Is this dropsy?

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Kunsthure

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It's kinda hard to tell from the pics but one sure sign is "pineconing" where the scales stick out from the body and look like a pincone. I think that's a late sign, though. Not knowing how he used to look it's hard to say if he's swollen but he doesn't look as huge as I've seen fish with dropsy. Try not feeding him for a day or two and see if he slims down. I have a platy that looks like he has dropsy when he gets too much to eat. Good luck!

-Lisa
 

gremlin

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Pretty little fantail. No, I don't think it's dropsy. The skin/scales are still nice and smooth. With dropsy, the scales will stick out. The body of the fancy goldfish does pooch out. That is just how they are. It looks like yours is just growing normally. Especially if the appetite and activity level stay the same.
 

Lucy

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Your dropsy question along with Gremlins response has been moved out of your other thread and combined with the thread you started this afternoon.

Please ask question in one place, it's less confusing for you to keep track of the answers as well as themembers who want to help.

Thanks!

Very cute goldy, fantails are my favorite.
 

kreuztraeger

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Whatever the case I'm going to enact some preventative measures. I'm increasing the temperature in the aquarium to about 30°C and I've added the recommended dose of aquarium salt to help Pom Jr.'s immune system fight off any bacteria.

I've looked up the ideal temperatures for nitrifying bacteria and apparently 30°C is at the high end, but still within the ideal range. Now I just have to wait and watch.

@Lucy the Moderator - Sorry about posting it in two places. I'll create a new thread next time a situation like this comes up.
 

Kunsthure

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When I asked about dropsy treatment, I was advised against salt. It seems to be the prevailing opinion here that salt is bad. I can't really explain why, though I'm sure a search would turn up answers about it.

-Lisa
 

kreuztraeger

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So far, he doesn't seem lethargic, he is still eating food and he isn't sinking to the bottom. His scales just look like they might be about to start pineconing out. I really hope it's just from feeding him too much. He begs a lot.
 

Kunsthure

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It very well could be overfeeding then. You can't give in to the begging, it's really detrimental to their health. I keep reading here that a fish's stomach is as big as their eye so they really need a lot less than we think. Many people here don't feed their fish one day each week. I'd withhold food for two days and see if he skinnies up--don't worry about him being too hungry, he'll be just fine, fish can easily go two weeks without food. Like I mentioned in my last post, I have a platy that looks like he has dropsy if he eats too much and he skinnies right up after a fast.

-Lisa
 

kreuztraeger

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I've been fasting him all day, along with my other fancy goldfish because he started floating from gas. I've been feeding him goldfish flakes because he's a little too small to eat the regular goldfish food I think.

Here's what I know about digestion in goldfish:

Feed amount about the size of the eye. (That 5 minute thing never works.)
Digestion takes about 16 hours at room temperature.
At low temperatures digestion stops completely. So,
At high temperatures the process must speed up.

(Since I increased the temperature of the aquarium to about 28°C, he's been pooping nonstop. My other fish seems to have cleared his system as well.)

Problem(s) solved?

@Kunsthure - You into art?
 
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gremlin

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I don't like flakes for goldfish. Anything that floats only on the surface of the water is going to make it more likely for the goldfish to gulp air when it eats. Pellets come in a variety of sizes and either floating or sinking. I like the floating pellets as they float just below the surface of the water. This way you can easily remove any extra food and the goldfish can get the pellet without gulping any air. Also, several members have suggested giving pieces of cooked shelled peas to help with goldies digestion. I guess it helps keep things moving.
 

Kunsthure

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Yes, I'm into art, how did you guess? Heehee

Shelled green peas are great for *ahem* getting things moving, so maybe a bit of peas can help. All of my fish tear into them and fight over them then promptly poop green poop. I give them all peas every other night, even the fry.

Wow, 16 hours to digest food?! It takes humans about 8, with proper diet of course. It's crazy that such a small thing could take so long. My platys and mollies poop green poop rather quickly after eating peas, like less than an hour. I keep their temp about 78-80, so maybe that plays a part.

ETA: I don't cook the peas. I take them right out of the freezer, roll them between my hands to loosen the shells and then cut them into as small of pieces as I can.

-Lisa
 
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kreuztraeger

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Yes, I'm into art, how did you guess? Heehee

Shelled green peas are great for *ahem* getting things moving, so maybe a bit of peas can help. All of my fish tear into them and fight over them then promptly poop green poop. I give them all peas every other night, even the fry.

Wow, 16 hours to digest food?! It takes humans about 8, with proper diet of course. It's crazy that such a small thing could take so long. My platys and mollies poop green poop rather quickly after eating peas, like less than an hour. I keep their temp about 78-80, so maybe that plays a part.

ETA: I don't cook the peas. I take them right out of the freezer, roll them between my hands to loosen the shells and then cut them into as small of pieces as I can.

-Lisa
Human digestion takes about 2 days unless your colon is removed, so goldfish are still faster than us. Of course everything gets faster at higher activity levels, and higher temperatures for goldfish. (That's why I added a heater to my goldfish tank, set around 26 degrees C.)

I can't remember whether or not I've ever gotten a goldfish to eat shelled peas before. I just know mine tend to not like vegetables. Maybe they're just taking after their owner!
 
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