Kribensis question

RomeoOscar

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I have a Kribensis parir in my community tank, where I also had 3 female bettas... Despite the warnings I still wanted to try if it would work out... It did not, the 2 new bettas would bully my first betta so I gave those two away, now the kribs are doing it they keep biting her fins, her tail looks bad, I'm afraid she'll die if I let this going, I'm gonna try to remove the kribs and give them away as they also keep bullying my corys... Also betta won't leave their territory, the tank is huge I set up a big space of caves and lots of floating stuff, and she keeps going to their territory and getting beaten.. I'm sure they're either trying to spawn or spawned already, female rarely leaves the cave now and the male stays outside guarding.

Now my question, how hard is it to catch those kribensis? Also, if they have already fry, or eggs... Can I raise them? Is it safe for the pair? Does it disturb then to remove them from the fry? Im gonna give them to the guy from the lfs.
 

FishGirl38

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Do you have a male/female pair? If you're not sure, the female will have a bright purple/pink stomach, whereas the male will have a duller colored stomach, but longer, pointed fins. If you do, that would probably be why they're acting up and you're probably correct in that they're spawning. In 55G tho, that is unusual - for them to chase throughout the tank, you should have enough space for them, but cichlids can be a bit unpredictable in this way.

I wouldn't say it's hard to catch these guys but it depends on your tank. If you have any caves or hiding area's where they go, they'll retreat there once they see the net. If you're having trouble, try using 2 nets, one to catch them and one to herd/scare them into the catching net. (you don't want to scare them but, ultimately they try to avoid the second moving net by swimming into the first, still net - and up they go.)

Once kribensis fry hatch, they're totally independent from their parents. The fry will feed from their egg sac for a few days to a week, then they're ready to accept powdered for small flake foods. The parents main job after they've hatched is to protect them. If you left them in the tank, the babies will swim and crowd underneath mom, dad will venture out to find food and protect the overall area, the babies usually stay by mom. If they're still in egg form, it's going to be harder to save/keep them, but it's still possible. Krib eggs are sticky, and are typically laid on a smooth rock, leave, or the glass. Mom swims around them constantly fanning them to keep water moving overtop of them. If she doesn't, fungus will grow. Once you move the eggs up and out (if they're not on the glass, take w/e decor piece they're laid on, grab a larger container, submerge that container (so it's full), put the decor piece in full bucket under water, left and transport.) Try not to pull em up from the water, you absolutely can, it usually doesn't hurt anything, but for the best success rate, I would induce as little stress/change as possible. Make sure the PH between the main tank and the fry tank are similar, and that there's enough flow for the eggs. (putting an airstone right underneath them/the decor will help).

If they're already hatched, you'd catch them and net them into the fry tank. I would use the container method described as above for this again. but it can be harder to collect moving fish in a static container, netting them out and into the new tank isn't terribly bad for them so long as PH parameters are similar, but that process CAN be stressful, and it's hard to say whether or not you won't lose a few.

In the fry tank, as a note if you're worried about fungus growing on them, you could dose methylene blue as a preventative.

Edit: as far as disturbing the parents by removing their fry, they will initially be very gumpy about this, and it may be hard to do as they're nipping and defending from your hand. But in terms of their health, it won't affect them any. Additionally, if this is these kribensis first brood of fry, they may have turned and eaten the eggs or fry before/just after they hatched. Some cichlids need a few warm up broods before they hatch and defend a successful one. My past kribs caught on quick, but they did go through one brood that hatched and then was gone (eaten) the next day. Sometimes, they need time to learn what to do/how to cultivate their fry for the first few trys.
 
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RomeoOscar

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FishGirl38 said:
Do you have a male/female pair? If you're not sure, the female will have a bright purple/pink stomach, whereas the male will have a duller colored stomach, but longer, pointed fins. If you do, that would probably be why they're acting up and you're probably correct in that they're spawning. In 55G tho, that is unusual - for them to chase throughout the tank, you should have enough space for them, but cichlids can be a bit unpredictable in this way.

I wouldn't say it's hard to catch these guys but it depends on your tank. If you have any caves or hiding area's where they go, they'll retreat there once they see the net. If you're having trouble, try using 2 nets, one to catch them and one to herd/scare them into the catching net. (you don't want to scare them but, ultimately they try to avoid the second moving net by swimming into the first, still net - and up they go.)

Once kribensis fry hatch, they're totally independent from their parents. The fry will feed from their egg sac for a few days to a week, then they're ready to accept powdered for small flake foods. The parents main job after they've hatched is to protect them. If you left them in the tank, the babies will swim and crowd underneath mom, dad will venture out to find food and protect the overall area, the babies usually stay by mom. If they're still in egg form, it's going to be harder to save/keep them, but it's still possible. Krib eggs are sticky, and are typically laid on a smooth rock, leave, or the glass. Mom swims around them constantly fanning them to keep water moving overtop of them. If she doesn't, fungus will grow. Once you move the eggs up and out (if they're not on the glass, take w/e decor piece they're laid on, grab a larger container, submerge that container (so it's full), put the decor piece in full bucket under water, left and transport.) Try not to pull em up from the water, you absolutely can, it usually doesn't hurt anything, but for the best success rate, I would induce as little stress/change as possible. Make sure the PH between the main tank and the fry tank are similar, and that there's enough flow for the eggs. (putting an airstone right underneath them/the decor will help).

If they're already hatched, you'd catch them and net them into the fry tank. I would use the container method described as above for this again. but it can be harder to collect moving fish in a static container, netting them out and into the new tank isn't terribly bad for them so long as PH parameters are similar, but that process CAN be stressful, and it's hard to say whether or not you won't lose a few.

In the fry tank, as a note if you're worried about fungus growing on them, you could dose methylene blue as a preventative.
Thanks! That was helpful. Yeah they're a male and female, pretty sure. As soon as I put the male in couple weeks ago, the female started doing her dance to impress the male. They're very adorable, yet nasty. Prefer to keep my betta and corydoras than them. Though I would still like to raise a couple males to have in the community tank. Which is what I'm gonna do, as soon as I figure out the gender ill drop them in the tank. I'm removing them today as they keep biting the betta for whatever reason, so... Hopefully there's fry under that coconut, either way, off they go. Itll take like another week to get my 20g tank assembled and the betta can't afford that time. Otherwise I'd put them in the 20g, they're awesome fish
 
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RomeoOscar

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Well, I couldn't catch the kribs! Lol I tried for almost an hour with a net, my hands, also trying to scare them into the net. Nope. Nothing. Caught the female but couldn't catch the male so.... Whatever...
I let them stay. The betta seems to be learning not to go on krib territory, her fins doesn't seem to have any recent wounds... She also noticed there aren't any more bettas around, so hopefully she'll stop being stubborn and not venture into krib territory anymore.

Below a pic of my tank so you can see how hard it is to catch a fish in there lol
 

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