Kribensis Male Or Female

ponitboss

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The first look like male to me going by the top fin is long and pointed the second may be Male also but need better picture but I'm no expert
 

chromedome52

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Both males. Long, pointed ventral fins. Only way to dependably sex the species of Genus Pelvicachromis.
 

angelcraze

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My male kribs had a slight pinkish belly, not like the female, but a bit. The red edging on the fins and pointy dorsal and caudal was the easiest way to distinguish. But first pic was hard to see fins.
 

Redshark1

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When I kept these in the 70s there was NEVER any doubt about the sex of these fish because male and female looked so different.

What has happened to them since then?

In my opinion they have had 90% of the beauty bred out of them.

Farming promotes quantity over quality, for economic reasons.
 

chromedome52

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When I kept these in the 70s there was NEVER any doubt about the sex of these fish because male and female looked so different.

What has happened to them since then?

In my opinion they have had 90% of the beauty bred out of them.

Farming promotes quantity over quality, for economic reasons.
Actually, the problem is failure of hobbyists to selectively breed their Kribs. Back in the 80s, Jim Langhammer noticed that there was quite a bit of variability in Kribs, and started breeding for fish with more spots in the dorsal fin. He was successful in getting a strain that had almost the entire dorsal of both sexes filled with large ocelli. But people are often just so tickled that they got the fish to breed, they don't think about selecting the best color/finnage/etc. for future breeding stock. I believe the greater percentage of Common Kribs in the US hobby come from hobbyist breeding rather than commercial sources. Used to have a retailer up in Milwaukee who ordered wild fish from Nigeria, and the wild individuals were surprisingly variable, but mostly quite colorful.

So blaming the lower quality of the available fish on fish farming is a rather narrow view of the problem. It may be part of it, perhaps, but it is certainly not the major problem.
 

angelcraze

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Kribs are so easy to breed and such great parents, I think it's more they just do and then the hobbyist is stuck with 60 krib babies to rehome. Happened to me, but I think my pair was gorgeous Although I don't know what they looked like in the 80s and 70s. I had some trouble though at first tryimg to rehome them because the LFS was always stocked up with so many. I had to wait until they grew a bit and were showing their colours. You could def tell which ones were female and which were male, no question. Ultimately, I had to rehome the pair because they made too many babies for me to keep up with. If I do kribs again (because they are still so beautiful if you ask me) they will be in my 90g with a predatory type fish like maybe syno to eat some of the babies and let nature take its course.
 
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