Is This Ich?

LongIslandFishGuy

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Not sure if this is Ich or not. I look at my tank pretty frequently and didn't notice these white spots a few hours ago. Both my Hoplos have 3-4 of these spots too.

No other fish in my tank have these spots.

If this is ich, what do I do? I have a 10 gallon tank currently being used as a grow out tank for my Shovelnose Lima. I might need to just treat this whole tank if this is ich.

2 of 3 filters push down small air bubbles. Is it possible these are bubbles that are sticking to their bodies? Not to sound stupid, but they look identical.
 

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Ed204

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Hi there,
If you're not aware the fish you call "hoplos" are actually Silver Dollars.


There are many different kinds of Silver Dollars. Your silver dollars are metynnis lippincottianus. They are one of the smallest species, only growing up to 5 inches. They are one of the spotted variety of Silver Dollars.

Your Silver Dollars do not have ich, since they are called Silver Dollars when light is shined at them they sometimes reflect white spots on their body, my Silver Dollars always show their white spots due to my lighting.

Expect your Silver Dollars to have some red coloration over the years and the black spots to develop more,
 

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Personally, I also own silver Dollars 5 to be exact however they are not the same species as yours.

My Silver Dollars are the common variety or also known as Metnnyis Argentus.

How many Silver Dollars do you have?
They need to be at least in groups of 6 so that they feel safe.
Also, they will do much better in a 50 gallon. As I stated above they grow up to 5 inches a pop and your 10 gallon will not work in the long term.
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Hi there,
If you're not aware the fish you call "hoplos" are actually Silver Dollars.


There are many different kinds of Silver Dollars. Your silver dollars are metynnis lippincottianus. They are one of the smallest species, only growing up to 5 inches. They are one of the spotted variety of Silver Dollars.

Your Silver Dollars do not have ich, since they are called Silver Dollars when light is shined at them they sometimes reflect white spots on their body, my Silver Dollars always reflect the light.

Expect your Silver Dollars to have some red coloration over the years and the black spots to develop more,
I know these are Silver Dollars, I also have 2 Hoplo Catfish that have a few of these white spots on them. I know the "shiny spots" you're referencing, but I cannot help but think this is ich. My Oscar and JD also have 1-2 tiny white spots on them.

I've done some research since this post. I think the most harmless way to go about this is to raise the temperature. I just raised it from 78 to about 85. Ich or not, I'd rather nip this in the bud. I've read that the more spots, the harder it is to get rid of. I don't want to potentially lose fish over this.

I'm going to monitor both tanks. I hope my 10 gallon doesn't get it (if it is ich)!
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Personally, I also own silver Dollars 5 to be exact however they are not the same species as yours.

My Silver Dollars are the common variety or also known as Metnnyis Argentus.

How many Silver Dollars do you have?
They need to be at least in groups of 6 so that they feel safe.
Also, they will do much better in a 50 gallon. As I stated above they grow up to 5 inches a pop and your 10 gallon will not work in the long term.
10 gallon is my spare tank. My main tank is a 125.
 

Ed204

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I know these are Silver Dollars, I also have 2 Hoplo Catfish that have a few of these white spots on them. I know the "shiny spots" you're referencing, but I cannot help but think this is ich. My Oscar and JD also have 1-2 tiny white spots on them.

I've done some research since this post. I think the most harmless way to go about this is to raise the temperature. I just raised it from 78 to about 85. Ich or not, I'd rather nip this in the bud. I've read that the more spots, the harder it is to get rid of. I don't want to potentially lose fish over this.

I'm going to monitor both tanks. I hope my 10 gallon doesn't get it (if it is ich)!
Do the white spots appear only when they reflect with the light or are they always there? Are they scratching on the decor or heater?
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Do the white spots appear only when they reflect with the light or are they always there? Are they scratching on the decor or heater?
They spots are always on the fish, even in the dark. Everyone in the tank is displaying their normal behavior. I honestly check on the tank 3-4 times per day. I think I caught this extremely early.
 

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They spots are always on the fish, even in the dark. Everyone in the tank is displaying their normal behavior. I honestly check on the tank 3-4 times per day. I think I caught this extremely early.
Since you are already raising the tempreture you can add aquarium salt as well. That should kill off the parasite.
What are your water parameters?
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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I haven't checked in a few days, but I was having a cycling issue for a few weeks. I have 0 ammonia, low level nitrite, and like 40 nitrate. I do about 2-3 50% WCs per week and dose with Prime and Stability. I shouldn't have gotten these fish, I thought I saw a spot on a SD in the tank but thought nothing of it. It's been about 2 weeks, I guess it's coming out now.
 

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I haven't checked in a few days, but I was having a cycling issue for a few weeks. I have 0 ammonia, low level nitrite, and like 40 nitrate. I do about 2-3 50% WCs per week and dose with Prime and Stability. I shouldn't have gotten these fish, I thought I saw a spot on a SD in the tank but thought nothing of it. It's been about 2 weeks, I guess it's coming out now.
That's a very high level of nitrate are you sure it's 40? Because 2-3 water changes a week would definetly reduce it by now. The ideal nitrate level is 5-20 anything above 20 is considered dangerous
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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That's a very high level of nitrate are you sure it's 40? Because 2-3 water changes a week would definetly reduce it by now. The ideal nitrate level is 5-20 anything above 20 is considered dangerous
I'm going to be honest, I have no idea how to lower that number. That number was much higher a week or 2 ago. I cleaned out one filter's media in a bucket with tank water and it slightly went down.

If I test my test my water's nitrate levels before and after a 50% WC I rarely see any change in nitrate. And yes I vacuum the gravel! Idk what else I can do... I mean I'm doing big water changes 2-3 times per week already.
 

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That's a very high level of nitrate are you sure it's 40? Because 2-3 water changes a week would definetly reduce it by now. The ideal nitrate level is 5-20 anything above 20 is considered dangerous
Anything above 20 is not dangerous at least not in freshwater. I have been looking into nitrates quite a bit lately and the common things I came across is that lower than 20 is great, lower than 40 is ok, 60 to 80 is where you need to be concerned. Fish are pretty tolerant of nitrate however we should do our best to keep it low.

OP, do you run purigen? It removes dissolved organics and can help control nitrate buildup. Also what is your nitrate at the tap? Seems like you must have some as your levels don't budge after multiple water changes.
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Anything above 20 is not dangerous at least not in freshwater. I have been looking into nitrates quite a bit lately and the common things I came across is that lower than 20 is great, lower than 40 is ok, 60 to 80 is where you need to be concerned. Fish are pretty tolerant of nitrate however we should do our best to keep it low.

OP, do you run purigen? It removes dissolved organics and can help control nitrate buildup. Also what is your nitrate at the tap? Seems like you must have some as your levels don't budge after multiple water changes.
I have heard of Purigen but heard that tanks can become dependent on it and throw off the cycle of the tank. I just recently upgraded from a 55 to a 125. My nitrates only became an issue when I moved everything to the bigger tank. I typically had 20ppm nitrate. I can't get it lower than 40ppm recently.

In regards to the ich, the SDs definitely brought it in. I questioned a few fish in the tank they were in, but I got a great deal on them so I said why not??? I will DEFINITELY keep my 10 running as a quarantine tank moving forward for new fish. I don't want this issue again. I adjusted my 300 watt heater to 87 last night. It was in the low 80s this morning. The other heater in the tank is a preset 200 watt one. I just ordered another 300 adjustable heater so I can stablize the high temperatures. I also bought ParaGuard. The ich looks like it has spread more since last night. Still normal behavior.
 

Bizarro252

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I have heard of Purigen but heard that tanks can become dependent on it and throw off the cycle of the tank. I just recently upgraded from a 55 to a 125. My nitrates only became an issue when I moved everything to the bigger tank. I typically had 20ppm nitrate. I can't get it lower than 40ppm recently.

In regards to the ich, the SDs definitely brought it in. I questioned a few fish in the tank they were in, but I got a great deal on them so I said why not??? I will DEFINITELY keep my 10 running as a quarantine tank moving forward for new fish. I don't want this issue again. I adjusted my 300 watt heater to 87 last night. It was in the low 80s this morning. The other heater in the tank is a preset 200 watt one. I just ordered another 300 adjustable heater so I can stablize the high temperatures. I also bought ParaGuard. The ich looks like it has spread more since last night. Still normal behavior.
Good luck! I was looking into using paragaurd for ich the other day when someone else was looking for stuff to use, I have some around to dip new fish in. Just FYI on the Seachem forum they recommended treating for 3 weeks.

I have never heard of a tank becoming dependent on purigen, it might just be they are so used to what it does for their numbers they freak when they go up after removing it. Its not a chemical, it just adsorbs organics from the water, so it should not create any sort of dependence.

That is very strange that you only saw this issue after you moved to a larger tank, did you add more fish as well? More bioload and food is a one way street to Nitrates
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Good luck! I was looking into using paragaurd for ich the other day when someone else was looking for stuff to use, I have some around to dip new fish in. Just FYI on the Seachem forum they recommended treating for 3 weeks.

I have never heard of a tank becoming dependent on purigen, it might just be they are so used to what it does for their numbers they freak when they go up after removing it. Its not a chemical, it just adsorbs organics from the water, so it should not create any sort of dependence.

That is very strange that you only saw this issue after you moved to a larger tank, did you add more fish as well? More bioload and food is a one way street to Nitrates
I fellow YouTuber that I speak with said I don't need ParaGard if I'm heating, so I'm going to cancel my order.

I heard Purigen kills off BB because it's less "food" for them to eat.

I did add more fish........... o_O
 

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I fellow YouTuber that I speak with said I don't need ParaGard if I'm heating, so I'm going to cancel my order.

I heard Purigen kills off BB because it's less "food" for them to eat.

I did add more fish........... o_O
Well there is where your Nitrates are coming from

Purigen removes organics before they can break down, I am sure they reduces the food availability a tiny bit, but the fish literally exhale ammonia lol, so they should have plenty to eat to keep a nice colony going
 
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LongIslandFishGuy

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Well there is where your Nitrates are coming from

Purigen removes organics before they can break down, I am sure they reduces the food availability a tiny bit, but the fish literally exhale ammonia lol, so they should have plenty to eat to keep a nice colony going
Maybe I'll try it, I'm alittle nervous too!
 

Ed204

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Anything above 20 is not dangerous at least not in freshwater. I have been looking into nitrates quite a bit lately and the common things I came across is that lower than 20 is great, lower than 40 is ok, 60 to 80 is where you need to be concerned. Fish are pretty tolerant of nitrate however we should do our best to keep it low.

OP, do you run purigen? It removes dissolved organics and can help control nitrate buildup. Also what is your nitrate at the tap? Seems like you must have some as your levels don't budge after multiple water changes.
You are not completely correct. IMO, the ideal nitrate level for both saltwater and freshwater is 5-20, that way your fish will be healthy. Also, don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Different fish can tolerate different nitrate levels hence, the uniqueness of each one.
If I were you I would keep the Nitrate level at 5-20ppm, just to be safe.

And since you have a potential ich infestation I would raise the tempreture and add aquarium salt.
 

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You are not completely correct. IMO, the ideal nitrate level for both saltwater and freshwater is 5-20, that way your fish will be healthy. Also, don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Different fish can tolerate different nitrate levels hence, the uniqueness of each one.
If I were you I would keep the Nitrate level at 5-20ppm, just to be safe.

And since you have a potential ich infestation I would raise the tempreture and add aquarium salt.
Thanks. I guess most of my research has been centered on mbuna keeping so naturally a bit higher lol. I wish I could get below 20 and stay there...i think that would require 50 percent a day changes since my tap already has 5 to 10
 
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