Long Term Use Of Aquarium Salt

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Disease' started by ap4lmtree, Jun 23, 2019.

  1. ap4lmtree

    ap4lmtreeWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    780
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Ratings:
    +111
    Experience:
    2 years
    According to this article that cites a 1995 Auburn University study, channel catfish (not aquarium corydoras) with columaris outbreak had a greater survivability rate with at least short term use of 3000 mg /l or 2.54 teaspoon per gallon of sodium chloride. In addition, short term use of about a 1000 mg/l or .84 teaspoon per gallon substantially increased survivability compared to 0 mg/l of sodium chloride. ( https://www.aquarium-pond-answers[.]com/2008/03/salt-in-freshwater-aquariums.html citing Auburn University study )

    Based just on that website article, I am going to start using recommended 1 tablespoon per 5 gallon of sodium chlorine long term in my betta tanks in order to prevent and mitigate columnaris from ever affecting my betta fish. [I will use only 1 teaspoon per 5 gallon in my corydoras and kuhli leaches main tank.]

    In addition, I wonder how well long term use, before outbreak, and rather than short term use of sodium chloride prevents or mitigates areomonas or ich outbreaks or issues. From a quick search, I think sodium chloride delays aeromonas hydrophila exponential growth before it adapts to sodium chloride to do such exponential growth, according to a study involving sodium chloride preservative in food. ( https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1046/j.1472-765x.2000.00662.x?sid=nlm:pubmed ). Aeromonas hydrophilia is resistant to water chlorine and ph above 3.0. It isn't resistant to high temperature water. Combating aeromonas is important to preventing dopsy and I think many fin rot.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
  2. Nobody

    NobodyNew MemberMember

    Messages:
    19
    Ratings:
    +2
    When I first set my tank up I used salt for months with corydoras in it and they were fine. I can't use it now though as amano shrimp definitely don't like it.

    I doubt such small amounts will harm fish. It's a bit like breathing salty air near the coast :p
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
  3. OP
    OP
    ap4lmtree

    ap4lmtreeWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    780
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    Ratings:
    +111
    Experience:
    2 years
    Yes, I think i will use salt in my tank with corydoras and kuhli loaches. The first url i posted, says they recommend one teaspoon per 5 gallon, which is lower than the usual one tablespoon per 5 gallon.
     
  4. david1978

    david1978Fishlore LegendMember

    Messages:
    13,028
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    pa usa
    Ratings:
    +9,405
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    I never liked the idea of long term salt use for freshwater fish. Besides having to watch your salinity like you would in a marine tank to keep it stable and in safe levels so you don't kill your fish or plants. The other issue osmosis of the fish which over time can have trouble eliminating liquids from their cells. The last issue is your running a lower salinity then typically short term treatments so it will not have the same effect and if anything does rear its ugly head that could of been treated with salt can no longer be treated with salt since its built up an immunity to it.
     
  5. oldsalt777

    oldsalt777Well Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    2,110
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +657
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Hello ap..

    All I can tell you is what I do with standard aquarium salt: I've used a little in my tanks for around 15 years and never had a problem with a virus or pathogen infecting my fish or problems with my aquarium plants. I dose a little, one to two teaspoons in every 5 gallons of treated, tap water. I keep all kinds of fish from Corydoras, to Tetras to Livebearers to many Goldfish and the tanks are heavily planted. Traces of salt in the water will retard the growth of a parasite or most anything else that can infect fish and in general seems to maintain their immune system and breathing. When I use salt, the fish seem very calm in the tank. I'd definitely recommend using a little.

    Old
     
  6. mattgirl

    mattgirlFishlore VIPMember

    Messages:
    8,010
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Closer to Heaven every day but for now-Arkansas
    Ratings:
    +6,695
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    I know the use of salt in a fresh water tank is frowned upon here on the forum but I have always used a little bit of it in my tanks. I only add it the week I do my bigger than normal weekly water change so the salt level isn't constant. For 3 weeks I do my normal water change without adding salt and the 4th week I do the big one and add salt. I don't add the amount recommended on the box though. I add 3 tablespoons to my 55 gallon tank so it is a very weak dose.

    I have to think I am doing something right since I've never had to deal with any of the diseases I read about here on the forum. It could have something to do with the salt but more than likely it is because of the constant water changes. Fresh clean water is the best preventive I have found. Salt is just extra insurance.
     
  7. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDaveWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,606
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +834
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Salt would make it easier since water follows sodium.

    The dosage for Columnaris is quite high to be using regularly. The best strategy is to prevent build up of organic waste which feeds the Columnaris population.

    This is why I don't like canister filters. People clean them every few months and they become huge Columnaris, Aeromonas, Saprolegnia, Mycobacterium, etc. farms.
     
  8. Nobody

    NobodyNew MemberMember

    Messages:
    19
    Ratings:
    +2
    I have a UV steriliser after my canister filter which should take care of that :)
     
  9. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDaveWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,606
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +834
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    UV has been shown not to affect bacteria populations.
     
  10. Nobody

    NobodyNew MemberMember

    Messages:
    19
    Ratings:
    +2
    They use UV to kill bacteria at water treatment plants.
     
  11. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDaveWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,606
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +834
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Ultraviolet light control of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet in a closed fish culture recirculation system
    Pathogen Reduction in Closed Aquaculture Systems by UV Radiation: Fact or Artifact?*
     
  12. Wraithen

    WraithenFishlore VIPMember

    Messages:
    4,353
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +1,687
    Experience:
    3 years
    That only says that what's on the fish doesn't get taken out. Kind of a duh moment in my opinion as nobody is hitting their fish with uv light in any appreciable amount. Free floating organisms though are toast. The biggest issue most people are going to have is an inappropriate setup. These built ins aren't the best way to go about it due to lower wattage and faster rates from the pump.
     
  13. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDaveWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,606
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +834
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    UV only reduces the bacteria in the effluent. It doesn't reduce numbers in the tanks and doesn't reduce disease.

    Meanwhile, the mass of decaying organic matter in the filter is increasing levels of dissolved organics and lower dissolved oxygen both of which increase susceptibility to disease.
     
  14. Nobody

    NobodyNew MemberMember

    Messages:
    19
    Ratings:
    +2
    It will kill pretty much anything coming out of the filter as it has to pass though it. It just needs to have enough exposure time and most of the external ones will as the water spirals around the bulb. Of course it's not going to kill anything free floating in the tank itself.

    Like I said, UK water treatment plants are now using UV to treat tap water and it's some of the best quality in the world as they need a lot less chemicals.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  15. Kjeldsen

    KjeldsenValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    332
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    California
    Ratings:
    +220
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Though I've only used it on as needed basis, I'd probably make it a regular addition to a betta tank after reading so many posts about dropsy and fin rot for no discernable reason. Very interested to hear your long term results.

    It is important to realize that most fish infections are probably acquired from inanimate sources (i.e., water molds sporulating on dead organic matter).[...] Most fish-pathogenic water molds are inhibited by even low prolonged immersion salt concentrations (>3 ppt), which is probably why they do not affect marine fish in high salinities (see PROBLEM 35). Prolonged immersion salt also helps to counteract osmotic stress caused by skin damage and subsequent ion loss. Unfortunately, prolonged immersion salt is impractical in most commercial production situations. Noga, Edward J.. Fish Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment (Kindle Locations 5788-5791). Wiley. Kindle Edition.


     
  16. AvalancheDave

    AvalancheDaveWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,606
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +834
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Ultraviolet light control of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet in a closed fish culture recirculation system
    Pathogen Reduction in Closed Aquaculture Systems by UV Radiation: Fact or Artifact?*
     
Loading...