Is this normal in swordtails? Question 

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Sprinkle

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My two female swordtails hang out beneath the surface with clamped fins.
My other female, subordinate female, she clamps or even sometimes higher them up and holds them like that. They do sometimes come and swim.
Maybe you Oriongal know what's going on?
 

Oriongal

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First answer of course is checking water parameters.

Past that, I have some females that routinely do this as well, even in the 300-gal pool.

I have some that only do it when heavily pregnant and nearing birth time.

A subordinate female will often keep her dorsal fin down when in sight of a dominant female, to show deference.

May also want to ask coralbandit and emeraldking, they've been raising livebearers much longer than I have.
 
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Oriongal said:
First answer of course is checking water parameters.

Past that, I have some females that routinely do this as well, even in the 300-gal pool.

I have some that only do it when heavily pregnant and nearing birth time.

A subordinate female will often keep her dorsal fin down when in sight of a dominant female, to show deference.

May also want to ask coralbandit and emeraldking, they've been raising livebearers much longer than I have.
I just filled my 31 gallon tank yesterday and used Prime. So water is all perfect for now.
And she is pregnant, maybe this is causing her to do this and also hide?
 

Oriongal

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Most of my females do try to get off by themselves when it's time to give birth. (Or to get away from a more dominant female, or to get away from a too-amorous male.)

If you just set up the tank, are you using the same filter, or media from the same filter? Prime only neutralizes for 24 hours or so.
 

juniperlea

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I have male only swordtails with no aggression/stress issues. They can slip into reverse without changing gears, and from four feet away, get excited when I wave my arms at them.:D
 
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juniperlea said:
I have male only swordtails with no aggression/stress issues. They can slip into reverse without changing gears, and from four feet away, get excited when I wave my arms at them.:D
My usually do the same :D That's why I love them
 
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Sprinkle

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Oriongal said:
Most of my females do try to get off by themselves when it's time to give birth. (Or to get away from a more dominant female, or to get away from a too-amorous male.)

If you just set up the tank, are you using the same filter, or media from the same filter? Prime only neutralizes for 24 hours or so.
No, I didn't use the same media. My old filter is dry and in a plastic bag ready to be sold.
 

coralbandit

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You need to test or at least be able to .Your tank is brand new now and you have to go through the whole cycle thing .
Clamping is usually stress or illness if it is more then occasionally ..
Who else is with the swordtails?
 
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Sprinkle

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coralbandit said:
You need to test or at least be able to .Your tank is brand new now and you have to go through the whole cycle thing .
Clamping is usually stress or illness if it is more then occasionally ..
Who else is with the swordtails?
I also have these unknown two cichlids, but I'll give them to my lfs.
 

Oriongal

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Sprinkle said:
No, I didn't use the same media. My old filter is dry and in a plastic bag ready to be sold.
That means that you're basically starting your nitrogen cycle over from scratch. The beneficial bacteria that convert ammonia to nitrite, and nitrite into nitrate primarily colonize the filter media.

You will need to stay on top of your water parameters (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate) on a daily basis until your nitrogen cycle is re-established in the new tank and filter. If you have another mature tank running, and can borrow some material (not all of it, just some) from its filter to add to your new filter, that will help speed up the process.
 
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Oriongal said:
That means that you're basically starting your nitrogen cycle over from scratch. The beneficial bacteria that convert ammonia to nitrite, and nitrite into nitrate primarily colonize the filter media.

You will need to stay on top of your water parameters (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate) on a daily basis until your nitrogen cycle is re-established in the new tank and filter. If you have another mature tank running, and can borrow some material (not all of it, just some) from its filter to add to your new filter, that will help speed up the process.
I know about the Nitrogen Cycle.

I have a sponge filter, but I really don't want to cut up these sponges.
 

Oriongal

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Then I'd say you can try one of the bacteria starter kits, or otherwise treat this like a fish-in cycle, test daily and water change as needed.

Swordtails are pretty tough but ammonia, nitrites and nitrates can still kill them. And clamped fins can be the early sign of that as well.
 

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Do you have anything with the swordtails?

A tonic dose of aquarium salt can be helpful for livebearers to heal fins and also to help alleviate some of the toxins associated with cycling like nitrite poisoning.

But salt is not for all fish unless it's a necessity. Just livebearers do well with it IME.

Edit: What are the 2 chiclids, South American? African? When can you rehome them?
Edit again: Not sure what the chiclids are, but I think it's safe to say they are Central American. Maybe severum?

The tonic dose of salt is not a huge deal, but better to do it without the chiclids bc they don't need it.
Also i'm thinking of they are chasing the livebearers, the livebearers could be hiding or avoiding the chiclids.

If you have a test kit, it might be helpful to post results
 
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