Let's Replant My Tank!

Lynn78too

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I'm having to move my 29 gallon tank so I'm switching some of the things in it. I'll be keeping all of the driftwood in it and adding another piece. I'm looking for opinions on plants though and if things will work in the tank I have. I won't be throwing them out except for this one random plant that I got as a freebie, I think it's ugly (people selling plants, freebies of different plants are not always welcome they are sometimes thought of as ugly and often have no place in the tank, but that's just me).

My tank gets medium light, has a pH of 7.5, is at 77 degrees.

What I have that will be staying:
Staurogyne repens
Annubias nana
another variant of annubias that grows slow
Anacharis Elodia
Moss ball

We have that might be staying:
Polygonum SP Sao Paulo (the freebie)

I'd like to add some of the following but not all, which would work together with what I have, feel free to make suggestions, I just don't care for floating plants, I like them to stay at or below the waterline.
Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia
Monte Carlo Baby Tears
Rotala Indica "Bonsai"
Gratiola viscidula
Nymphoides hydrophylla Taiwan
Broadleaf ludwiga
Brazilian pennywort
Pogostemon helferi

Obviously there's no space for them all but I do want some new varieties, I'm not a huge fan of my elodia (another freebie when I got shrimp shipped to me).

Thanks for the help, I know that's a lot but I'm hoping someone out there is good with aquascaping and planting can help.

Edit: I forgot to add what kind of fish I have: I currently have a few Glofish, a betta, 5 female guppies, cory cat (going to get 2 more once the tank has been set up longer), 1 platy and 1 red phantom tetra. Both of those are the last of the groups I'd had, I won't be getting more. I also have 4 snails and shrimp. I may or may not keep the shrimp in that tank, The blue Glofish is kind of an ass and I've seen it eat them before. The other tank has non-shrimp eaters.
 

dcutl002

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  • Blyxa Japonica
  • Cyperus helferi
  • Erios if you can find/afford them
 
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Lynn78too

Lynn78too

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The Blyxa japonica ripple is unique and I like the size. Tall grasses don't usually make it with me so probably not the cyperus. The Erio is pretty as well, the name is gross, it reminds me of camboda but not as many needles (not sure what else to call them). I really like it. It's probably one you'd have to order from somewhere. I've been looking around a lot and have never seen it on any website. Does it go by another, more appealing name that I might not realize I've seen it?
 

dcutl002

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There are many varieties of Eriocaulon. Some are expensive and some less expensive. I will try to post a link from my computer after work. I'm using an iPhone now and just do not know how to copy and paste a link.

EDIT: Some Eriocaulon species are hard to find...you may have to sign the waiting list.
Han Aquatics:
Seeds:
AquaticMag:
 
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Lynn78too

Lynn78too

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dcutl002 said:
There are many varieties of Erios. Some are expensive and some less expensive. I will try to post a link from my computer after work. I'm using an iPhone now and just do not know how to copy and paste a link.
Thank you!
 

sylviepld

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I always go for the easiest plants to take care of. The following don't need a lot of light and they are very hardy. Anubis, Java Fern and Jungle Val. I like the look of Jungle Val (and other Valeria species) because it looks like tall grass growing in the tank. The anubis are cool because they will grow on your driftwood if you plant them really close to the base. You can even attach it directly onto you driftwood with a special glue they would sell at you LFS.
 
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Lynn78too

Lynn78too

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Maybe I'll try the java fern, I keep walking away from it and I'm not sure why. I've had jungle val in this tank, I currently have it in the other, it withered and died a sad, sad death in this tank and isn't doing real well in the other, it gets about 6-8" and then the stem gets all nasty and I have to cut it. I hear it's supposed to grow like a weed, I can grow weeds in my backyard but apparently that's not the same thing.
 

-Mak-

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Monte Carlo and baby tears are not the same thing Monte Carlo is an "easier" carpeting plant. Baby tears can either refer to the tall species also known as pearlweed (easy plant from what I've heard) or the carpeting kind, which requires high light and CO2.

If you can get your hands on the hydrophylla Taiwan I highly recommend it, a very pretty plant and grows very fast.
 

Jocelyn Adelman

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When it comes to Java fern, I prefer some less common varieties, like the trident and needle leaf. Still super easy to care for, but with a different look to them.
Corkscrew Val is another option , not as tall as the jungle but looks amazing.
I love my ludwigia.
Alternanthera reineckiI is another favorite, took a few months for it to adjust to my tank but now that it has it looks amazing!
Also limnophilia sessiflora or limnophilia indica (both commonly sold as ambulia) are another alternative to cambomba, much fuller and a bright green coloration. Along those lines I love parrots feather, turns an amazing red/orange, similar coloration to rotala wallachI but easier to care for. Since it's much bigger the needles don't collect all the gunk that wallichI does.
 
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Lynn78too

Lynn78too

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-Mak- said:
Monte Carlo and baby tears are not the same thing Monte Carlo is an "easier" carpeting plant. Baby tears can either refer to the tall species also known as pearlweed (easy plant from what I've heard) or the carpeting kind, which requires high light and CO2.

If you can get your hands on the hydrophylla Taiwan I highly recommend it, a very pretty plant and grows very fast.
Ah, yes, I forgot to push enter between the Monte Carlo and Baby Tears but thanks for making sure. Baby tears are cute but yeah, more work than I probably want to do at this time.

I went to the LFS and bought a small mat of monte carlo though and the ludwigia. I went ahead with the java fern but I'm still not sure how I feel about it. I'm not real good at visualizing things so I'm going to have to look and wait for a bit before I put anything else in.
 

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