Just Received A Free 175 Gallon Aquarium.

Futurek

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Ok as the title says I received an aquarium plus stand that was used for free. It is only about a year old and and is still water tight. Now the only experience I have ever had with aquariums before is with a little 15 gallon tank that has crayfish in it. Now I have no idea the size of filter I should be using or what other equipment I need for this huge tank. Can someone please help me.
 

Crispii

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Lucky you! I would love to get a 175 for free!

Some equipments that I recommend:
-Sump tank (for filtration)
-300 watt heater (depending what type of fish you want to keep, you may need a heater)
-Lid (would rather be safe than sorry as all fish can jump)
 

smee82

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I would definately look at adding a sump if possible or you probably will need a couple of canister filters. You might also need powerheads to increase water circulation depending on the filtration.

But the main thing you need is to decide on what type of tank you want so you can figure out what substrate, deco and lights you will need.
 

jdhef

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Welcome to FishLore! Best of luck with the new tank!
 

max h

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If the tank has been drilled go with sump filtration, if not a pair of canister filters. The Fluval FX series filters are beasts. A pair of FX6's would do the job for you.
 

JayH

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Not to be a wet blanket about the gift you received, but I think you're going to quickly find out that the tank is often one of the least expensive elements required to make a properly functioning aquarium. You're going to need a stand, a top, lights, filter(s), substrate (gravel/sand), heater(s), hardscape decorations (wood, rocks), and maybe plants. You could easily spend $500 on plants alone for a tank that size. You don't necessarily have to, but you could, and without going absolutely crazy about it. I'm not trying to discourage you, just to make you aware of what lies ahead. Hopefully at least some of this came with the tank. A stand for a 175 gallon tank isn't of much use without the tank, so perhaps that is already sorted.

If you do this correctly, it's going to be a very long process. You're not going to have fish swimming in your new tank next week. Or next month. So it would be a very good idea to do a lot of research. Decide up front what kind of livestock you want in the aquarium. That will guide some of your decisions. Read up on types of filtration (mechanical, biological, and chemical) and the methods of accomplishing those. There are many options. You'll waste less money if you figure out ahead of time what the right choice is for you and the fish you want to keep.

Already in this thread you've received some good advice, but you're probably asking yourself, "What has a pump in my basement got to do with my aquarium?" Read about sumps. Read about canister filters. I would caution you that YouTube is filled with both good advice and people who have only a vague clue of what they're talking about, yet don't let that stop them preaching on a topic. This most definitely applies to people talking about their sumps.

I suggest looking up Pond Guru videos on YouTube. He sells Biohome filter media, so be aware he has a vested interest in the product he talks about, but a lot of his videos center on principles of filtration, including the nitrogen cycle, so there's good info there even if you don't buy into the idea of Biohome media.

Jay's Aquarium (no relation) has a number of pretty good videos explaining how filtration works. They're worth watching.

Do the research up front and you'll find making informed decisions about many of the choices ahead much easier.
 

max h

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What @JayH said is true, a big tank can get real expensive quick. Now for me when I was getting my big tanks there is a few corners you can cut. Substrate you will need in the range of about 300 lbs, to do this cheap use pool filter sand for white or Black Diamond Blasting Sand for black. Both of these products start at about $8.99 for 50 lbs. If you live in a climate that stays hot most of the year like I do, I got 2 500 watt heaters from eBay for about $15. Lighting maybe a little pricey but check out eBay for Beamsworks DAseries lights and I have heard the Nitecrew lights are also pretty good. I think may Beamsworks DA 72" lights where about $80 each. If tank lids are missing egg create for office lighting is cheap at the hardware store, it keeps jumping fish in. Plus I can feed the fish without opening the lid, the downside is a little more water evaporation. Filters I won't skimp on, if you can wait for the weekends that pet stores do major sales you can find the FX6 for $299 and the FX4 I have picked up at $199. After thanksgiving would be a good time to really shop for those. Also keep an eye on Facebook market place and also Aquarium groups in your area. Craigslist is also something to check from time to time.
 

JayH

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If tank lids are missing egg create for office lighting is cheap at the hardware store, it keeps jumping fish in. Plus I can feed the fish without opening the lid, the downside is a little more water evaporation.
Another option is polycarbonate greenhouse panels. You can get a 4'x6' double-wall 6mm panel for ~$45. It cuts easily with a hacksaw. For a large tank you might want to go with 8mm as it will be less floppy than the 6mm. It's only a bit more expensive. Amazon sells plastic hinges that can be glued to these panels to make a hinged top for easy feeding accessing. Credit to Cory from Aquarium Co-op for the idea.
 
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Futurek

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Thanks everyone. A little update which i forgot to put in the original post was that it came with lights and a stand. the whole thing is only about a year old. I did find a cheap 120 liter tank which i think i am going to turn into a sump. But i have not decided on fresh water or salt water. I love in germany and I kind of want to make a tank stocked with native fish found here in germany but i do not know yet. I have a ways to go before fish at the moment.
 

JayH

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The last time I bought some egg crate grating it was about $15 and the quality was horrible. Going back thirty years this stuff used to be fairly heavy duty. You could practically walk on it without it breaking. The stuff I got last time was junk. I had to pull at least a dozen of them off the shelf before I found one that wasn't broken. The panels would easily break around the edges just moving them. Absolute junk compared to what used to be readily available.

That was partly why I mentioned the polycarbonate. It won't break in daily use. Plus it's solid, so no evaporation issues.

Thanks everyone. A little update which i forgot to put in the original post was that it came with lights and a stand. the whole thing is only about a year old.
That's great! It will save you a lot of money.

I did find a cheap 120 liter tank which i think i am going to turn into a sump.
There is a recent conversation here about designing a freshwater sump. You might find it useful.
 
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