Livebearer fish rescue help

fishbreeeder

Hi

I have gotten a 15-gallon tank and I wanted to rescue livebearer fish. I went and bought 4 platys from filthy tanks in PetSmart. 3 females ( Mango, Annabeth, and Dania) and trump, My male. Now I have six fries whom I netted out. After this coronavirus ends I will rehome them. How many platys can I keep how can I improve their health keep them happy and any advice really is appreciated.
 

MikeRad89

Give them to a local fish store.
 

AquaCaitlin

Hello! You have posted many threads similar to this one several times. It is best to keep it to 1 or 2 threads. Remember to also use the search function for specific questions you have, and many questions have been asked before.
 

Gel0city

Lots of questions that you have asked have been answered, you can search them on the search bar. You could get one more platy but watch out, since livebearers will produce lots of fry. You will have to be constantly rehoming them if you don't have enough space.
 

fishbreeeder

Thank you all and sorry for posting so many threads.
 

AquaCaitlin

Thank you all and sorry for posting so many threads.
It’s okay, you’re just trying to do the best for your fish. No harm there.
 

Gel0city

Thank you all and sorry for posting so many threads.
It's completely fine! We aren't hating on you, haha. You can post threads to ask for more specific questions, but this forum has lots of great information.
 

flyinGourami

I wouldn't get any more. If you keep the original they'll produce more fry, chances are you are gonna end up with too many lol. I personally would keep the ones in there already, periodically give fry away, and maybe introduce new ones once in a while to keep the genetics stronger(quarantine may be an issue though).
 

Flyfisha

Feed your “ rescued” fish dry fish food. The ingredients are fish that have been killed.
 

YellowGuppy

There's also something to be said for selective use of the word "rescue." Some may disagree, but there are a lot of fish keepers who might suggest you didn't rescue them, but you rather purchased them from a disreputable source. The more often this happens, the more profit the seller makes, and the more likely they are to purchase more fish from a wholesaler and put them into exactly the same tank. While I might be inclined to offer the benefit of the doubt to the retailer (maybe they have an ignorant new staff member who isn't fully trained yet, etc.), others might infer that this sort of "rescue" situation gets used by some stores as a sales tactic.

Either way, though, the term "rescue" can be unambiguously for some of the following situations:
- Convincing a retailer to provide you with fish in deplorable conditions at no cost
- Rehoming a fish from a friend or family member who knows that they're providing inadequate care, again, generally without cost
- Providing your equipment and care to other aquarists who aren't as capable to care for a fish (e.g. if someone doesn't have a hospital tank but needs to treat a single fish, you might rescue that one fish by providing care for it)

Buying livestock from sketchy sellers provides profits to sketchy sellers. If all their product dies as a result of their malpractice, they lose money, and if money is their only motivation, hopefully it will be enough to encourage them to reconsider their methodology. Just something to consider before making another "rescue".
 

flyinGourami

There's also something to be said for selective use of the word "rescue." Some may disagree, but there are a lot of fish keepers who might suggest you didn't rescue them, but you rather purchased them from a disreputable source. The more often this happens, the more profit the seller makes, and the more likely they are to purchase more fish from a wholesaler and put them into exactly the same tank. While I might be inclined to offer the benefit of the doubt to the retailer (maybe they have an ignorant new staff member who isn't fully trained yet, etc.), others might infer that this sort of "rescue" situation gets used by some stores as a sales tactic.

Either way, though, the term "rescue" can be unambiguously for some of the following situations:
- Convincing a retailer to provide you with fish in deplorable conditions at no cost
- Rehoming a fish from a friend or family member who knows that they're providing inadequate care, again, generally without cost
- Providing your equipment and care to other aquarists who aren't as capable to care for a fish (e.g. if someone doesn't have a hospital tank but needs to treat a single fish, you might rescue that one fish by providing care for it)

Buying livestock from sketchy sellers provides profits to sketchy sellers. If all their product dies as a result of their malpractice, they lose money, and if money is their only motivation, hopefully it will be enough to encourage them to reconsider their methodology. Just something to consider before making another "rescue".
True. "Rescuing" a fish MIGHT mean better conditions for the fish "rescued" but it'll mean worse for fish in the future if that makes any sense.
 

fishbreeeder

yea I know I hate the mill that supplies fish. I will go with that. Instead, I will take fish for free from overcrowded tanks. I will also find fish from people who cant care for them. Unwanted fry and stuff. I just want to help livebearer fishies.
 

kbn

Good.

May I suggest, separate the males and females of you don't want babies.
 

fishbreeeder

Good.

May I suggest, separate the males and females of you don't want babies.
Actually I do want fry. I'm breeding for a very nice LFS
 

kbn

Well then , I wish you the best of luck! Separate the fry though, I heard yuppies eat their fry and I'm not sure platys do that but better be safe than sorry right. Once again, Best of luck!
Actually I do want fry. I'm breeding for a very nice LFS
 

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