It’s a baby snail!

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MrBryan723

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A baby ramshorn. Some consider them pets, others pests. They are hermaphrodites so they can reproduce asexually, so beware a population explosion lol.
 
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I’ve heard their reproductive habits are limited to amount of food. What do they eat? Same as my nerites? I have very little algae in my tank and my corys + platy pretty much eat everything at the bottom of the tank, so there’s not too much food in there for snails. I worry sometimes my nerites don’t get enough but they haven’t died yet so who knows!

When will it be old enough to reproduce? How big will it be? Will I see the eggs?
 

MrBryan723

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They more or less are. They will compete with the nerites for food. Mostly it's algae or the bb that they eat, along with any decaying plant matter. I don't know when they reach maturity, they get up to around nickle sized at the largest i have ever seen, but dime and just under dime are pretty common..
The eggs would look like a gelatinous glob with lots of little white/brown things inside it. Depending on where it lays, you would be able to easily identify them if ypu can see them.
My personal opinion is since you already have the nerites, you might want to remove this one. Completely your choice.
 
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Hm, I might just see how it plays out... the nerites don’t find my blanched veggies, but the ramshorns would... I could always remove them when they’re on the veggies if I hate them, right? I’m so against hurting living things, and I know no one else who would take him!
 

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UnknownUser said:
Hm, I might just see how it plays out... the nerites don’t find my blanched veggies, but the ramshorns would... I could always remove them when they’re on the veggies if I hate them, right? I’m so against hurting living things, and I know no one else who would take him!
That's a big maybe. The reason so many consider them pests, is because once they establish a population, they are exceptionally difficult to remove without poisons.
 
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MrBryan723 said:
That's a big maybe. The reason so many consider them pests, is because once they establish a population, they are exceptionally difficult to remove without poisons.
Dang, alright, if I see it again I’ll take it out. You’re right, I probably don’t want them.
 

MrBryan723

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Sorry, not trying to rain on your parade. You could always toss it in a mason jar on top of your tank or by a window in a cool room.
 
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MrBryan723 said:
Sorry, not trying to rain on your parade. You could always toss it in a mason jar on top of your tank or by a window in a cool room.
Haha no worries, I’m glad I found out now! I just hope I can find it again before it starts making eggs!
 

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I have them in all my tanks with no explosions. I also have bladders too. I like them in my tank because it adds to the variety. If you like them keep them.
 
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MissPanda said:
I have them in all my tanks with no explosions. I also have bladders too. I like them in my tank because it adds to the variety. If you like them keep them.
You don’t think they’ll starve my nerites?
 

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UnknownUser said:
You don’t think they’ll starve my nerites?
I have nerities and rabbit snails with mine. I love snails haha and everyone has enough food. You should be throwing broccoli or veggies in for your nerites anyways. It helps get them extra calcium, and you'll see all the snails munching when you do that. They share haha
 
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MissPanda said:
I have nerities and rabbit snails with mine. I love snails haha and everyone has enough food. You should be throwing broccoli or veggies in for your nerites anyways. It helps get them extra calcium, and you'll see all the snails munching when you do that. They share haha
I’ve tried a few times with spinach but they don’t seem to find the spinach before the fish had eaten it all and they never found the cucumber either. I’ll try broccoli next though :)
 

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they can be a pest but they help airate the gravel so can be good or bad eather way its up to u what u do with it
 

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MrBryan723 said:
They are hermaphrodites so they can reproduce asexually, so beware a population explosion lol.
I haven't found this to be true for ramshorns. I've had one in a tank with no population growth in several instances, and have never seen cases one one turning into more.

Bladder snails, on the other hand, will certainly self-reproduce. I gave one of each to two friends. Now both have massive populations of bladder snails, buy still just one ramshorn.
 
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YellowGuppy said:
I haven't found this to be true for ramshorns. I've had one in a tank with no population growth in several instances, and have never seen cases one one turning into more.

Bladder snails, on the other hand, will certainly self-reproduce. I gave one of each to two friends. Now both have massive populations of bladder snails, buy still just one ramshorn.
I found an article online sort’ve explaining this... it says that most of the time the snail, when it is moved to a new tank, has already had contact with other ramshorns and therefore is already fertile. You can hardly see them when they’re too small to reproduce so the chances of getting one that hasn’t already been fertilized is small. So then it lays fertile eggs, they hatch, and boom more snails!
 

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