Is This Cyanobacteria? Question

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Ronniethewitch, Aug 22, 2019.

  1. Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    Im referring to the green on the driftwood. If it is cyanobacteria, is it harmful to my fish? If it is harmful, how do I get rid? Will boiling the driftwood again do the trick?

    Add: I quite like the look of it on the driftwood so if it's not harmful to my fish babies, I'd quite like to leave it. Obviously, fish health is more important than aesthetics.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
  2. jdhef

    jdhefModeratorModerator Member

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    Hard to tell from the photo, but it kinda looks like it is. Is it a blue-green color.

    I don't know that it's harmful, but it is unsightly and can be difficult to get rid of. I believe that treating the tank with an antibiotic will kill it off (it is a bacteria after all). I've also heard that you can spot treat with hydrogen peroxide, but I'm unsure exactly what the process is. Maybe someone who knows will see this and reply.
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    Thank you very much for the reply. - actually quite like the look of it! But it's very important to ensure its not going to harm the fish.
     
  4. A201

    A201Well Known MemberMember

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    Cyanobacteria is harmful to fish if they were to eat it, but the good news is that "fish usually won't eat it".
    I can't determine if the growth on the log is Cyanobacteria. From my experience, the nasty stuff grows into slick shiny mats. I've had to occassionally dig it out of my gravel over the years, but it never became a big problem.
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    O dear. I am watching a platy eat it right this very minute.

    So far it is just the one piece of driftwood that is quite tall and so very close to the aquarium light. My understanding is that cyanobacteria need an abundance of nutrient and light to grow. I started using homemade fertiliser tabs within the last two months (all-purpose miracle grow) and as I said, this particular bit of driftwood is very tall.

    I am doing regular tank maintenance today so will have a scrub of the driftwood and boil it again, then look closely to see if there is more in the tank. Thankyou very much for the reply. Not going to take chances with their health.
     
  6. richie.p

    richie.pFishlore VIPMember

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    This will be useful to you
    Aquarium Cyanobacteria
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    Thankyou for sharing that. I really want to avoid using antibiotics for fear of losing my cycle but there is definitely good information in there. Will start the good fight immediately.
     
  8. richie.p

    richie.pFishlore VIPMember

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    I use H202 on problem algae with good results
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    I am off to the chemist now to see if I can buy it here in England. thank you
     
  10. richie.p

    richie.pFishlore VIPMember

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    Didn't realise you were in the uk, yes you can get it try for the 6% in any chemist I use 12% but get it from Lincolnshire
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    Bit of a drive for me, without a car. The chemist is just around the corner. My fellas just leaving in an hour to work abroad...soon as he's left I'm off to the chemist and back to do waterchange and gravel vac on the aquarium. Fingers crossed! (Such a shame, I do love the look of it)
     
  12. A201

    A201Well Known MemberMember

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    It appears that the green algae looking growth is located on the upper most portion of the log. The closest position to the light. Its only logical that normal green algae growth would occur there.
    Not a good idea to let the fear of Cyanobacteria lead you to a knee jerk reaction. Green algae growth is a good indicator of a healthy tank and in most cases green growth in a tank isn't Cyano.
    I like the look of green algae on my rocks & DW. My African Cichlids graze on it, keeping it short & in check. Just don't panic. If you like the look, watch & evaluate before taking actions to remove it. Here's a pic of algae on one of my rocks. Without the algae growth on it the rock would be bone white. 20190822_082532.
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    I love the idea that it's a sign of a healthy tank and the general positivity of your answer! and because I quite like the look of it, both on your rock and my driftwood, it would be nice to ignore other advice.
    BUT
    I don't want dead fish. If it's not green algae will there be warning signs in time to keep fish from suffering?
     
  14. richie.p

    richie.pFishlore VIPMember

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    Thing is the molly is eating it and probably the other fish have as well and nothing as happened so far, there may be something in what @A201 is saying
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    I
    This is true.

    A small patch has been there for just over two weeks but in the last three days it has spread quite quickly because my fella has been home and when he is off work having a bevy, he leaves the lights on quite late (4hrs more than usual)

    Going to look up the symptoms of fish with cyanobacteria before I do this water change and start scrubbing the green off. I figure I should have hydrogen peroxide in my fish cabinet anyway- so going to buy that now, my fella's just left. That way I have the tools to fight the nasties when or if it's time.

    Thank you everyone for the input. If anything else comes to mind please do share.... I have come to learn that fish keeping is a lot of guesswork and trial and error. Just so long as my fish aren't harmed I'm happy with learning on the job.
     
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    Ronniethewitch

    RonniethewitchValued MemberMember

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    Update: picked up some hydrogen peroxide so it's on hand if necessary, 45% water change and gravel vac done. Cleaned inside of the glass.. No algae or cyano on the glass or gravel, only the one big patch on the top of the one tall ornament. Realised I needed to change my co2 canister...is this the cause of the green growth? Have turned the lights off early today. Going to watch my fish babies a little longer before freaking out. Everybody seems ok. Fingers crossed!
     
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