Maintaining PH

Tallen78

Hey y’all,I’m looking into some shell dwellers for a 55g.It is said they need a PH of 7.6-8.0.My tap is neutral and drops to around 6.8 after its degassed.What is the best method of raising and maintaining PH.I don’t want to use any chemicals I want a set it and forget it kinda thing.
 

mimo91088

A bag of crushed coral in your HOB. You'll have to replace it, but we're talking a couple times a year at most. So not exactly "set it and forget it" but not labor intensive by any means.
 
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RayClem

Hey y’all,I’m looking into some shell dwellers for a 55g.It is said they need a PH of 7.6-8.0.My tap is neutral and drops to around 6.8 after its degassed.What is the best method of raising and maintaining PH.I don’t want to use any chemicals I want a set it and forget it kinda thing.

The water of the African Rift Lakes which is the native home of the shell dweller cichlids is both hard and alkaline. Thus, you want to keep both the GH and KH on the high side.

Crushed coral or coral sand is the result of crushing and grinding the aragonite formed by coral reefs. This is the stuff used in saltwater aquariums to maintain hardness and alkalinity. It is comprised primarily of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate. The calcium and magnesium help to maintain the GH and the carbonates help to maintain the KH and the pH. Thus, add some coral sand, crushed coral, or even coral rock to your tank. It will dissolve slowly helping to produce the tank conditions you want. Just be sure to soak and rinse it before adding it to your tank to remove excess salt. You will generally find these items in the saltwater section of your LFS, but they are ideal for the type of tank you want to maintain. If your tank is already set up and stocked with fish, you do not want to alter the GH, KH and pH too quickly, so the best bet would be to add some crushed coral into a mesh bag and place it in your filter or on top of your substrate. It can be mixed into your substrate, but if you do that, you won't be able to monitor how fast it is being depleted and you won't be able to remove it if the water gets too hard or too alkaline for your desires.
 
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Tallen78

A bag of crushed coral in your HOB. You'll have to replace it, but we're talking a couple times a year at most. So not exactly "set it and forget it" but not labor intensive by any means.
Thanks I have an fx4 on this tank so I can just add a bag to it

The water of the African Rift Lakes which is the native home of the shell dweller cichlids is both hard and alkaline. Thus, you want to keep both the GH and KH on the high side.

Crushed coral or coral sand is the result of crushing and grinding the aragonite formed by coral reefs. This is the stuff used in saltwater aquariums to maintain hardness and alkalinity. It is comprised primarily of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate. The calcium and magnesium help to maintain the GH and the carbonates help to maintain the KH and the pH. Thus, add some coral sand, crushed coral, or even coral rock to your tank. It will dissolve slowly helping to produce the tank conditions you want. Just be sure to soak and rinse it before adding it to your tank to remove excess salt. You will generally find these items in the saltwater section of your LFS, but they are ideal for the type of tank you want to maintain. If your tank is already set up and stocked with fish, you do not want to alter the GH, KH and pH too quickly, so the best bet would be to add some crushed coral into a mesh bag and place it in your filter or on top of your substrate. It can be mixed into your substrate, but if you do that, you won't be able to monitor how fast it is being depleted and you won't be able to remove it if the water gets too hard or too alkaline for your desires.
So if I swap out the pool filter sand and add cichlid sand I’ll be good
 
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RayClem

Thanks I have an fx4 on this tank so I can just add a bag to it


So if I swap out the pool filter sand and add cichlid sand I’ll be good

That works!
 
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