Is this tank safe rock and what kind is it?

Bluejay010101

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Hi all,

I just wanted to make sure this is tank safe, and get it identified if possible. I did the vinegar test and it did not fizz. But research keeps pointing me to some kind of iron composition which would be toxic, correct? It could rust?

It's in a 5 gal, filtered, heated (80), cycled betta tank.

Thank you so much!
 

!poogs!

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No one has answered you, so I will do my best. Maybe that will get some people thinking.

I would ask myself, where did I find the rock? Did you pick it up locally? That being the case you may want to do some quick online research to determine what kind of rock and soil in in your area.

If you are concerned you have a piece of pure iron ore, it is highly unlikely it is pure iron, as iron ore has may other types of solid rock in its compound, some of which are heavy metals. Also iron ore isn’t pure iron. Iron ore is crushed, smelted, oxidized, and compounded with other elements to create an actual piece of iron.

Things to consider. That rock is millions of years old. If it is a piece of iron ore and it has been exposed to the elements for who knows how long, it is possible for the iron in the rock to oxidize. Be interesting to know the landscape where you found it, or did you find it at a landscape yard? The closer to the surface a rock containing heavy netals is found, the more likely it has experienced oxidization.

So if that is a piece of oxidized iron ore what does it mean for your aquarium It means it could leach iron oxide into your tank. Iron oxide is actually used in higher concentrations to remove phosphates from aquariums. This is a good thing.
Because iron is so naturally occurring in nature, it is very likely we all have some iron oxide in the rocks in our tank. Just like any other mineral, tomuch is a bad thing. If the rock gives your tank water a reddish tinge, get it out of there. I doubt it will. If the you found the rock near an old iron mine were it is likely to contain high concentration of heavy metals, don’t use it.

Personally I don’t like putting rocks in my tank I pick up. BUT, a lot of people in the hobby do it and there is nothing wrong with that at all. I guess I would keep an eye on it and see what happens. If you did the obvious testing, I wouldn’t be overtly concerned.

Just my thoughts. I don’t have any credentials or letters behind my name in geology.
 
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Bluejay010101

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!poogs! said:
No one has answered you, so I will do my best. Maybe that will get some people thinking.

I would ask myself, where did I find the rock? Did you pick it up locally? That being the case you may want to do some quick online research to determine what kind of rock and soil in in your area.

If you are concerned you have a piece of pure iron ore, it is highly unlikely it is pure iron, as iron ore has may other types of solid rock in its compound, some of which are heavy metals. Also iron ore isn’t pure iron. Iron ore is crushed, smelted, oxidized, and compounded with other elements to create an actual piece of iron.

Things to consider. That rock is millions of years old. If it is a piece of iron ore and it has been exposed to the elements for who knows how long, it is possible for the iron in the rock to oxidize. Be interesting to know the landscape where you found it, or did you find it at a landscape yard? The closer to the surface a rock containing heavy netals is found, the more likely it has experienced oxidization.

So if that is a piece of oxidized iron ore what does it mean for your aquarium It means it could leach iron oxide into your tank. Iron oxide is actually used in higher concentrations to remove phosphates from aquariums. This is a good thing.
Because iron is so naturally occurring in nature, it is very likely we all have some iron oxide in the rocks in our tank. Just like any other mineral, tomuch is a bad thing. If the rock gives your tank water a reddish tinge, get it out of there. I doubt it will. If the you found the rock near an old iron mine were it is likely to contain high concentration of heavy metals, don’t use it.

Personally I don’t like putting rocks in my tank I pick up. BUT, a lot of people in the hobby do it and there is nothing wrong with that at all. I guess I would keep an eye on it and see what happens. If you did the obvious testing, I wouldn’t be overtly concerned.

Just my thoughts. I don’t have any credentials or letters behind my name in geology.
Thank you so much for responding!

I picked it up in Arkansas iirc, near a river/creek with other rocks, nowhere near an iron mine or anything like that. It was an interesting color and caught my eye. I did the vinegar test and no fizzing. Sterilized it and soaked it before it went in. Everything seems good so far, no leaching, no pH shifts either.
 

!poogs!

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Bluejay010101 said:
Thank you so much for responding!

I picked it up in Arkansas iirc, near a river/creek with other rocks, nowhere near an iron mine or anything like that. It was an interesting color and caught my eye. I did the vinegar test and no fizzing. Sterilized it and soaked it before it went in. Everything seems good so far, no leaching, no pH shifts either.
It a nice piece of rock. You should google the geology of the area you found it in and see what they say about the sediment stone in that area.
 
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Bluejay010101

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!poogs! said:
It a nice piece of rock. You should google the geology of the area you found it in and see what they say about the sediment stone in that area.
Ty! From what I searched:

"The bedrock of the Ozark Plateau portion of Arkansas is made up of sedimentary rocks. Most of these rocks fall into just six major types: limestones, dolostones, cherts, sandstones, siltstones, and shales."

Interesting!
 

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