10 Gallon Tank Lowering Salinity Level

JtheFishMan

Member
My salinity level is at 1.026 at the moment. That is decent, but I would like to lower it a little bit. I have tried scooping out a cup or two of saltwater out of the tank, and replacing it with freshwater, because I know freshwater lowers the salinity level. But, the level has not budged. If it does not move, I will probably just leave as is, because stability is very important.

Is there another (and maybe easier) way to effectively lower the salinity level in a saltwater aquarium?
 

Tallen78

Member
JtheFishMan said:
My salinity level is at 1.026 at the moment. That is decent, but I would like to lower it a little bit. I have tried scooping out a cup or two of saltwater out of the tank, and replacing it with freshwater, because I know freshwater lowers the salinity level. But, the level has not budged. If it does not move, I will probably just leave as is, because stability is very important.

Is there another (and maybe easier) way to effectively lower the salinity level in a saltwater aquarium?
When doing ur water change just mix ur new water at a lower salinity
 
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JtheFishMan

Member
Tallen78 said:
When doing ur water change just mix ur new water at a lower salinity
That way it levels out. Thanks!
 

RayClem

Member
Do you have a reef tank or a FOWLER tank? If you have a reef tank, you want to keep the salinity above 1.024. For a FOWLER tank, you can go a little below that, but never below 1.020.

The primary advantage to a lower salinity is you need less salt per gallon when doing water changes, so there is a cost savings.

What is the salinity of your water change water after all of the salt has had a chance to dissolve? That can be a slow process.

If you have to replace water that evaporates, what water are you using? Ideally, you will use RO water, distilled water or rain water for this purpose. You can use tap water, but it may or may not be ideal depending upon the quality of the water. If you replace evaporation with salt water, your salinity will increase over time, so do not do that.

I always kept a tub full of RO water to use for making up salt water and for replacing evaporation. I also kept a tub of salt water so the minerals would have adequate time to dissolve. As I got older, saltwater tanks was too much work, so I do freshwater only now, but I kept multiple saltwater tanks for about 15 years.
 
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JtheFishMan

Member
RayClem said:
Do you have a reef tank or a FOWLER tank? If you have a reef tank, you want to keep the salinity above 1.024. For a FOWLER tank, you can go a little below that, but never below 1.020.

The primary advantage to a lower salinity is you need less salt per gallon when doing water changes, so there is a cost savings.

What is the salinity of your water change water after all of the salt has had a chance to dissolve? That can be a slow process.

If you have to replace water that evaporates, what water are you using? Ideally, you will use RO water, distilled water or rain water for this purpose. You can use tap water, but it may or may not be ideal depending upon the quality of the water. If you replace evaporation with salt water, your salinity will increase over time, so do not do that.

I always kept a tub full of RO water to use for making up salt water and for replacing evaporation. I also kept a tub of salt water so the minerals would have adequate time to dissolve. As I got older, saltwater tanks was too much work, so I do freshwater only now, but I kept multiple saltwater tanks for about 15 years.
I have a FOWLER tank with one piece of coral. Is that considered a reef tank? The salinity of my water change after all the salt has dissolved is around 1.024 but slowly rises as the week goes on and more water evaporates.

To replace water that evaporates, I replace it with fresh water. I know not to make the mistake of topping the aquarium off with even more saltwater.
 

RayClem

Member
JtheFishMan said:
I have a FOWLER tank with one piece of coral. Is that considered a reef tank? The salinity of my water change after all the salt has dissolved is around 1.024 but slowly rises as the week goes on and more water evaporates.

To replace water that evaporates, I replace it with fresh water. I know not to make the mistake of topping the aquarium off with even more saltwater.

As long as you have even one coral in the tank, it is best to keep the salinity and pH on the high side. If you have a hard coral, that is even more important than if you have a soft coral.

What is the hardness of your tap water?. If the water is relatively soft, it won't contribute much to the mineral content of your tank. However, since you are making up water at 1.024 density and end up with 1.026 in your tank, I suspect your tap water is pretty hard. My water was 450-500 ppm hardness which is super hard. That is why I used RO water for salt water makeup and for replacing water lost to evaporation.

You can purchase an RO system that will make about 2 gallons per hour of RO water for around $150. However, you will need some way of collecting water and controlling the flow. Many of the systems come with a small pressurized tank designed to hold enough water for drinking purposes, but that will not suffice for your aquarium needs. I have mine discharge into a 40 gallon heavy duty trash can and control the system using a controller designed to control a lawn sprinkler. I set the timer based on the amount of RO water I need.
 
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JtheFishMan

Member
RayClem said:
As long as you have even one coral in the tank, it is best to keep the salinity and pH on the high side. If you have a hard coral, that is even more important than if you have a soft coral.

What is the hardness of your tap water?. If the water is relatively soft, it won't contribute much to the mineral content of your tank. However, since you are making up water at 1.024 density and end up with 1.026 in your tank, I suspect your tap water is pretty hard. My water was 450-500 ppm hardness which is super hard. That is why I used RO water for salt water makeup and for replacing water lost to evaporation.

You can purchase an RO system that will make about 2 gallons per hour of RO water for around $150. However, you will need some way of collecting water and controlling the flow. Many of the systems come with a small pressurized tank designed to hold enough water for drinking purposes, but that will not suffice for your aquarium needs. I have mine discharge into a 40 gallon heavy duty trash can and control the system using a controller designed to control a lawn sprinkler. I set the timer based on the amount of RO water I need.
I am about to do a water change, let me get back to you on that.
 

Jesterrace

Member
JtheFishMan said:
My salinity level is at 1.026 at the moment. That is decent, but I would like to lower it a little bit. I have tried scooping out a cup or two of saltwater out of the tank, and replacing it with freshwater, because I know freshwater lowers the salinity level. But, the level has not budged. If it does not move, I will probably just leave as is, because stability is very important.

Is there another (and maybe easier) way to effectively lower the salinity level in a saltwater aquarium?
What are you using to measure your salinity levels?
 
  • Thread Starter

JtheFishMan

Member
Jesterrace said:
What are you using to measure your salinity levels?
I am using an arm swing hydrometer. I know a refractometer is more accurate, but I do not have one at the moment.
 

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