Is this a valid fish diet?

Noroomforshoe

Hikari food products are cheap fish meals and fillers, I have not read the ingreadients of all of there foods, but both the algae wafers and the vibra bites are junk. SORRY
New life spectra Thera plus A Naturox is more ideal. Bug bites tropical or other bug bites, Xtreme is my third favorite brand choice.
 

blackwater

Would this diet work tho?
I'm planning on a daphnia greenwater culture in ajar
also I dont think that i cant chage the food cause asian parents yknow
 

ChrissFishes01

That diet is fine.

Let's be real - the most important thing about a food is that the fish eat it. A food can be loaded with nutrition, but if the fish don't like it and won't eat it, it doesn't do anyone any good. It's much better to feed a fish that's full of fillers that the fish like and eat their fill of.

Almost any fish food on the market today is good enough for most fish in terms of nutrition. I happen to prefer a lot of Omega One foods, but I feed Hikari to my Flowerhorn and have used Tetra, Xtreme, and tried some other assorted foods. None of them caused any massive difference in my fishes' health, behavior, growth, or otherwise. Because they're all good enough.

A mixture of every food on the market would probably be ideal, as far as prepared foods go.
 

blackwater

well they are eating it without any fasting so I'll take that as a yes
 

Bubbleduck

If you’re just trying to maintain adult fish and you’re not trying to breed or have maximum growth rates for juvenile fish, then all of what you’re currently feeding is fine.
 

DoubleDutch

That diet is fine.

Let's be real - the most important thing about a food is that the fish eat it. A food can be loaded with nutrition, but if the fish don't like it and won't eat it, it doesn't do anyone any good. It's much better to feed a fish that's full of fillers that the fish like and eat their fill of.

Almost any fish food on the market today is good enough for most fish in terms of nutrition. I happen to prefer a lot of Omega One foods, but I feed Hikari to my Flowerhorn and have used Tetra, Xtreme, and tried some other assorted foods. None of them caused any massive difference in my fishes' health, behavior, growth, or otherwise. Because they're all good enough.

A mixture of every food on the market would probably be ideal, as far as prepared foods go.
Sorry to say but I disagree.
A lot of fish need specific vitamins, minerals, and kinds.of protein.
Corys for instance eat algaewafers but will hardly get any nutrition out of them.
In this case there is a mix of food and then it won't cause problems.
Ot simply isn't like : If they eat it is good enough.
 

blackwater

Sorry to say but I disagree.
A lot of fish need specific vitamins, minerals, and kinds.of protein.
Corys for instance eat algaewafers but will hardly get any nutrition out of them.
In this case there is a mix of food and then it won't cause problems.
Ot simply isn't like : If they eat it is good enough.
I will also feed them the other foods via tweezers and frozen boodworms.
 

Bubbleduck

Sorry to say but I disagree.
A lot of fish need specific vitamins, minerals, and kinds.of protein.
Corys for instance eat algaewafers but will hardly get any nutrition out of them.
In this case there is a mix of food and then it won't cause problems.
Ot simply isn't like : If they eat it is good enough.
True. Lol I had to reread OP’s post to make sure that I didn’t accidentally approve of feeding Corydoras only algae wafers.
 

blackwater

I'm confused, is there anything I can do to improve. I cant buy anything new but I will look forward to any advice.
 

Bubbleduck

I'm confused, is there anything I can do to improve. I cant buy anything new but I will look forward to any advice.
After doing some research, I don’t really think so. A lot of the stuff about foods being “bad” or “low quality” are just opinions. Looking back, I realize that I accidentally fed all the fish that I kept in the past low protein and high carb diets by trying to judge a food’s quality by the ingredient list alone. Ingredient list are these food company’s strongest marketing tool.
 

DoubleDutch

I'm confused, is there anything I can do to improve. I cant buy anything new but I will look forward to any advice.
No need to buy anything new as long as you feed a variation of food.

I disagreed on the fact that it only would matter that fish eat not what they eat.
 

ChrissFishes01

Sorry to say but I disagree.
A lot of fish need specific vitamins, minerals, and kinds.of protein.
Corys for instance eat algaewafers but will hardly get any nutrition out of them.
In this case there is a mix of food and then it won't cause problems.
Ot simply isn't like : If they eat it is good enough.
I should have been a bit more specific on what I consider to be a prepared food - I'm generally speaking of flake and pellet foods, not algae wafers and dried treat items. I do agree that throwing algae wafers into tanks left and right isn't gonna do it.

I'll still stand by my statement, with that correction.
 

blackwater

Oh thank you guys!
 

SparkyJones

Sounds like a pretty varied diet, the red neon blue eyes are omnivores, the pygmy cories are technically carnivores, they will eat some algae though. I would cut that out of the diet as a food, and let them graze for it in the tank if they want it as it grows. blood worm is fine I think,,,, black worm might be easier for these little guys to manage though.

For free stuff you can feed, I'd add more insect and insect larva if you can, small ants, mosquito nymphs, fruit fly, . (I know most of this is gross, it's all free though, natural diet, and nutritious as far as protein acids and vitamins for them), small insects for them to eat.
Like simple black ants are 40-45% protein, 40-50% fats mostly from fatty acids, they are rich in iron, zinc, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus, and high content of Palmitic, Oleic and Linoleic acids, these are mostly missing for a lot of fish foods. and omivores and carnivore fish could benefit from them being added.

Whereas bloodworms are like 6-8% protein and iron, and about 81% moisture. they do have B12, ascorbic acid, beta carotene, and some amino acids.... but it's really mostly liquids and not as nutritious.

daphina, infusoria, or small scuds if you could get those going, things to forage for, some folks have an easy time culturing them, others it's an impossible task. but also helps for natural proteins and vitamins and some acids that might be lacking and a more natural diet. detritus worms maybe for the cories to work for..... overall if they can forage and hunt a bit for stuff to eat, it's a little more mentally stimulating and enriching for them.

I like the vibrabites as a staple food for most fish not a terrible choice, but as a single daily feeder for the very basics, just not for all feedings. the micropellets is similar to vibrabites nutritionally also, if the vibra is a bit too big for the red neon, the micropellet might be a better size option.
 

Bubbleduck

Sounds like a pretty varied diet, the red neon blue eyes are omnivores, the pygmy cories are technically carnivores, they will eat some algae though. I would cut that out of the diet as a food, and let them graze for it in the tank if they want it as it grows. blood worm is fine I think,,,, black worm might be easier for these little guys to manage though.

For free stuff you can feed, I'd add more insect and insect larva if you can, small ants, mosquito nymphs, fruit fly, . (I know most of this is gross, it's all free though, natural diet, and nutritious as far as protein acids and vitamins for them), small insects for them to eat.
Like simple black ants are 40-45% protein, 40-50% fats mostly from fatty acids, they are rich in iron, zinc, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus, and high content of Palmitic, Oleic and Linoleic acids, these are mostly missing for a lot of fish foods. and omivores and carnivore fish could benefit from them being added.

Whereas bloodworms are like 6-8% protein and iron, and about 81% moisture. they do have B12, ascorbic acid, beta carotene, and some amino acids.... but it's really mostly liquids and not as nutritious.

daphina, infusoria, or small scuds if you could get those going, things to forage for, some folks have an easy time culturing them, others it's an impossible task. but also helps for natural proteins and vitamins and some acids that might be lacking and a more natural diet. detritus worms maybe for the cories to work for..... overall if they can forage and hunt a bit for stuff to eat, it's a little more mentally stimulating and enriching for them.

I like the vibrabites as a staple food for most fish not a terrible choice, but as a single daily feeder for the very basics, just not for all feedings. the micropellets is similar to vibrabites nutritionally also, if the vibra is a bit too big for the red neon, the micropellet might be a better size option.
I agree with all that you said except for the protein in bloodworms vs ants. You stated the wet weight of bloodworms while stating the dry weight of the ants.

You said that bloodworms have a wet weight of 6-8% with 81% moisture. So bloodworms have 31.58-42.11% protein in dry weight.
You said that ants had a dry weight of 40-45%. Assuming they have 81% moisture too, ants are 7.6-8.5% protein in wet weight.

Bloodworms
Wet Weight: 6-8% protein
Dry Weight: 31.58-42.11% protein

Ants
Wet Weight: 7.6-8.55% protein
Dry Weight: 40-45% protein
 

SparkyJones

I agree with all that you said except for the protein in bloodworms vs ants. You stated the wet weight of bloodworms while stating the dry weight of the ants.
My bad. black ants vary from 20%-60% moisture content just collected from the ant hill. which is what I was referring to for the percentage.

freeze dried blood worms like omega ones product are Crude protein (min) 55%, crude fat (min) 3%, crude fiber (max) 5%, moisture (max) 5%

frozen bloodworm is protein 3.5%, fat 0.3%, fiber 0.7%, moisture 94.7%

the "6-8% protein and iron, and about 81% moisture. they do have B12, ascorbic acid, beta carotene, and some amino acids"
This was for live blood worms.
 

Bubbleduck

My bad. black ants vary from 20%-60% moisture content just collected from the ant hill. which is what I was referring to for the percentage.

freeze dried blood worms like omega ones product are Crude protein (min) 55%, crude fat (min) 3%, crude fiber (max) 5%, moisture (max) 5%

frozen bloodworm is protein 3.5%, fat 0.3%, fiber 0.7%, moisture 94.7%

the "6-8% protein and iron, and about 81% moisture. they do have B12, ascorbic acid, beta carotene, and some amino acids"
This was for live blood worms.
So then frozen blood worms are 66% protein and 5.66% fat in dry weight since they’re 3.5% protein and 0.3% fat in wet weight with a moisture of 94.7%.
 

SparkyJones

So then frozen blood worms are 66% protein and 5.66% fat in dry weight since they’re 3.5% protein and 0.3% fat in wet weight with a moisture of 94.7%.
I think freeze dried is the dry weight for blood worms or as close at it gets at around 55%, it's not used as a human food supplement like black or red ants are that are sold as dehydrated or powdered and at true dry weight.

But yeah, sounds right, except you wouldn't really be thawing and drying frozen blood worms, so the majority of it per feeding is moisture content unless feeding freeze dried. But yeah, thawed and stuck in a food dehydrator, it would come out in that neighborhood, a crude protein dry weight of 66.35% I think drilling into the numbers.

the problem with bloodworms is it has some amino acids like methionine [dl-methionine], l-lysine, and taurine, but lacks any of the important ones. Bloodworms have 3, none are essential. there's better options that have more value per feeding.
it's filling, and not much bang for the buck as a food nutritionally and apparently tastes great because most fish love it!
 

Noroomforshoe

You can make your own food from things in your fridge.
I added cricket flour and spirulina to mine,
But You could just get a measuring cup,
steam half a cup of veggies try to add various colors, for their varios vitamins. Try to add garlic. if you use broccoli, use the top and the stem as both parts have different vitamins. Steam half a cup of meat. I used a tilapia fillet a shrimp and a bit of chicken the size of my thumb.
Blend it in a mixer, and add some water or the water from the can of vegetables. you want a pancake mix consistency.
Pour it into a glass pan so the layer is pretty thin. bake at 200 degrees to dry it out, it takes a really long time. 5 hours when i did it. Or just let it dry in the sun. then break it into pieces and feed a little at a time. store in a tight container, preferably not a clear container.
 

blackwater

Im planning on feeding them some blanhed zucchini or cucumber soon.
 

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