Lighting? Help 

  • Thread starter

Astard22

New Member
Messages
15
Reaction score
0
Points
76
Experience
3 years
I am looking for lighting in my 6ft tank. I was after an enclosure with 4 x 3ft bulbs in it. Can anyone recommend a good brand and where to get it from? Also i want REALLY white light, does anyone know what sort of bulbs i should be looking for to suit this?
 

NMfishman

Well Known Member
Messages
724
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
5 to 10 years
for the color you would want bulbs in the 4000-5000 kelvin temperature range, higher than this and they start to get blue and lower they get yellow. 5000k would probably be best I think. Daylight is around 6500K. I can't help on the bulbs themselves, but I use and recommend getting CFL bulbs like you use in your house. You can get dome fixtures that are intended for reptiles and with about 26 watt bulbs, you would need at least 4 but probably 6-8 for brighter lighting. This is a cheaper way to go then the regular fixtures, but if you can afford it the regular fixtures are better.
 

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,744
Reaction score
97
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
If you want them really really white go with 10000k bulbs. I don't know of a good brand but I'd go with t5ho bulbs also. After you go higher than 10000k it starts looking blue. I have 6700k bulbs over my planted tanks and they are really bright, as well.
 

NMfishman

Well Known Member
Messages
724
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
5 to 10 years
actually they start turning blue after about 5500k. 10000k would be blue not white. I have both 5000k and 6500k, the 6500k have a slight blue tint but the 5000k are white. also the kelvin temperature has nothing to do with brightness. here is a chart of the colors in the temperature scale:
 

Attachments

Hsunami

Well Known Member
Messages
798
Reaction score
5
Points
113
Experience
2 years


Nova Extreme lights are awesome, if you are ever gonna upgrade to high light plants i would recommend the Nova Extreme 24 Hour or the Nova Extreme Pro.

They come with bulbs too so you won't need to buy them. Very easy to set up
 

Nutter

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,458
Reaction score
149
Points
308
Experience
More than 10 years
That chart is outright wrong. I've never had a tube under 8,000k that was even close to white. 10,000k is white & that's just the reality of it. Anything under 6,500k has a very noticeable yellow cast to it. In the 4,000-5,000k range it's yellow enough to be off putting. I'll bet if you put your 5,000k & 6,500k lights next to a 10,000k you will realise jsut how yellow your current lights really are. Sorry to disagree but my experience has taught me enough to know that chart is very wrong.

As for the fixture itself you are probably better off going for a T5HO as is mentioned above but knowing what you want to achieve with the light would be helpful to. Do you want live plants or just to view the fish? If you do want live plants do you just want a low light tank with low light plants that doesn't need co2 injection or do you want a high light set up that does need co2 & can grow almost any aquarium plant you want?

Find your fixture online. There are not too many places in Aus to arder from but they will be much cheaper than buying the fixtures from LFS or pet stores.
 

Eylisia

Valued Member
Messages
177
Reaction score
3
Points
113
Experience
More than 10 years
Agree with Nutter, plant light (ie around 5500 - 6500) looks yellow. There is however a difference between perceived light and emitted light, so the chart may not be wrong per se (I didn't actually check it).
 

Nutter

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,458
Reaction score
149
Points
308
Experience
More than 10 years
Well Kelvin is a scale of what colour light should appear to the human eye. There are obviously differences from individual to individual on just how that colour is percieved but at the end of the day we should all see a very similar colour. So light emited as tested by equipment, should not come into play on the kelvin scale. The other thing that comes into play is that one tube manufacturers version of say 6,500k will probably not emit the same colour light as another manufacturers 6,500k.
 

NMfishman

Well Known Member
Messages
724
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
5 to 10 years
The color temperature of a light source is the temperature of an ideal black-body radiator that radiates light of comparable hue to that of the light source. (taken from a wikipedia article).

Nutter said:
Well Kelvin is a scale of what colour light should appear to the human eye. There are obviously differences from individual to individual on just how that colour is percieved but at the end of the day we should all see a very similar colour. So light emited as tested by equipment, should not come into play on the kelvin scale. The other thing that comes into play is that one tube manufacturers version of say 6,500k will probably not emit the same colour light as another manufacturers 6,500k.
Now I do agree with that Graeme, but it is a fact that 10000k = blue light and the scale I posted is accurate.

10000k bulbs are typically used on saltwater tanks as it helps corals and stuff grow and some use it on freshwater tanks cuz they like the look, however I have never heard that it looks white.

Here is a quote from a description of a 10000k bulb, "1000K high intensity lamp with strong emissions in the blue spectrum simulating deeper ocean environments."

and a quote on a 6700k bulb "Hagen Life-Glo 2 T5 Fluorescent Bulbs emit a natural white light that provides intense illumination."

here is the wikipedia article I quoted from earlier: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature This gives a good explanation of the scale and the colors.

My advice to you Astard, is to decide what kelvin temp. you want then look at the packaging of the individual bulbs and make a decision based off of what the box says about the color of the bulb. You might try getting a couple different kinds of bulbs and seeing which one you like best, then take the others you didn't like back and get more of the one you liked. You can also combine different types of bulbs to get a nice effect.

here are some pics. The first two pics are of some different colored lights with their color temperature that I found on the web. The third is another scale like the one I posted earlier. the final two pics are of my own 6500k bulb on the left and the 5000k bulb on the right. (I know in the 4th pic the 5000k on the right looks slightly yellow, but its not, it is just how the pic came out. The color on the wall was white.)
 

Attachments

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,744
Reaction score
97
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
I have 10,000k power compact bulbs and they are a very bright white. Possibly a faint blue, but definitely not sky blue. I also have 18000k actinic bulb that is definitely blue.
 

NMfishman

Well Known Member
Messages
724
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
5 to 10 years
jetajockey said:
I have 10,000k power compact bulbs and they are a very bright white. Possibly a faint blue, but definitely not sky blue. I also have 18000k actinic bulb that is definitely blue.
The only thing I can think of is that the manufacturer marked it as 10000k when its not or they add something to it that makes however they measure it read it as 10000k but when we see it, it appears more white. The fact remains though that when looking at true color temp. as established by its definition, a 10000k light should be a blue color. I can't say why these bulbs you two are referencing appear more white than they should.

The only thing that really matters here is that you like the color of the bulb, no matter what the bulb says it is and what it actually is, as long as you like the color use the bulb. If you are dealing with plants, the spectrum of the light is the important thing to look at, not the overall color that we see so the color temp alone isn't worth much. As for Astard (which I assume his tank isn't planted) I suggest getting a couple different types of bulbs and seeing which one you like best then taking the others back or doing a combo of bulbs to create your own look.
 

Nutter

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,458
Reaction score
149
Points
308
Experience
More than 10 years
NMfishman - "10000K high intensity lamp with strong emissions in the blue spectrum simulating deeper ocean environments". Well the problem with that is that spectrum & Kelvin have nothing to do with each other at all. Different manufacturers use different amounts of light from the three major parts of the spectrum to make up their kelvin ratings. This is why not all 6,500k (or any other rating) tubes are as good as each other. The same "simulating deeper ocean environments" claim can be made by almost any light tube/bulb manufacturer. As light penetrates deeper into water light from the different parts of the spectrum are filtered out. First to go is red, then yellow with the blue light penetrating the deepest. Seeing as the blue light is the last to go & almost all light tubes/bulbs contain a good measure of blue light (blue light is the most visible to humans) nearly every tube manufacturer can make the same claim.

I thin your confusing 10,000k with actinic when you speak of their use in marine aquariums to assist in coral growth. It is actinic light that corals & certain inverts need to grow, not 10,000k light. In marine aquaria it is popular to use 10,000k lights in combination with actinic tubes because the very white light emited by the 10,000k balances out the very blue light the actinic emits. In other words many marine aquarists use 10,000k tubes with actinics so that their aquarium doesn't look weird.

As for the scale you put up that looks like the end of a fluoro tube, it's descriptions of the type of lights at different kelvin rating leaves alot to be desired. The vast majority of Clear Metal Halide lamps are in fact 10,000k, HPS (high pressure sodium) are about 4,500k, & Warm White fluorescent Lamps are usually around 6,500k. If your in any doubt about that go to your local hydroponics shop & have a look at some of the bulbs that are available. Anyway charts being accurate or not is not your fault.

Also worth noting that kelvin is never taken from looking at the bulb/tube itself. It is always taken by looking at the colour of the light reflected from a flat white surface in a darkroom. So your pics of your bulbs are more accurate than you realise & the one that is yellow actually illustrates perfectly what I am talking about.

Anyway, I'm sure we have given the OP more than enough to think about so we should stop with this part of the discussion. I think we would both agree that the best thing the OP can do is to go into a LFS & ask to see different bulbs/tubes actually in use & make their choice based on what gives the most appealing look to them.
 

NMfishman

Well Known Member
Messages
724
Reaction score
0
Points
111
Experience
5 to 10 years
Well I don't really agree with most of what you said and I could go into it more, but I won't.

Nutter said:
Anyway, I'm sure we have given the OP more than enough to think about so we should stop with this part of the discussion. I think we would both agree that the best thing the OP can do is to go into a LFS & ask to see different bulbs/tubes actually in use & make their choice based on what gives the most appealing look to them.
I do, however, agree with this and I think we are getting farther and farther away from Astard's original question. This is something best left for another thread on another day.
See I knew we would agree on something!

I do respect both your opinion and you, even if we disagree. Normally I agree with your advice/opinions and I find you to be very knowledgeable but this time I happen to not agree with you.
Great minds don't always think alike, because if they did would they truly be great?
 
Toggle Sidebar

New Threads

Similar Threads

Aquarium Calculator

Aquarium Photo Contests

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media





Top Bottom