Is This Columnaris?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Disease' started by redman77, Aug 17, 2019.

  1. redman77

    redman77Valued MemberMember

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    I added a group of Denison Barbs (Roseline Sharks) to my tank two weeks ago. I just got back from a trip and now one of them has a large white discoloration on its back (see the pictures below). Other than the discoloration, it is acting fine.

    My initial thought was columnaris, but I'm hoping someone can confirm so I make sure to use the right treatment.

    Thanks very much for any insight.

    Best photo.Another good one.IMG_20190817_154041.MVIMG_20190817_152813.
     

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  2. A201

    A201Well Known MemberMember

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    That looks like Columnaris to me. IMO, best to quickly remove the infected fish, concentrate on achieving & keeping optimal water parameters, and try to save the tankmates. Antibiotics rarely cure Columnaris, the meds aren't worth wrecking the aquarium environment.
    The white patch on the Denison Barb is dead tissue killed by the bacteria. Just because one fish catches Columnaris doen't mean all will. The longer you allow the sick fish to remain in the tank the greater the chance of spreading the disease.
     
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    redman77

    redman77Valued MemberMember

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    Thank you for the helpful advice. Unfortunately, I don't have a quarantine tank so I'm going to try to treat it.
     
  4. PascalKrypt

    PascalKryptValued MemberMember

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    I would strongly advise you to get a QT anyway, even if the suboptimal conditions of a cheap, quickly tossed together tank may be negative for your ill, symptomatic fish, in the end you may end up saving all the other fish in your tank. You really should remove it asap even if you decide to treat the main tank just to be sure.

    A QT can be as simple as a food-grade plastic container of a few gallons with a small air stone. Get the cheapest, smallest filter you can find and seed some media from the main tank. Alternatively you can keep the QT uncycled and just do 50% daily water changes. Keep the tank bare and in a quiet, dark(ish) place in the house. My QTs are inside a cabinet with framed glass doors that insulates sound and light and keeps the temperature inside very stable, it really helps lower stress and makes it easier for your fish to recover.
     
  5. coralbandit

    coralbanditFishlore VIPMember

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    Catch and remove the infected fish ..Send it to the freezer ..Sorry..
    Step one of proper treatment is to remove and euth any fish showing visible infection .
    Too many years into this I will never waste my money on the recommended antibiotic cocktails again ..
    Learn about potassium permanganate. Using Potassium Permanganate
    PP is the only way I feel I have ever 'cured' columnaris ..
    The rams and Roseline have no place in the same tank ...I feel bad for my roselines because I don't cool their tank but it should be in the upper 70s if it runs like usual . They are cool water fish which would prefer lower 70s..
    The ram needs 80+..If your tank is set for them your roselines have short lives ahead of them ...
     
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    redman77

    redman77Valued MemberMember

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    I've successfully treated columnaris once before using a combination of Fluran-2 and Kanaplex, using this site as a guide: Identify and Treat Columnaris (Saddle Back Disease)

    That's a bummer to hear about the Roselines' temperature requirements. I read somewhere they could handle warm temperatures.
     
  7. TankGeek

    TankGeekNew MemberMember

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    You can use a plastic tote or large tub/bucket with a sponge filter or airstone and heater for a quarantine. Redman is right, you need to remove the infected fish asap. Columnaris is usually fatal and highly contagious.
     
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