Maggot as food.

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Treefork

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Well I opened my trash can this morning to a swarm of housefly larva. (The can OUTSIDE). I started to shut it then thought.. hmmm. I got a little dixie cup and a plastic spoon and brought 4 inside. I tossed one into the tank and one of my tiger barbs slurped it up, tossed the other three in and BAM BAM BAM, Tiger Barb food. The Rosy's just sniffed at 'em, the kribs didn't want 'em, but the tiger barbs gobbled those suckers up. All I have to say is... EWWWWWWWW.

Joe
 

ariolex

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Hi joe,

I have been thinking about feeding maggots to my fish too. As opposed to my place, here in NW England maggots seems to be a popular bait for FW fish. So I was thinking why not!
A Mancunian friend said that back in the day, before bait tackles, they used to hang a bone and place a bucket under so that the maggots will fall into the bucket. That way you get "cleaner maggots" (and probably healthier since they are not in contact with chemicals that may be present at the bin) and u don't have to deal with rubbish.

So, if you plan to give your fishies an occasional young fly treat this is an option
 

Shawnie

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great snack and a great protein to feed to inspire spawning just use as a treat though as you dont want to overload fish with too much protein...and I so agree ewwwwwwwwwww
 

Elodea

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You might want to raise your own maggots: wood chips (no cedar or pine) in a jar, drizzle (ok dump) a mix of powedered milk and water onto the wood. Add housefly eggs.

Benefits of that:

A) You'll never know what horrible chemicals are in the trash
B) They may not be housefly maggots. Could be bluebottle blow fly or (god forbid) flesh flies!
C) Easier to collect, less stinky and eww overall
D) Easier to monitor growth, conditions, and whatnot
E) You'll have a constant supply. No need to look in trash any more
 

Elodea

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Oh, I should add the entire process, shouldn't I? (bad memory)

Ok, so make sure you don't drown the wood chips in milk. Just enough to soak them, but not cover. Place the eggs on a bit of wood. Wait for them to hatch (only two or three days). The maggots will feed on the milk solution.

When they are ready to pupate, the maggots will crawl up the sides of the jar. I suggest not to harvest them now (they become rather tough at this point), if you want to harvest, take maybe 2/3-3/4 of the maggots while they're still growing.

Here comes the slightly complicated part. Gently pick up the maggots that are on the sides of the jar with a paintbrush or similar, and place them in another jar (I know). Actually, first line the second jar's bottom with a paper towel, and put a bottle cap with some sugar water (or honey) in the center.

The larva will molt into a pupa through means of a puparium. That means that the vulnerable pupa is covered with the skin of its last molt, so its a bit hard to figure out if they became pupa or not. Just wait.

After a few days, the adults will emerge and feed on the honey/sugar water. They will mate, and lay eggs on the paper towel. Just carefully cut out the section of paper towel with the eggs on it, and place it back into the rearing jar (I hope you washed the wood and put in new, fresh milk by now).

Repeat. And enjoy the food. (I mean the fish, not you)
 

jerilovesfrogs

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hey brian, where in the world did you learn this maggot info? that is seriously grotesque. this must be a guy thing cos i cannot ever see a girl making her own maggots. yuuuuuuck-o
 

Elodea

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Yes, I am a guy hence the little blue arrow thingy. Did I mention I'm barely a teenager?

I don't raise maggots, only bloodworms and mosquito larvae. (and silkworms, an ant farm, have an insect collection, etc.)

I got that info from a very interesting book I read. The same book is prompting me to set up an earwig habitat to observe their breeding habits and slather a mix of beer, honey, and rotting bananas on trees to collect moths.

You think my way is gross? I would never ever think of scooping them up with a plastic spoon! Apparently, Treefork is also a guy.
 

lanlesnee

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I had some dog food that got wet and had maggots in it and I thought the same thing, fish food. Then I smell it and thought, never mind.

This is kind of off subject a little, but has anyone every feed mesquito larvae to fish? Seems like this would be great food for fish.
 
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Treefork

Treefork

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Wow this thread went places I never thought it would go. lol Thanks for the maggot advice, don't know if I have the stomach to raise them up. Was probably just a one time treat. My wife would kill me if I started hatching maggots in the house. Not to mention my kids would probably find a way to let them loose.
 
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