Male Bettas In The Same Tank??

christoglendon
  • #1
Hey there! I’m new to this, still figuring out how this sight works. I have a question about betta fish. I have two male crowntails who have shared a tank for a little over five months that has a divider in it. Is there a possibility they could live without the divider? Should I attempt to let them be in the same water? Or will they kill each other. I have heard females can share a tank with one another. Another question I had was what fish can be tank partners with (male or female betta). Thank you!


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This is my fish’!
 
luckdown
  • #2
Male bettas should not be housed together (divided tanks are fine) you can however house females together as long as there's a min of 3 bettas in at least a 20 gallon long with lots of plants. (Odd numbers of bettas are better for some reason)

I have one of my male bettas in with some Platies though most people will suggest only keeping them with snails or shrimp. You definitely don't want to house them with guppies as they'll confuse them for another betta and fight them

As a rule of thumb only house them with dull colored peaceful fish that can fit in the size tank you have them in.

I heard cories are good tank mates for them but they like to school so you'll need 6 of them at least. I'm going to be adding them to my tank next time I visit the let store (which may be soon) so I can let you know how that goes if you'd like?


But honestly what you can keep them with depends entirely on your fishs personality. Each fish is different. I have another male betta I wouldn't trust with any other living thing cuz he's too spazzy and aggressive.
 
david1978
  • #3
What size tank? The answer probably is they more than likely they will kill each other in that size tank. Sororities are recommended in a 20 gallon long minimum with atleast 5 girls to spread out agression.

2 males can be done I proved that but I wouldn't attempt it in anything smaller than a 4 foot tank.
 
luckdown
  • #4
2 males can be done I proved that but I wouldn't attempt it in anything smaller than a 4 foot tank.
Don't wanna take over the op's thread but I feel the need to say how impressed I am with your betta tank <3 life goals right there omg extremely impressed with that especially with how long they've been fine for. Not gonna lie I've bragged about you to friends lol
 
InsanityShard
  • #5
That is too much food! Waaay too much food! Their stomachs tend to be around the size of their eyes... I wouldn't go higher than 4 pellets that size (assuming they already puffed up in the water) though if you're using that for ammonia to feed bacteria, put it where they can't eat it. >_>
 
david1978
  • #6
Thanks. I started with 4 girls and 1 boy and it fasinated me so much it was like how far can I take this. Every addition after that was thought out long and hard. I hope op doesn't mind I will offer any help I can.
 
sfsamm
  • #7
I agree that housing betta males with other fish can be possible depending on the personality of the individual betta. I have two males, one is a fin nipper who shows absolutely no interest in people and is completely passive to other fish and snails... He is fascinated by his cherry shrimp mates, and I'm pretty sure he snacks on shrimplets and helps keep platy fry in check... But I can put him in any of my tanks that won't eat him even in with my endler-guppy frat boys and he defends a little turf when necessary but otherwise is completely not aggressive or interested in his mates.

My other betta though... He deserves a scythe all his own. He's a murderous little fellow. He eats nerite antenna and constantly harassed them to the point I removed the snails as they wouldn't leave the shell anymore. He cleaned his own tank of pest pond snails, brutally attacked a mystery snail and even jumped out of his tank trying to get to the other betta during a water change when I removed the magazine between the tanks. Tried him in a heavily planted 20 with a small group of CPDs and he harassed and chased and tried to kill them also constantly and was removed after a few hours when it was evident he was relentless. He's now in a nice Fishless corner all his own where he can't see any other living aquatic animals. He's extremely friendly and swims straight into my hand if I cup it and pets himself on my hands if I'm in his tank. Follows every move I make when I'm near his tank and has quite a personality.

I have two boys on the very opposite ends of the spectrum, and I've had all varieties in between over the years. And just because something works for a few days or weeks does not mean that it will work permanently, especially so with male betta. They get a burr in their saddle over something and that's it. So always proceed with caution and always keep an eye on what they're up to.
 
Mithe
  • #8
I have a Betta living with Cories and Tetra right now. At first, the initial hour or two, he was very territorial. He pursued any fish that passed by as he scoped out the tank. Now, he swims along side them and doesn't seem to care, even if they bump into him. However, two male bettas is really hard and unlikely to work.

Side note: I noticed at PetCo, they tried a new sales tactic of housing Betta in community tanks. I don't know if they did this to try and prove they can live in communities. It was odd. I visited one day and suddenly they had bettas in several tanks (only one per tank) with new tags. Risky move, but maybe it helps sales and that's all they really care about
 
MaximumRide14
  • #9
No, do not remove the divider. Second of all, that’s way too much food. They only need two or three daily, and it’s best to fast them one day a week too.
 
Kamaile
  • #10
I have a few comments.

The first and simplest is that you're feeding way too much. Your bettas only need one of those pellets one or two times a day.

Also, bettas are very territorial and will be stressed as long as they can see each other. They will constantly be feeling as though their territory is threatened, and I don't feel as though that is healthy.

I would also comment that, while it's SOMETIMES possible to house male bettas together, you need much more experience and space. You would need a very long wall devoted entirely to one tank with females vastly outnumbering the two males. The tank would also need to be densely planted, and there's still no guarantee they wouldn't kill each other.
 
FishLoverEmma0
  • #11
Hey there! I’m new to this, still figuring out how this sight works. I have a question about betta fish. I have two male crowntails who have shared a tank for a little over five months that has a divider in it. Is there a possibility they could live without the divider? Should I attempt to let them be in the same water? Or will they kill each other. I have heard females can share a tank with one another. Another question I had was what fish can be tank partners with (male or female betta). Thank you!

View attachment 421853View attachment 421854View attachment 421855

This is my fish’!
I have had a rather good experience with bettas! I have been able to house 2 females and one male together with a lot of other community fish in a lightly planted 5 gal and they were just fine. Males should not live together but depending on the traits of your bettas, like if they are aggressive or sometimes very peaceful, it might work out. If they fight as soon as the divider comes out, you should put it back.
 
Mcasella
  • #12
Most bettas are in the spectrum of no other bettas/fish. I have four females right now (they are separated out because they don't like each other), all four are fine with guppies, swordtails. the largest female will eat deformed guppies, but doesn't both healthy guppies, they do not get along with other betta though. I have a male that is named Fury because he is a little orange ball of rage at anything that resembles a betta (fine with people, he wiggles when you look in and swims over when you call Fury).
I have had betta that are fine with other fish and bettas, my original "sorority" turned out to be four males and one female, they lived together peacefully for 6 months before I added a new female and Blueberry decided he was the dominant male and beat the other males (killed one, one had almost no fins left). (This was several years ago at this point, blueberry lived a good 1.5+ years with me without issue.) Blueberry was my favored male, he got along with just about anything as long as a viable female wasn't smelled/around.
However it is not safe most of the time to try and place them together, they can be unpredictable and violent. They can and will kill others bettas specially if they feel their territory has been invaded. If you do try you need a long tank for them to be able to get away from each other, and sometimes that isn't enough either.
 
Fanatic
  • #13
You can most definitely do more than one male, it's not recommended to anyone unless they know what they are doing.
I saw a tutorial on YouTube showing you how to introduce multiple males to your tank, and this person did it in a heavily planted 30 gallon.
 
Hunter1
  • #14
Corys work well with a male betta.
 
Annie's bettas
  • #15
Male bettas should not be housed together (divided tanks are fine) you can however house females together as long as there's a min of 3 bettas in at least a 20 gallon long with lots of plants. (Odd numbers of bettas are better for some reason)

I have one of my male bettas in with some Platies though most people will suggest only keeping them with snails or shrimp. You definitely don't want to house them with guppies as they'll confuse them for another betta and fight them

As a rule of thumb only house them with dull colored peaceful fish that can fit in the size tank you have them in.

I heard cories are good tank mates for them but they like to school so you'll need 6 of them at least. I'm going to be adding them to my tank next time I visit the let store (which may be soon) so I can let you know how that goes if you'd like?


But honestly what you can keep them with depends entirely on your fishs personality. Each fish is different. I have another male betta I wouldn't trust with any other living thing cuz he's too spazzy and aggressive.
Odd numbers are best so that if say there were only two, they could compete for dominance, while with 3 it would be harder to do( I don't remember the details) Lol!

I have a few comments.

The first and simplest is that you're feeding way too much. Your bettas only need one of those pellets one or two times a day.

Also, bettas are very territorial and will be stressed as long as they can see each other. They will constantly be feeling as though their territory is threatened, and I don't feel as though that is healthy.

I would also comment that, while it's SOMETIMES possible to house male bettas together, you need much more experience and space. You would need a very long wall devoted entirely to one tank with females vastly outnumbering the two males. The tank would also need to be densely planted, and there's still no guarantee they wouldn't kill each other.
With all due respect, one or two pellets a day is a little too small of an amount. I would recommend 4 twice a day. Although, each betta is different and get fat with that many, and some are happy with 2 pellets a day. It depends.
 
Iverg1
  • #16
Hello! Like everyone else has said do not remove the divider. Bettas can be housed together but only if the tank is REALLY big and HEAVILY planted. I don't know what size tank you have but for tank mates you can have a nerite snail or some shrimp And it all depends on the temperament of your betta. Some may be fine with a few tank mates other may attack and finally please only feed 2-3 pellets as too much can get your betta bloated
 

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