LARGE tank maintenance

UnknownUser

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,592
Reaction score
1,067
Experience
Just started
Out of curiosity, how do you guys do water changes on your VERY large tanks?

I just use my little 3 gallon bucket, I can’t imagine lugging larger buckets back and forth to the tub! OH maybe a trashcan on wheels?
 

e_watson09

Fishlore VIP
Member
Messages
4,560
Reaction score
1,374
Location
Dayton, OH
Experience
More than 10 years
When I worked on my 125g planted tank I had a big siphon with a really long hose. I just put the hose right out the door into the yard. Siphoned what I wanted out then refilled with a 5g bucket. I know you can hook a siphon up to your faucet to refill the tank but I didn't like not having good control over water conditioner before the water went into the tank so I lugged buckets.

I do the same when I help my mother care for her 150g reef
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
OP
UnknownUser

UnknownUser

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,592
Reaction score
1,067
Experience
Just started
e_watson09 said:
When I worked on my 125g planted tank I had a big siphon with a really long hose. I just put the hose right out the door into the yard. Siphoned what I wanted out then refilled with a 5g bucket. I know you can hook a siphon up to your faucet to refill the tank but I didn't like not having good control over water conditioner before the water went into the tank so I lugged buckets.

I do the same when I help my mother care for her 150g reef
Wow! That would be a LOT of bucket lugging!
 

flyinGourami

Well Known
Member
Messages
2,796
Reaction score
4,025
Location
Nvm I live in the US.
Experience
Just started
Trashcan on wheels? Aquarium co-op maybe ;)?
I don't have any large tanks, but I know a lot of people use python systems. BUt I also know some that lug buckets again and again from the sink lol.
 

e_watson09

Fishlore VIP
Member
Messages
4,560
Reaction score
1,374
Location
Dayton, OH
Experience
More than 10 years
UnknownUser said:
Wow! That would be a LOT of bucket lugging!
It's honestly not terrible. The freshwater was easy since there was no salt mixing. I did it with two buckets and I don't fill them all the way to be honest. I probably put about 4g in them just so they're easier to lift to the top of the tank. I had one filling while I dumped the other. That way the water temp stayed pretty consistent too.

The salt water was a bit more tricky. I did it with three buckets and a helper haha. Once the bucket is filled mix salt. So then you have a three step bucket process at the same time. One filling, one mixing, then the other getting dumped in the tank

Once you have a system down it only takes a little while to fill them up. It becomes more like a well oiled machine refilling tanks
 

A201

Fishlore VIP
Member
Messages
4,780
Reaction score
4,446
Location
Oklahoma
Experience
More than 10 years
Once a week, I lug 13 five gal. buckets of old dirty tank water from my 120 gal. tank
outside & water trees, bushes & flowers.
Keeps the flora popping & my stomach flat. Lol.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
OP
UnknownUser

UnknownUser

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,592
Reaction score
1,067
Experience
Just started
So what I’m hearing is it is as much work as I thought and there is no easy way to do it! Haha
 

Nataku

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
1,130
Location
Florida
Experience
5 to 10 years
I do the water change on my 220 gallon (and all my other tanks) with a python ie a syphon and hose. No buckets. The syphon is directed either outside or down the closest drain - usually the slop sink, sometimes a shower drain. After I've taken out/gravel vacced the desired amount, I hook the end of the hose up to a faucet or to a coupling that I've made to my RO water storage tanks, and let water back into the tank via the same hose and syphon. I add dechlorinator before I begin adding faucet water back in, just by dumping the needed amount straight into the tank.
I mix RO and faucet water when I do water changes just because I have very hard water and so the RO helps bring that back down to more reasonable levels.

I still do top ups as needed with a bucket of RO water. Since a tank usually only needs a couple gallons there's no point hooking up the hose just for that.
 

ppls1000

Active Member
Member
Messages
124
Reaction score
20
Location
Wisconsin
Nataku said:
I do the water change on my 220 gallon (and all my other tanks) with a python ie a syphon and hose. No buckets. The syphon is directed either outside or down the closest drain - usually the slop sink, sometimes a shower drain. After I've taken out/gravel vacced the desired amount, I hook the end of the hose up to a faucet or to a coupling that I've made to my RO water storage tanks, and let water back into the tank via the same hose and syphon. I add dechlorinator before I begin adding faucet water back in, just by dumping the needed amount straight into the tank.
I mix RO and faucet water when I do water changes just because I have very hard water and so the RO helps bring that back down to more reasonable levels.

I still do top ups as needed with a bucket of RO water. Since a tank usually only needs a couple gallons there's no point hooking up the hose just for that.
How do you mix RO and tap? Or are you filling with two hoses? one RO and one tap? If so how do you have the proper mixture?
 

franklewtie

New Member
Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
8
For those of you trying to lift 5 gallon buckets to the top of the tank to dump the new water; just buy a cheap $10 pump (like those used in fountains) and some tubing and pump the water in. It will save your back.....
 

Bansmo

Active Member
Member
Messages
128
Reaction score
52
Gravel vac & water change with a garden hose
Every Saturday morning. Works well for us.
We are in an apartment. Yup we are Committed.
 

MoshJosh

Well Known
Member
Messages
627
Reaction score
606
Not HUGE, but for my 75 gallon I use a gravel vac that attaches to my sink (sort of like a python but different brand). . . Way easier than buckets
 

AllThingsPets

New Member
Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
29
Location
USA
Experience
1 year
For my 150 gallon, I syphon the water out straight into the back yard by attaching the end of the syphon tubing to a much longer tube. Then, I pour sink water into a large tub on the ground right next to the sink. (My sink has one of those extendable hose things so I just put that over the counter and it goes straight into the tub.) As this fills, I add water conditioner and anything else I want to dose with (bio boosters, iron for plants, etc.). I got a small 25w water pump from amazon for like $25 USD, and I plug that in and put it into the tub. I then attach tubing to the output and put the other end into the tank. I really like this system because I can had the tub constantly filling as water is pumped into the tank, and there’s no bucket lugging involved! I am incredibly messy and no matter how many times I have poured water I always spill, so it’s great to do less work and have less water to clean up after. I’m also quite short, and my tank on its stand is only a few inches shorter than me, so not only is it annoying to lug buckets, but also somewhat dangerous because I have to climb a ladder every time I need to pour water into the tank.

Anyway, summary is that lots of cheap 1/2 inch tubing, a small water pump, and a large bin are definitely worth investing in.
 

lojack

Active Member
Member
Messages
229
Reaction score
165
Location
California
Experience
More than 10 years
Like many others I siphon the water out with a diy python I made with a 50’ hose to water plants in the backyard. Then of all things I remove the shower head from the nearby bathroom and attach a diy adapter to it. I hook up the siphon and can refill with water pretty close to temp. It’s nice in the winter when the water from the tap is pretty cold and I can warm it up.
 

Flyfisha

Well Known
Member
Messages
931
Reaction score
790
Location
East coast Australia
Experience
4 years
I change 1100 litres a week/ 290 gallons plus the odd 20 litre bucket here and there into 26 tanks.

I have a submersible pump permanently set up in a 60 litre bucket in the corner of the fish room that pumps waste water each time the water rises out a hose to a drain outside.
This is filled with a long siphon hose and of course the odd bucket.

I have plastic tubs on the top row of the rack system.
Each week I bring a hose into the room and fill these tubs with cold water. As the room is heated after 6 days the water is the same temperature as the tanks.
Just add conditioner and tannins with a few minerals and siphon down.
I have a 100 litre and 200 litre wheelybins / trash cans on wheels. These are handy now for just change water since setting up the permanent pump in the corner.
 

Kitley

Active Member
Member
Messages
438
Reaction score
240
For my 75 Gallon is use a Python wanna be.Empty the water and clean gravel at the same time. Add dechlorinator right into the tank, then reverse the valve on the python...try to get the water temp right and fill...takes like 20 minutes. I just need to make some kind of bracket to hold the python into the aquarium so I can do it by myself.
 

Nataku

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,811
Reaction score
1,130
Location
Florida
Experience
5 to 10 years
ppls1000 said:
How do you mix RO and tap? Or are you filling with two hoses? one RO and one tap? If so how do you have the proper mixture?
One hose. I know the GPM flow (gallons per minute) of the RO tanks (1.5 GPM) as well as from the faucet (2.4 GPM). So I just hook up to the RO tank, start timer until I know desired amount has been added, then connect hose to faucet and finish filling the rest of the way.

The mixture is adjusted fairly regularly since my tap water can be pretty variable itself. So I tend to measure the tap water itself every other week and then adjust as needed. This one of the weeks when the tap is 8 ph? Cool, you only need 15-20% RO. One of the weeks where it pegs out past 8.8 ph? 30-35% RO.
 

New Threads

Similar Threads

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media

Online statistics

Members online
191
Guests online
2,358
Total visitors
2,549

Aquarium Photo Contests

Aquarium Calculator

Top Bottom