Large fish with small bioload?

elisa001

Member
Hi guys for the sake of curiosity Im just wondering if there are any medium to big fish with small bioloads. I always thought the bigger the fish the larger the bioload would be but I know this is dependent on the species of fish as well. When I say large I mean something that alone would need at least 20 or 30 gals.
 

Lucyn

Member
elisa001 said:
Hi guys for the sake of curiosity Im just wondering if there are any medium to big fish with small bioloads. I always thought the bigger the fish the larger the bioload would be but I know this is dependent on the species of fish as well. When I say large I mean something that alone would need at least 20 or 30 gals.
Well, what's difficult with that is that usually large fish get that size because of that large bioload. Some fish are dirtier than others, for example Pleco's have a very high bioload for their size because they're constantly eating. Or Discus need to be fed at least 2-3 times a day, so their bioload is 2-3x higher than a normal fish that would need to be fed once a day. There's normal bioload for that size fish, and then high bioload, not really a whole lot of "low bioload". Fish get bigger with feeding and clean water. Something like a Gourami or Angel fish would be great, Butterfly fish, some African Cichlids that don't get too big, Blue Acara's, some species of Geophagus etc.
 

MacZ

Member
Large fish with a small bioload are biologically not really feaseable. Maybe look for something that moves little or lives in cold water. Then probably you find some hits, among usual tropical aquarium fish I can't think of any species that would fit the bill.
 

FishBoy101

Member
elisa001 said:
Hi guys for the sake of curiosity Im just wondering if there are any medium to big fish with small bioloads. I always thought the bigger the fish the larger the bioload would be but I know this is dependent on the species of fish as well. When I say large I mean something that alone would need at least 20 or 30 gals.
That is difficult to find. A exaggerated example it trying to find a Lamborghini for 10 dollars. I can't think of any fish.
 

e_watson09

Member
The issue with more "big" fish is they need a big tank due to swimming alone. Not even considering bioload. Then you also have to consider the schooling requirements so needing multiple.

Bioload really only comes into play when you have a tank you're stocking with multiple fish and then you're looking into if the fish are too much for the filter which can be corrected by adding more filter capabilities.

So I believe this question really can't be answered as bioload and generic tank size do not always determine anything.
 

Donovan Jones

Member
I think your best bet is labyrinth fish if anything
 

FitSoldier

Member
I hope to achieve this with my tank. I'm hoping one large tank with just the 1 large fish would be very little bioload. I think it's very possible. I've had a 4" Green Terror alone in a 20 gallon tank in the past that I fed 3-5 times a day and at the end of the month, nitrates were 15PPM (no water changes throughout the month). When I did the water change, even the water being siphoned out was practically clear as if it was new water.

If you get an oversized tank for a single (large) fish, I think it is possible to reduce the bioload by a lot. You cannot alter the individual bioload of a fish, but you can reduce it by providing it with a larger tank alone. For example, if I were to put that same 4" Green Terror in a 75 or 125 gallon tank by itself, then its bioload will probably be very small.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Lucyn said:
Well, what's difficult with that is that usually large fish get that size because of that large bioload. Some fish are dirtier than others, for example Pleco's have a very high bioload for their size because they're constantly eating. Or Discus need to be fed at least 2-3 times a day, so their bioload is 2-3x higher than a normal fish that would need to be fed once a day. There's normal bioload for that size fish, and then high bioload, not really a whole lot of "low bioload". Fish get bigger with feeding and clean water. Something like a Gourami or Angel fish would be great, Butterfly fish, some African Cichlids that don't get too big, Blue Acara's, some species of Geophagus etc.
Your post made me wondering Lucyn.
Is it really so that Plecos are big polluters cause they are eating all day ?
Also if there is a difference in pollution (ammonia) between carnivores and herbivores? I think there is, cause I think digesting proteins gives more nitrogyn-stuff than vibers / plantmatter to me.
Is the pooh of elephants / pandabears more polluting than of big cats and so on.
Mmmmmmm would be interesting to know.
 

Donovan Jones

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Your post made me wondering Lucyn.
Is it really so that Plecos are big polluters cause they are eating all day ?
Also if there is a difference in pollution (ammonia) between carnivores and herbivores? I think there is, cause I think digesting proteins gives more nitrogyn-stuff than vibers / plantmatter to me.
Is the pooh of elephants / pandabears more polluting than of big cats and so on.
Mmmmmmm would be interesting to know.
Not sure on the nitrogen side of things but because of bio accumulation, I'd assume the higher up on the food chain the more toxins the animals food has accumulated, so carnivore poop is probably more toxic than that of their prey.
 

MomeWrath

Member
If you're talking fish that would need a 20-30 gallon tank alone, nothing that most people think of as "big" will really live well in a 20 gallon tank. However, something a small acara species or some other small cichlid (single convict maybe?) that would be happy alone would be a great medium sized "wet pet" type, and if they were in a tank that size all alone could be relatively low maintenance. Some not-so-big fish have big fish personalities!
 
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