Lfs 'advice' .. Is It Right?

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
Went to the LFS today to buy water conditioner and some plants.

He told me Seachem Water Conditioner was the best over API Conditioner. I think it's personal preference. He told me to add full dose every water change. True? He said natural spring water (where I get my water for the tank) carries heavy metals and this would help get rid of them.

He also told me since my pH was high, to add a pH rock (a white one for about $4) He said it will very gradually lower the pH and very very slowly disintegrate over time. 1) Do these rocks actually lower the pH, and if so.. how much? and 2) Are these actually good for the tank?

Last thing.. he told me to add aquarium salt every other time I change the water. 1 tsp per gallon (so 55 tsp for my 55 tank. That's a TON, right? ..... and he said that they go around all their tanks at the store and taste the water and if it's slightly salty it's good, and if it's not, they add a little salt. ... Aren't you not supposed to 'taste' aquarium water?
 

Discus-Tang

Well Known Member
Messages
3,360
Reaction score
2,515
Points
288
Experience
2 years
Well...uhm, what an, uhm...most peculiar method of checking the fish tanks. They could easily contract a disease from that, such as TB. Don't add salt to your aquariums unless treating a disease.
 

GreekGills

Valued Member
Messages
429
Reaction score
168
Points
63
Experience
Just started
My lfs puts a little salt in to combat ich. They aren't able to carry most of your typical beginner or intermediate fish because of the salt content.
 

Mick Frost

Valued Member
Messages
482
Reaction score
157
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
Spring water can contain heavy metals, yes. keep this in mind if any problems arise from seemingly unrelated changes in your maintenance.
PH being "high" is less of an issue than PH bouncing around from trying to fix it. If your fish are fine with the PH as is (would like to know what it is), leave it. If it does indeed need to come down, Indian Almond Leaves or driftwood would be a more predictable solution than some gimmick on the store shelf.
The biggest problem I see is the mental plasticity of the guy at the LFS. To offer you any direct advice on 3 separate topics he should have asked you questions non stop for at least 15 minutes. Might have something to do with all the aquarium water they drink.
 

danhutchins

Well Known Member
Messages
813
Reaction score
389
Points
78
Experience
5 years
TombedOrchestra said:
Went to the LFS today to buy water conditioner and some plants.

He told me Seachem Water Conditioner was the best over API Conditioner. I think it's personal preference. He told me to add full dose every water change. True? He said natural spring water (where I get my water for the tank) carries heavy metals and this would help get rid of them.

He also told me since my pH was high, to add a pH rock (a white one for about $4) He said it will very gradually lower the pH and very very slowly disintegrate over time. 1) Do these rocks actually lower the pH, and if so.. how much? and 2) Are these actually good for the tank?

Last thing.. he told me to add aquarium salt every other time I change the water. 1 tsp per gallon (so 55 tsp for my 55 tank. That's a TON, right? ..... and he said that they go around all their tanks at the store and taste the water and if it's slightly salty it's good, and if it's not, they add a little salt. ... Aren't you not supposed to 'taste' aquarium water?
Never heard of anyone tasting the tank water. Sounds like the guy has issues.
 

maggie thecat

Well Known Member
Messages
2,457
Reaction score
593
Points
158
Experience
More than 10 years
He's right about conditioners and heavy metals, but the rest?

Salt has some very specific uses. pH shouldn't be tinkered with under most circumstances.
 

chadcf

Valued Member
Messages
294
Reaction score
90
Points
63
Experience
Just started
Fish poop in the water man. If nothing else please at least ignore the advise about tasting the water, yuck! Plus measuring salinity by taste is a pretty imprecise method. Yikes I'd probably find a new store after that one.
 

BRDrew

Valued Member
Messages
249
Reaction score
94
Points
78
Experience
2 years
Rocks may lower pH but they also raise kH and gH in the water. Some rocks might actually raise the pH. If you really need to make your water more acidic I would go with wood. Measure the pH if its 7.5 or lower I would say you are fine.

The salt part for a tropical freshwater tank I just call it stupid unless there is a problem.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #12

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
BRDrew said:
Rocks may lower pH but they also raise kH and gH in the water. Some rocks might actually raise the pH. If you really need to make your water more acidic I would go with wood. Measure the pH if its 7.5 or lower I would say you are fine.

The salt part for a tropical freshwater tank I just call it stupid unless there is a problem.
pH is 8.3. I am looking to add driftwood.. I like the look of it and it would help lower the pH as well.

Seachem Prime.... do I just add it to the tank following directions? I'm always afraid I'm going to dump it near a fish and they will swim in it and overdose... lol
 

BRDrew

Valued Member
Messages
249
Reaction score
94
Points
78
Experience
2 years
TombedOrchestra said:
pH is 8.3. I am looking to add driftwood.. I like the look of it and it would help lower the pH as well.

Seachem Prime.... do I just add it to the tank following directions? I'm always afraid I'm going to dump it near a fish and they will swim in it and overdose... lol
Just follow the instructions on the bottle. I have dumped it straight down on fish and shrimp and never had any problems but ideally you would want to mix it in with your tap water in a bucket and then pour it into the aquarium.
 

AxolotlAquarist

Valued Member
Messages
126
Reaction score
37
Points
53
Experience
5 to 10 years
Don't lick the water. Not only to fish produce lots of waste, there's a lot of chemicals in water conditioner. Very, very smart of you not to trust what the LFS tells you. A lot more fish would be alive today if only it wasn't for PetSmart and Petco.
 

Mcasella

Fishlore VIP
Messages
8,407
Reaction score
4,378
Points
458
Experience
5 to 10 years
TombedOrchestra said:
pH is 8.3. I am looking to add driftwood.. I like the look of it and it would help lower the pH as well.

Seachem Prime.... do I just add it to the tank following directions? I'm always afraid I'm going to dump it near a fish and they will swim in it and overdose... lol
I have dumped it directly on and into tanks with wild caught or otherwise sensitive fish (including several juvenile angelfish that were trying to see if I had food), they show no issues from it, you can safely dose prime five times the normal dose without harm.
Driftwood might lower ph, but your ph isn't terrible, others on here wuth liquid rock learn what fish can handle that and stick with them. Swinging ph is more dangerous to the fish (most rocks are either inert or will raise ph, I haven't heard of one lowering it).
Salt irritates fish, it is used to help generate slime coat when fish are sick and against certain organisms that can't handle salinity changes.
I stick by prime and sometimes stress coat (as it does what salt does without irritating the fish), I do not like other conditions when they require so much per dose compared to others.
I would never drink from a fish tank, even the cleanest one, (okay I have tasted it on a dare when i was younger, however that water was exceptionally clean), pet store tanks are going to be harboring some nasty things regardless of how many times they do water changes, and, as another member pointed out, fish use it as a bathroom.
Take what lfs people give you with a grain of salt and tuck that ruler they carry so proudly back into their pocket.
 

DuaneV

Well Known Member
Messages
2,675
Reaction score
1,845
Points
208
Experience
More than 10 years
I actually think he's okay with most of his advice other than the salt. Freshwater fish do NOT need salt added to their tank. If the store is adding salt, its to help fight against ich (ich is always present but only manifests under stressful conditions, i.e., aquarium store). There ARE better ways to deal with the PH issue, but there are definitely certain rocks that will do just that. 8.3 is on the higher side, but trying to add things to bring it down, making it exactly the same every water change, etc., is tougher than a slightly high PH. It also depends on the fish you keep.
 

Hunter1

Well Known Member
Messages
2,417
Reaction score
1,340
Points
148
Experience
1 year
As far as the application of Prime, I add mine to the bucket before I fill it, then it is diluted before it ever hits the tank and all of the chlorine is neutralized before it hits the tank too.

Reason I haven’t started using my Python yet.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom