krib behavior

fishingman001

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I have 6 kribs in a 30 gallon. I want 1 pair to spawn then I will remove the others. I have the biggest of the group staying in a cave. He/she chases most of them away when they get near. I took pictures of the one he/she lets near the cave. I believe it is a female. I have no idea what the more aggressive one is.
 

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skjl47

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Hello; Here is a thought. You could pick a pair now and move the rest out. It may be that six in one tank has the reaction due to territorial behavior interfering with the spawning.
I could not do much with the photo,(photo was on it's side) but a male and female appeared to be near each other. I also think the one outside the cave a is a female. The male will be a bit larger and the trailing tip of the dorsal will be pointed. The female will have a more rounded belly and her dorsal will end in a round tip. If the male allows her around, then she is likely his pick.
He is aggressive as he is trying to establish a territory. A 30 gallon is plenty for spawning but small for a male with a territory.

I have induce kribensis spawning in 30 gallon tanks many times. I usually set up at least two potential spawning areas andhave had the male dig a nesting site at two. Once he makes a nest the female apparently has the final say if it suits her.

I wrote a post for a different forum about setting up a kribensis spawning tank and will see if i saved it.
 

skjl47

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Kribensis mating (OLD POST)
Hello; The pair will court for a time before the actual mating takes place. They can sometimes be seen swimming near each other and will do a sort of waggle or dance for a bit. During this time the male will dig out some nesting sites. (I always used halves of broken flower pots suck into the substrate.) (I found that at least two such pots to be helpful.) (I also came to use sand substrate for a kribensis breeding setup as it seemed easier for the male to dig and move about.) After the male digs some nesting sites the female will check them out. For some reason she will pick one and they will finish cleaning the nest to her satisfaction. They will mate in the nest and usually the female has placed the sticky eggs on what would be the roof of the nest cave (the underside of the flower pot). The eggs stick. The male would fertilize the eggs. When from 20 to 50 or so eggs are laid and fertilized, the male leaves the nest cave. He will stand guard near the nest but remain on the outside a few inches away. The female will stay in the nest fanning and cleaning the eggs. (If you have positioned the mouth of the flower pot right some of this behavior can be observed.) When the eggs hatch they will likely drop to the floor of the nest cave and wiggle around for a while as they absorb the remaining yolk sac. The female will stay with them and the male should remain on guard near the nest. Once they become free swimming you should see the male and female escorting a small cloud of fry around the tank as they forage for food.
 

skjl47

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Hello; Let me add that one practice that has worked well for me is to lower the water level to about half way in a spawning tank. I usually start an infusoria culture at the first sign of actual eggs. By the time the eggs hatch and the fry start foraging for food the infusoria should be ripe. I would then add a little of the culture a couple of times a day by pouring it into the tank. Aslo fresh water can be added a bit each day. This way you do not have to try the sometimes tricky manuver of trying to siphon the tank with tiny fry possibly getting sucked out for a time. Kribensis fry are large compared to many other species and this is less of an issue than is would be with perhaps zebra danioes.
 

skjl47

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Hello; (ANOTHER OLD POST) To protect fertilized eggs and tiny egg layer fry, I have used a sponge filter until they grow out some. I then use a hang on back filter powered by air bubbles with a mesh over the intake. The air bubbles can be adjusted to control the flow of water.

I also start with a low level of water in the breeder tank. This allows the addition of fresh water and/or water from an infusoria culture during the first critical days of providing tiny food. I have observed new fry grazing on the surface of a mature sponge filter in the days after pouring infusoria water into a fry tank. The infusoria culture and ground powdered food that I use will cloud the water a bit for a few days, but give the fry a good supply of starter food. Within reason cloudy water is not bad in a fry tank, it does need close attention and the occasional addition of fresh water. By the time the tank is full, the fry are often large enough for it to be possible to siphon some old water out (sometimes with a mesh over the end of the tube) and begin water changes. I also put some floating plants, like hornwort, in a fry tank. Fry seem to find things to graze on the surface of the plants. I have raised many batches of danio this way.
 
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