Is This Hobby Worth All The Trouble? :p

danelch
  • #1
And trust me there is a lot of trouble in this hobby lol
Ok so I've thought about it since a very long time. We people do a lot of hard work for the hobby but still unfortunately end up in major 'losses' at times :/
And when and IF we do end up with a good-looking tank ,we then start to suffer from the symptoms of MTS and we're then on our way to research and hardwork for a new project.
I'm not saying I'm giving up on the hobby. I just wanna know if you people out there feel like me at times too.

One other thing that had been bothering me was : why fish ? I mean I've always loved nature ,be it plants ,animals ,etc but why especially fish ?
The only answer I could come up with is : all the mess they create is confined a limited space ,so it is kinda neat ? Lol
Anyway, looking forward to seeing what you guys have to say about it
 
GreekGills
  • #2
For me, that's the beauty of this hobby: The challenge
 
iDon'tCare
  • #3
Excuse me if I sound offended, but I'm not. I once thought like this when I was a wee little pesky child, I was starting to get sick of my goldfish in .5g bowls, I now have tanks housing community fish that I'm proud of. There is much I learned in the hobby with my limited selection and that being that this hobby is worth as much 'trouble' as you're willing to go through, and how much you see it as trouble. Do you admire your fish tank but just slightly irritated when having to scrub your aquarium? Or do you just walk past your aquarium seeing it as just any piece of furniture that's a hassle to take care of? Maybe if you only want fish because you're not in the mood to care for other animals, forget pet keeping as a whole but if you are into it for the passion, then it's worth every bit of it. Really, same could be said about a dog. Why would you pick up poo in your yard? Why bother walking it when you're sick?
 
ParrotCichlid
  • #4
And trust me there is a lot of trouble in this hobby lol
Ok so I've thought about it since a very long time. We people do a lot of hard work for the hobby but still unfortunately end up in major 'losses' at times :/
And when and IF we do end up with a good-looking tank ,we then start to suffer from the symptoms of MTS and we're then on our way to research and hardwork for a new project.
I'm not saying I'm giving up on the hobby. I just wanna know if you people out there feel like me at times too.

One other thing that had been bothering me was : why fish ? I mean I've always loved nature ,be it plants ,animals ,etc but why especially fish ?
The only answer I could come up with is : all the mess they create is confined a limited space ,so it is kinda neat ? Lol
Anyway, looking forward to seeing what you guys have to say about it

Their are two types of people in this hobby. The ones who keep fish as pets because they look nice and then the aquarists that keep fish because they are passionate about FISH.

I think you fall into the top category op. Obviously I don't know you but judging from your post that's what I think.

I don't keep fish because the mess they create is easily confined to a small place. I keep fish because they are fascinating creatures
 
danelch
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
I totally understand what I sound like by the way I asked the question. I guess I couldn't explain the question the way I meant to. So I don't blame you all
I do love my fish! I am passionate about them!
There's in fact, a factory of ideas running inside my head regarding my next project.

In a nutshell, I guess what I was trying to ask is : the hobby is a challenge,and I'll be honest,I've learnt a lot from the experience so far as well, so what keeps you hungry for more ?
Hope that clears up my as a lazy pet-keeper
 
Smalltownfishfriend
  • #6
It's like keeping an entire little planet in a container!!! It's awesome to watch... I find that of all my pets the fish are definitely one of the easier ones to take care of... Once you get it figured out... They are beautiful and so much fun to watch!!! I can not imagine not having fish!!
 
goldface
  • #7
Even before I kept fish, people knew I had a weird obsession with them that I couldn’t control. Literally. I was very passionate and because of that I was kind of a prik. I’ve destroyed relationships over fish. I was like Moby Dick in search of his White Whale.

In comparison, I’ve found peace in fish-keeping. It’s still an obsessive hobby, but not one that has taken over my life.
 
Mary765
  • #8
I think it's because looking into a tank is like looking into a snippet of another world, something you cannot get from a bird cage or rabbit hutch, or even a reptile enclosure. The sea is always so colourful and mysterious too, it's like taking a chunk out of an alien planet to keep in a glass box!

Furthermore, There's science behind it too. Aquariums create the perfect balance of risk and reward. You know how people get addicted to scratch cards? Well that's because they spend a lot of money on them and win a little bit back if they are unlucky or a lot back if they are lucky. It's the same with our money but for dopamine (happy chemical) instead of a cash prize. We drown a lot of money into the hobby hoping to strike lukcy and create the perfect tank to satisfy all your needs, but of course the odds of that are one in billions (like the lottery) so we either sink more money into the same tank in hopes of increasing our odds (more scratch cards), or we go out and try a new tank (like trying a new scratch card brand)

You see?
 
CanadianJoeh
  • #9
I agree that there are two types of fishkeepers.

There's the kind that keeps them as a decoration, as previously mentioned, and will often hire a LFS to do weekly maintenance.

And there's the kind that crams a tank into every corner of their house. I'd have to say I'm guilty.

You know something's wrong when you're showering with your fish....

Still easily worth every bit of trouble IMO.
 
Redshark1
  • #10
Wow, so many insights from such amazing people and I liked them all. I didn't even fully realise the truth in Mary's first paragraph myself so its the one I enjoyed most.

It took a long time for me to achieve success but it has come. I have some very old Clown Loaches now and I started a planted tank 10 years ago which is still successful.

15 years ago I helped my school by stepping in to look after their two aquaria which failed and I now have an aquarium at work which people enjoy.

So my motivations are watching my fish (enjoying the beauty), achieving success (and keeping it going) and sharing with others (and showing a good example).

Somebody saw me cleaning the fish and said "That doesn't need cleaning does it?". So I said "Exactly!" and she got what I meant. The aquarium should never look as if it desperately needs maintenance!

On the other hand at the Christmas party a colleague told me she used to keep Discus but they took up too much time. I thought that was partly the point i.e. that you were spending your leisure time doing something you enjoy?

I like this quote. My LFS man says there are two types of people interested in fish. Fish keepers and fish buyers.
 
JoeCamaro
  • #11
I think it is worth it.

I used to think fish were boring pets, after all you can't (or shouldn't) pet them, play with them, do things you can do with a dog, cat, bearded dragon... But when I visited a neighbor who had a fish tank I couldn't get my eyes off of it. I was captivated. Not that I never saw fish tanks before, but at that time, on that day, on that specific phase of my life I fell in love with it.

Also, I think that troubles (not huge ones) fuel the hobby. It is awesome when everything is running smoothly, but when something happens and we have to find a solution, help a fish somehow, change something, read about something that's going on in our tanks, that makes it more interesting, at least to me. Knowing that I am needed, that I can make a difference feels good.

Plus the reward of looking at your creation and feeling peace and happiness makes it all worth it.
 
Redshark1
  • #12
I used to watch the aquarium at primary school when I was a kid. That's when I was hooked. I think I was the only kid who gave it any attention. It was in a porch next to the library which I also enjoyed. I did do sports and musical instruments so I wasn't a loner. I don't know how I found the time.

It was a typical small community tank with one example of every colourful fish species available (the wasn't much choice in the sixties). I remember the most active fish was a single Zebra Danio and the (totally unsuitable but no LFS would allow you to leave the shop without one!) Chinese Algae Eater put it in its place and left a bloody circle on its tail.
 
CanadianJoeh
  • #13
danelch I really hope none of us would question your passion for your fish, as that would be none of our business and rather quite rude.

You clearly care about your fish and just because one might have a tough day in the fishkeeping hobby doesn't mean their passion for this fascinating hobby is affected.

We support you fully!
 
danelch
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
danelch I really hope none of us would question your passion for your fish, as that would be none of our business and rather quite rude.

You clearly care about your fish and just because one might have a tough day in the fishkeeping hobby doesn't mean their passion for this fascinating hobby is affected.

We support you fully!
I'm really glad you thought about my whole situation this way!! Really appreciate that!
And that's exactly the way my situation has been lately. This one tank has given me a lot of headache over the past few months and the problem is one in a million. Literally! Let's not discuss it cuz it has been dealt with for good (hopefully)!
And there's no doubt my fascination and love for this hobby is only increasing!
Looking forward to making an Amazon biotope in the future soon! Maybe I'll let you guys know!
 
alykat
  • #15
There have been a few times I’ve considered of doing fish keeping in a professional capacity instead of medical school. Such is the passion I have for the little guys but I think that what fascinates me about them are the fish that look at you thru the glass and you can see the intelligence in their eyes.
 
chromedome52
  • #16
I do not see things the way others here do. I also see two types of people who keep fish, but I divide them differently. I see those who keep fish as pets to look at, and that includes pretty much anyone who keeps community tanks; and I see those who seriously want to learn the science behind them, how they are related to one another, genetics, evolution, how they behave, which by default includes how they reproduce. I do not keep them as pets, but as fascinating learning opportunities.

That does not mean that I do not appreciate the beauty of life. And I certainly don't perform cruel experiments on them, either. But when I'm trying to breed a new species, I will try many different environments, foods, and stimulI to see what they want. I start with what others know, and then build on it with experience and experimentation.

Having to care for the tanks is a necessity. They have to live and be healthy to breed. Over the decades I've learned a few little tricks that make it easier, but it will always be work. Nothing comes freely (something that today's society seems to have trouble understanding), and you have to decide if the reward is worth the effort.
 
danelch
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
There have been a few times I’ve considered of doing fish keeping in a professional capacity instead of medical school. Such is the passion I have for the little guys but I think that what fascinates me about them are the fish that look at you thru the glass and you can see the intelligence in their eyes.
I'm a medical student too
Probably in a country far away from yours but still...

Also there was someone else ^ who mentioned dopamine maybe he/she is a med student/neurologist as well ?
Maybe it's something more common in science students. Makes sense too if you ask me !

I do not see things the way others here do. I also see two types of people who keep fish, but I divide them differently. I see those who keep fish as pets to look at, and that includes pretty much anyone who keeps community tanks; and I see those who seriously want to learn the science behind them, how they are related to one another, genetics, evolution, how they behave, which by default includes how they reproduce. I do not keep them as pets, but as fascinating learning opportunities.

That does not mean that I do not appreciate the beauty of life. And I certainly don't perform cruel experiments on them, either. But when I'm trying to breed a new species, I will try many different environments, foods, and stimulI to see what they want. I start with what others know, and then build on it with experience and experimentation.

Having to care for the tanks is a necessity. They have to live and be healthy to breed. Over the decades I've learned a few little tricks that make it easier, but it will always be work. Nothing comes freely (something that today's society seems to have trouble understanding), and you have to decide if the reward is worth the effort.
You look way too experienced and seriously into the hobby! Good luck with all that! Do let us know if you get a new species named after you

I'm into the whole thing ESPECIALLY cuz I love the whole the idea of seeing a whole, beautiful, well-balanced ecosystem with all members of a food chain in there! I wish to achieve the same in all my tanks pretty much!!
 
alykat
  • #18
The nice thing about fish keeping and medical school is the flexible schedule of tank maintenance I knew I was passionate about fish when I didn’t begrudge the 1am water changes
 

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