Is This Danio Ok?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish and Invertebrates' started by chadcf, Jun 15, 2018.

  1. chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    I've had it like 6 months now. It seems like for a while it's been pretty fat and it's still looking, to me, huge. Much bigger than it's more streamlined tankmates. Could it be a female full of eggs? Or just fat? It eats and swims fine, the scales aren't sticking out like I see described for dropsy...

    Sorry they're a little blurry, hard to get a good picture of a moving target through glass.
     

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  2. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogTooWell Known MemberMember

    Could be an eggy female, yes. But the arched back says, also could be bloated. How long has it been like this?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    I mean it's hard to say... I had 6, two disappeared, out of the 4 left this one looks fat. Several of them looked fat for a while and I can't really tell them apart so I can't tell if this is one that has been fat for a while or a different one. Given two seem to have died I'm a little more worried about this one, although it's acting normally. Suffice it to say it has probably looked like this to some extent for a few months maybe? But hard to know.

    You know looking at it a little closer it does look like some scales on the belly are standing out...
     




    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2018
  4. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogTooWell Known MemberMember

    If it's been a few months, it's not an eggy female, but it could be an egg-bound female. Meaning she can not release or absorb her eggs.

    Bloat can cause scales on the bloated area to stick out. Looking at the fish from overhead, and seeing the scales stick out from that angle is usually how we identify dropsy. The fish's entire body would have scales sticking out, like the texture of a pine cone. Can you take a close up picture of the fish from directly above?

    Dropsy is a symptom, not a disease. Like pneumonia in humans. It's when the fish's body fills with fluid and bloats. But when a fish is displaying signs of dropsy, it's oftentimes too late.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    I only see a few things on the bottom of the belly, definitely does not look like a pinecone from above. I've also learned photographing fish is really hard!
     

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  6. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    Is the danio more gold or silver compared to the others? This can indicate the gender, I believe. Gold-colored zebras are usually males and silver-colored zebras are usually females. Do you see this particular fish eat more than the others?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    That one is more silver. I don't particularly notice any more eating but danios are all little pigs so they all devour any food put in, it's a big free for all.
     
  8. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    Ah, okay. There's a chance that this is a female and she's egg bound. Has she been chased by the other danios a lot? Just in case this is constipation, I'd cut down on how much you feed these guys and maybe feed her a pea after a 3-day fast. What are your water parameters? How big is the tank? Are you planning on purchasing more danios?
     
  9. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    Who knows, they all chase each other and for the most part you can't tell one from another... I don't think I can really fast it unless I remove it to it's own tank by itself. I guess I could just fast everyone but the cardinal tetras in there are pretty young and I just put in two baby peacock gudgeons and I'm somewhat reluctant to fast the young ones. I did add two more though to get back up to 6 danios.
     
  10. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogTooWell Known MemberMember

    Do you have a breeder net or a breeder box that you can keep this one danio in for a few days? It will be much easier to fast it that way, and you only have to net it once. It’ll be fine like that. Being separated from the school for a few days won’t hurt it.
     
  11. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

  12. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    Ok I'll go to the store tomorrow and see if I can find one. Then fast for a few days and feed a deshelled pea?
     
  13. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    Yep. Good luck :)
     
  14. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    Ok it is in a floating "hospital" pen. Poor thing. But I guess if they can live in a bag in the mail for days they can survive in this for a few days.

    What should I expect to see? I mean it seems like after 3 days it's unlikely she'd be fine? What do I do if it looks the same after some time in quarantine with no food?
     
  15. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    You may want to be on the lookout for protruding scales while she’s separated. Did we ever ask you your parameters? If not, could you provide those as well as the tank size and temperature? You’ll expect the swelling to go down after the three-day fast. The fiber in those peas will help her poop more, which will allow her to shrink. Overall, she’ll look much skinnier. You may want to increase the fast to five days just in case. These fish can last weeks without food. If she’s the same after quarantine, then there’s definitely a problem outside of constipation/bloating. Come back to us and we’ll help you out. Feel free to update us every day with pictures of her belly. Good luck :)
     
  16. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    Water is good, 0 ammonia 0 nitrites 10-20ppm nitrates (~10 from the tap, goes up to ~20 after a week when I do a roughly 50% water change). PH is about 7.8. The tank is at about 75.8 degrees, it's a 38 gallon bowfront.

    Should I give it peas now or wait a few days?
     
  17. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    Wait a few days. You can feed her the pea after the fast.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    chadcf

    chadcfValued MemberMember

    Ok. Also to complicate matters, I'm going on vacation next friday for 10 days. There will be a pet sitter here that will feed the fish but she doesn't actually know anything about fish, so if it doesn't clear up by then nature might just have to take it's course...
     
  19. Adriifu

    AdriifuWell Known MemberMember

    Try giving specific directions for the pet sitter.
     
  20. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogTooWell Known MemberMember

    Tell the pet sitter to only feed the fish twice a week. That way you don't have to deal with them being overfed, because you know they're going to feed heavy handed. Fish in the wild go for days, or sometimes up to a week, week and a half, without food. It will be good for all your fish to get a couple weeks of light feeding like that. Use one of those day of the week pill container things and pre-portion out the fish food.
     




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