good salesman, but I think he's dead wrong. I've never dosed a fish without a strong suspicion I knew what I was dosing for. Antibiotics are precious tools, and we should not be cultivating resistant bacterial strains by throwing them in fishtanks for no defined reason.

So I would quarantine in a large, filtered and cycled tank - large enough for the fish to live its life in. I'd use clean water, not medicated.

If you are planning for the zombies, check the expiration dates on meds. When our laws originally changed, I thought I should stock up from US pet stores while visiting. I found antibiotics 4 or 5 years after their expiration, often with price tags over the dates. I always read packaging carefully.
 
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BeanFish

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I live in Mexico so I do not think I will have problem getting the meds.
You guys share pretty interesting thoughts.
I was thinking about just leaving them in the QT tank for a month and only medicate if something arise, like ich for example. But how would I know if they have internal parasites?
Oh, and that salesman that uploads daily videos to youtube, that is where I got the idea of medicating them just in case lol.

I do not know, my inner paranoic dude tells me to medicate them just in case they have something inside of them, and that girl at the LFS told me the anti-biotic is pretty safe.
The 4 tiger barbs I got were from a reputable source, they stayed at the reputable source for 3 weeks or more, so I am almost 100% sure they have nothing but the other 2-3 barbs I am gonna get from that fish store are gonna come right from the farm, the guy just got them and I am not sure if they will carry something or not.

So, basically, I am worried about internal parasites and I just want to be sure my fish live a happy life without any parasites inside them, should I give them metradinazole? Is there any way I can confirm they have internal parasites before medicating?

Oh, on a side note, my parents gave me the full yard for my fish lab (they only want glass tanks with cool aquascapes in the house) so I guess this MTS is gonna go nuts, I just need to get a half time job because right now my fish adventure is running on christmas money lol.
 
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BeanFish

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Ok guys, I talked with that biologist and he also agrees with your points of view. If the fish looks good he is ok and can be introduced after the quarantine month.
I now understand, meds are not as cheap as I thought and medication puts stress in healthy fish.
I think I am gonna leave the tiger barbs alone, I am gonna watch their poop (the QT tank is bare bottom so they are easy to see) and of course I am gonna look for external parasites, if after a month I do not see anything then I will add them to the tank.
He also thinks that if I start medicating like that I am gonna face resistan virus, so yeah, I think the "only medicate when you see an illness method" is better.
Thanks for all your posts!
 
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