Low Nitrates Causing Plant Issues


MrBryan723

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So I did this thing and now I'm not registering any nitrates in my tank. I feel I need to add some nitrogen back in to my system to help with my plants. I'm noticing some damaged looking leaves on a few and my lillies seem to be dropping some leaves as well. I have this:
20190716_000636.jpg

I'm aware of nitrate poisoning and nitrate shock etc. Does anybody have a clue if I can use it in my aquarium, and if so a way to dose it? I dose seachem ferts every 4-5 days for my macros.
 

Crispii

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You can use dirt as long as it is organic. Add about an inch of that dirt and capped at least 1.5-2 inches of gravel or sand. Initially, you're going to get an ammonia and nitrite spike because of the dirt.
 

Fisker

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I have no idea about the stuff you're showing in the picture, but you can dose Potassium Nitrate to your aquarium 100% safely. It's used quite a bit in high-tech planted tanks and even in saltwater reef tanks to bump up nitrate levels without having to worry about ballooning other levels too high, as Potassium is pretty safe at most realistic levels.

Potassium Nitrate is labeled as stump remover at a lot of stores, and you can usually pick up a large bottle for less than $10. I got mine at Lowe's. There are a ton of guides online on how to do it, what ratios to use, and how to dose it, but the general idea is this:

1) Crush up the stump remover into a fine, white powder. When it's ready to be mixed with water, it'll look a bit like a certain illegal substance - or, maybe a bit like marine aquarium salt, if you prefer to think of it that way.

2) Go online and find a good ratio of the powder to water. Most will require you to weigh the powder with a scale, but there are calculators that allow you to use kitchen measurements (cups, Tbs, Tsp, etc.) to mix it. Measure 2-3 times before you mix - if you're misunderstanding the instructions, it could be fatal for your fish!

3) Mix until it's completely dissolved, which should happen fairly quickly. Store the solution in indirect light, or, better yet, in your fridge. It's very nutrient-rich water, with most solutions having 4000-5000 PPM of Nitrate. It's not uncommon for algae to bloom in the container, or for bacteria to start to grow. I've personally experienced this. Keep it in the fridge, and shake it up every week or so to keep it from stagnating.
 

MrBryan723

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It's a dirted tank already so I don't really have room for more as you can see lol.
20190531_132515.jpg
 

MrBryan723

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I have no idea about the stuff you're showing in the picture, but you can dose Potassium Nitrate to your aquarium 100% safely. It's used quite a bit in high-tech planted tanks and even in saltwater reef tanks to bump up nitrate levels without having to worry about ballooning other levels too high, as Potassium is pretty safe at most realistic levels.

Potassium Nitrate is labeled as stump remover at a lot of stores, and you can usually pick up a large bottle for less than $10. I got mine at Lowe's. There are a ton of guides online on how to do it, what ratios to use, and how to dose it, but the general idea is this:

1) Crush up the stump remover into a fine, white powder. When it's ready to be mixed with water, it'll look a bit like a certain illegal substance - or, maybe a bit like marine aquarium salt, if you prefer to think of it that way.

2) Go online and find a good ratio of the powder to water. Most will require you to weigh the powder with a scale, but there are calculators that allow you to use kitchen measurements (cups, Tbs, Tsp, etc.) to mix it. Measure 2-3 times before you mix - if you're misunderstanding the instructions, it could be fatal for your fish!

3) Mix until it's completely dissolved, which should happen fairly quickly. Store the solution in indirect light, or, better yet, in your fridge. It's very nutrient-rich water, with most solutions having 4000-5000 PPM of Nitrate. It's not uncommon for algae to bloom in the container, or for bacteria to start to grow. I've personally experienced this. Keep it in the fridge, and shake it up every week or so to keep it from stagnating.
This sounds somewhat promising. My seachem already does contain some K in it tho, so maybe reduce it a bit while I add the potassium nitrate?
I've never seen it in the store tho so I hope I can find it. I am familiar with sodium metabisulfate as stump out tho so hopefully it's in the same place.
 

fa4960

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Buy KNO3 (Potassium Nitrate) and either dry dose or make a solution. Use Rotalabutterfly.com to calculate the amount needed to reach the recommended ppm value or decide on your own target ppm value.

KNO3 is very cheap. Here in Bangkok I paid < USD 2 for 1 kg. For my 330 Gal tank I need app. 25 g per dose.
 

MrBryan723

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Buy KNO3 (Potassium Nitrate) and either dry dose or make a solution. Use Rotalabutterfly.com to calculate the amount needed to reach the recommended ppm value or decide on your own target ppm value.

KNO3 is very cheap. Here in Bangkok I paid < USD 2 for 1 kg. For my 330 Gal tank I need app. 25 g per dose.
Ok so KNO3 seems to be the way to go. I'll check the site out for dosing, but my concern comes back to having cherry shrimp in the tank and not wanting to shock them by increasing the nitrates too quickly.
But again, this might give me the ability to actually measure how quickly my filtration system is removing them from my water column.
I have the ability to either drop the solution straight in with the leafy parts of the plants or also send it straight to the root system, which one would work out better for the sake of the plants?
 

fa4960

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I would make a solution. In my case I use a 2500 ml (2.5 Liter) bottle and calculate so one dose is 250 ml but this is mainly due the fact I want to dose same amount as my other macros with lower solubility. KNO3 solubility in water is 242 g/L so you can make a quite strong solution if you so wish.

Since you have the options of sending it to the roots I would probably do that, i.e. pour the solution dose into your "staging" tank I think you mentioned in your other posts. Not sure it makes a difference though for plants that are water column feeders but maybe for the roof feeders?
 
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MrBryan723

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I'm more focused on root feeders for sure. Swords crypts and lillies are my main plants along with some cardinals and other stemmed plants(also have anubis and java ferns too lol). I'm sure enough will get to those as well. I'll have to test me water a few times so see if I can find out. Appreciate the insight and advice guys.
 

fa4960

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In that case I would do some DIY root tabs based on Osmocote Plus fertiliser and place them close to the big root feeders. With your filtering system some of this will leak into the water column also.
 




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