Low Maintenance 29 Gallon Shrimp Tank

Sorg67

I planning a 29 gallon shrimp tank. I have about 30 or 40 blue shrimp to start it with. I want to create an ideal breeding situation. How would you set it up?

Just use the 30 or 40 I have that came from an initial population of 9? Or add some new blood for more diverse genetic material?
Sponge Filters? Two enough?
Need more filtration to support a large shrimp population?
How many shrimp could a 29 gallon tank hold? A lot, I am guessing. Hundreds?
Sand or gravel?
Hiding places?
What kind of plants?
What kind of food?
The tank currently has feeder guppies. They will be re-located.
Wondering whether I should shut the tank down and start from scratch or keep it running and re-populate.
Considering shutting it down to get ride of black algae. Although I really do not mind the black algae too much and it does not seem to get out of control if I keep up with water changes.
Also considering shutting it down to get rid of the snails I do not like and repopulate with just the snails I want.
 

richiep

First Off add new blood a dozen of the same strain
I wouldn't go the sponge filters I've found by doing tests your nitraits will start to build so go for a hang on the back filter
Forget about numbers in a 29g
Sand is by far the best substrate
Anything a shrimp can hide under or in is great
Put whatever plants you like but I and my shrimp love jarva moss & Subwassertang
Get a mix of food and alternate between cooked veg
If you shut the tank down then cycle and run for 3 months before adding shrimp, if you're changing substrate then start from scratch you'll know where you stand then
 
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Cherryshrimp420

A tank entirely of java moss is probably the "best" for breeding :D
 
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Flyfisha

Hi Sorg67
You ask how each of us would create an ideal breeding situation with low maintenance . And how we would set it up.

You also ask about some of the equipment you have.
This is what i would do for a low maintenance breeding tank and my opinion on your equipment.

Two 6 inch sponge filters will work fine but a third would mean maintenance would be easier or more relaxing. Cleaning one sponge every couple of months is probably as low a maintenance as is safe? . At least it’s working for me currently.
Like any tank with any creatures filtration in a shrimp tank is about a stable population of bacteria not about how many filters you have. Having multiple filters just helps the human be more relaxed about giving one filter a good hard cleaning as the bacteria are spread between 3 filters. Killing off some bacteria each time you thoroughly clean a filter is to be expected and in some peoples eyes encouraged as it promotes healthy young bacteria colonies they say.

There is no need for sand or gravel in a shrimp tank. Bare bottom works for easy cleaning in a low maintenance tank. I would use large volumes of dry leaf litter as a cover and food source. Wood and cinnamon bark have there place in a shrimp tank. Nothing wrong with sand if you vacuum it. Gravel will always have uneaten food and waste ( poop ) in it. It’s time consuming keeping gravel clean. Gravel would not be low maintenance.
Thousands of shrimp do produce a noticeable volume of poop on a bare bottom tank. You will have to remove the waste at some time. Sand will be more time consuming to clean but will hide the shrimp waste from view. In my opinion hiding waste is not low maintenance if you have to remove it eventually. Large volumes of leaf litter and cinnamon bark hide waste but are easy to push around as you vacuum up the poop. Rock piles are a hideout but more work to vacuum.

Any food will be eaten by cherry shrimp. Uneaten food is your and their enemy. Fresh vegetables and a variety of dry foods are logically recommended. A feeding dish is necessary to avoid uneaten foods with substrate. A bare bottom tank is one big feeding dish , but will still need cleaning. I personally don’t cook fresh vegetables or fresh green leaves and flowers. I do remove uneaten vegetables within 24 hours.

A monoculture of Java moss , guppy grass or subwassertang is simple to maintain. Subwassertang grows well with low light. Java Moss tends to kill itself if allowed to grow out it shades the old moss underneath. Try both and see what grows with NO maintenance in your water parameters and lighting.

I can’t help you deciding on keeping the bacteria alive or going dry in order to kill a few pest snails and black algae.
I can say the long term effects of copper sulphate , a common ingredient in snail killer are over rated. My experience is that it is possible to kill every snail with this poison and still use the tank for shrimp and snails a few months later without a major dry cleaning. Not that I recommend it. But those people that say copper sulphate in a tank means you can’t have shrimp ever again have not tried it for themselves.
You ask what I would do. I would pull the fish out and add shrimp the next day. Spot cleaning with hydrogen peroxide will kill black beard algae but it’s going to come back as are the snails I suggest if your routine does not change.
 
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Sorg67

I wouldn't go the sponge filters I've found by doing tests your nitraits will start to build so go for a hang on the back filter
Do I need to worry about the flow rate? The existing HOB seems to create a lot of water flow.
 
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richiep

Shrimp are fine in a small currant some actually live in streams in the wild
My tests which I did a writeup on here were done over 12months and proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that your perameters will be more stable and are just as easy to clean as ponges
 
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Sorg67

Shrimp are fine in a small currant some actually live in streams in the wild
My tests which I did a writeup on here were done over 12months and proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that your perameters will be more stable and are just as easy to clean as ponges
Glad to hear that. I like HOB better. Do you advocate sponge in addition to HOB for back up and additional aeration?

Do you put a sponge cover on HOB intake to avoid sucking up baby shrimp?
 
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richiep

Whoever possible i put a sponge on an intake it stops shrimp going in and acts as a prefilter but I disguard and replaced them regularly as its cheap enough
This setup is on all my shrimp tanks now, you can see the small bit of sponge in the back
On the second you can see the flow and belive it or not if I over fill shrimp get on on the filter under the cover so they climb through a fair currant, my aeration is done with airstones
I used to keep a sponge as a backup in my fish tank but have done away with them all, ist as easy to have a spare hob and move things over if you have problems
 

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