Koi Id & Question

dojafish

I know we don't have show quality koi, and that's probably what makes it difficult trying to name the varieties we currently have in our pond.

The butterfly (first photo, closest to me), I suspect to be either Kujaku or Goshiki; seems to have a white base with very heavy red pattern on his dorsal side and face, reticulation that's black on the red and blueish-gray on the white. His fins are mostly red with white tips.

The kodama (second photo, center fish), I suspect to be Kage Miso AsagI Ginrin; white base with blurred out blueish-gray reticulation and occasional glimmer of glittery scales in certain lighting. I thought he maybe Kage Matsuba but the white is not metallic at all.

I have really poor quality photos because they move a lot and were staying on the far opposite side of the pond. So... not really expecting much verification responses tbh lol.

I've seen a couple people say 1,000 gallons per fish, but while I was doing extensive research much of it was saying 100 sq.ft. (750 gallons) per fish, at least. I'm a little conflicted because people saying 1K gallons are Fish VIP or something like that, leading me to assume that they're a seasoned fish keeper. My question is if going by gallons more accurate than going by square feet? Or is this kind of like... square feet if you're gonna make the pond deep enough (at least 4ft.) or make it 1,000 gallons for each fish if it's going to be a little more shallow? Please she'd some clarity here. I'm new so I'm questioning a lot from my book learning lol.

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junebug

I did similar research on pond size a while ago because hubby and I used to have a koi. I didn't get a single definitive answer because it's all so subjective based on adult size of the koi strain, the purpose in keeping them, and the skill level of the person keeping them.

I would personally only have one koi in a 1000 gallons (I have a 600-700gal pond that was WAY too small for our 1.5ft Koi girl.) But in 1200 gallons, two might be appropriate. In 1500 gallons, 4 might be appropriate.

I think it depends more on the footprint and depth of the pond more than the actual gallonage.
 

goldface

I agree that it’s very subjective. Many things are, actually. For instance, some say the typical, crystal clear koi ponds with over filtration isn’t the best for these fish. Mud ponds with perhaps something to oxygenate the water with are the ideal setup for a truly healthy koi. Seeing carp—both common and grass—foraging naturally in their natural habitat, I lean more towards the latter. The saying, “there are more than one ways to skin a cat” applies the same to fishkeeping.
 

junebug

Haha yeah, my pond is a mud pond. For sure. The filter doesn't really filter. Live plants do.
 

hoseki

I don't have an absolute figure for how many gallon per koi but I believe that just doesn't tell you anything without considering the filtration system, flow rate, aeration, feeding rate and feeding qty etc. There are some ponds that are 1000-2000 gal but they can grow koi to over 30". At the back, in most cases, they all have proper pond design, good filtration systems, high turn over rate and regular maintenance quite often. The best way to tell whether your pond is overloaded is to monitor your pond with regular water testing. Ideally, if the ammonia & nitrite are all the time zero and the nitrate is below 40 ppm (of course even better if it is all the time below 10 ppm), then you can still add in more koi to your pond or feeding more food until some day the nitrate builds up faster & faster (over 40 ppm in a few days time). Then what you can do is doing water change more frequently, implementing water dripping, cut down your feeding, reducing your koi loading or expand your filtration system. So you don't have to guess but keep testing and recording the result would tell you what is going on with your pond.
I do have 350 gallon system whereby I can keep 100 small koi(4"-6") and feeding them 3 times a day and every time 1-2 full handful of koi food but have to do water change 2 times a week or even water change every 2 days depending on the situation. Growing them for another 2-3" is not that difficult but then you will have to move them to bigger tanks later if you want them continue growing. That filtration system is already 100 gallon with turn over rate probably 3 to 5 times an hour.
I also have another pond around 3300 gallon with around 27 koi ranging from 16" to over 24". I feed them 3 times a day and around 8-10 handful of food each time as I want to grow them. Depending on their behavior and eating characters, some grow faster and others slower. I have koi growing from 12" to 18" in around 4 months time. The pond has 2 separate filtration systems, heavy aeration and turn over rate more than 3 times an hour. Trade off is I have to do water change every few days.
If you are really serious about koi keeping, rather than just putting money to build big ponds, it is more important to invest in your filtration systems. Keeping koi alive and keeping koi in high quality is 2 separate thing. In most cases, koi colour fading away is a symptom that your water chemistry is not good.
 

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