Keeping cherry shrimp?

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MercuryTheBlueBetta

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If I want a cherry shrimp tank (no bigger than 5 gallon, preferably 2.5ish) good for raising fry and keeping up a population, what do I need? Is 2.5 gallon large enough? Do I need a filter, heater, etc?
 

86 ssinit

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I’d say go for the 5. Use a filter and a heater. Substrate of your choice, plants. Plants like westeria anacharis hornwort and java Moss are all good choices. Thing with a shrimp tank is it need to be running for about 6 months before you add shrimp. A good bio-film and algae growth is needed. So start the tank with some dwarf Cory’s or any of the nano fish.
 

Crimson_687

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I myself have a 5.5 gallon shrimp tank, and IMO I wouldn’t go any smaller. I once tried keeping these in a 3 gallon. The tank gave me more issues then it was worth. In fact if you can I would recommend a 10 gallon or more.

Also the tank will have to be well established before you get shrimp. If you try keeping them in an underestablished your shrimplet survival rate will be low. You could use bactor AE to increase survival rate, but you have to cycle the tank anyway and shrimp should not be a first choice for a newly established tank as they are prone to parameter spikes and will not tolerate ammonia or nitrites
 
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MercuryTheBlueBetta

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Crimson_687 said:
I myself have a 5.5 gallon shrimp tank, and IMO I wouldn’t go any smaller. I once tried keeping these in a 3 gallon. The tank gave me more issues then it was worth. In fact if you can I would recommend a 10 gallon or more.

Also the tank will have to be well established before you get shrimp. If you try keeping them in an underestablished your shrimplet survival rate will be low. You could use bactor AE to increase survival rate, but you have to cycle the tank anyway and shrimp should not be a first choice for a newly established tank as they are prone to parameter spikes and will not tolerate ammonia or nitrites
What types of issues did you encounter with the smaller tank?

86 ssinit said:
I’d say go for the 5. Use a filter and a heater. Substrate of your choice, plants. Plants like westeria anacharis hornwort and java Moss are all good choices. Thing with a shrimp tank is it need to be running for about 6 months before you add shrimp. A good bio-film and algae growth is needed. So start the tank with some dwarf Cory’s or any of the nano fish.
Thank you!
 

Crimson_687

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Shrimp populations will easily outgrow a 3 gallon, and the tank would be too small to have enough biofilm to support the population, so the amount of supplements needed to support your shrimp would (in such a small tank) lead to parameter spikes and increased water changes needed, which would also mean (bcs the tank is small) you are more likely to have pH and temp spikes.

Not saying it can’t be done, just that bigger is better, especially me as a student I simply don’t have time for tanks will difficult maintenance.
 

abbytherookiehuman

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A smaller tank is harder to maintain. Think of ammonia and other chemicals like cordial or food dye. If you put in cordial with a little water it will be too strong but if you put it in with a lot of water it won’t be so strong. So with a smaller tank even small amounts of harmful chemicals can make a big difference. Bigger tanks are easier to keep stable. A five gallon can be used but i wouldn’t go any smaller. They’re pretty simple and so are their needs. They need stable parameters just like any fish. Get a heater you can set to about 24 degrees c (~75 f) a sponge filter with an air pump is a popular filter for shrimp as the babies won’t get sucked up. Try using a dark and fine substrate to bring out colours but at the end of the day it’s really down to your preference. They love java moss as they can eat the microorganisms and hide in it, especially the shrimplets. They will eat most fish foods, especially sinking pellets like algae wafers. Other plants that are easy are Anubias nana and rotala just to name a couple. They aren’t too high maintenance.
 

ROFEA

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I have three shrimp tanks (2.5, 5 and 10). My 2.5 (fluval spec 3) does well and shrimp multiply in it like the other tanks. I would not start out with more than 3-5 neos in there though, the numbers will quickly go up. It has an amazing filter on it and water changes are very easy when you have less. I just had to add a mesh on the filter vent to prevent babies going in. I keep it planted with shrubby plants, upright plants and floating plants so the shrimp have different areas to explore.
 
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