Is there an "easy" live food to cultivate?

devsi

I currently have the following in my 180 Litre tank:

I'm currently feeding the whole tank NT Labs - Pro-F Nano Tropical food, with the occasional feed of frozen blood worms.

I'd like to cultivate some live food, but don't really know where to start. I was going to try Daphnia, but my fish didn't seem overly impressed when I bought some home from my LFS.

Is there an easy live food to begin with? Maybe white worms or grindal worms? Would that work for all of the fish I have?

Thanks in advance!
 

Flyfisha

Hi devsi,
Welcome to fishlore.
Both white worms and grindle worms would work for those species with grindle being a more suitable sIze. Both are easy and require the same amount of work .
Baby brine shrimp are a daily routine of ten minutes maximum per day . More work in terms of time than the worms . Baby brine are expensive long term .

Mosquito larvae are no work at all if you have room for an outdoor container. The corydoras would miss out on them however.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Hey Flyfisha! Thank you.

Both white worms and grindle worms would work for those species with grindle being a more suitable sIze. Both are easy and require the same amount of work .

Would grindle be a more suitable size because they are smaller or bigger, just out of interest?

Would you happen to have a recommended article on cultivating grindle worms? It's quite hard to know which sites/articles are good and which are bad :)

If not, I can just do some more research.

Baby brine shrimp are a daily routine of ten minutes maximum per day . More work in terms of time than the worms . Baby brine are expensive long term .

I was actually considering BBS, so thanks for that! I'm really looking for the least effort possible for the live food, so looks like it's worms :)
 
Upvote 0

Flyfisha

Grindle worms are around 6 mm / 1/4 inch long.
White worms are just over 25mm / 1 inch long.

Both eat dry cat/dog food aNd require feeding every 3 to 5 days. Fail to feed them for a week and the numbers slow down. Fail to feed them for 3 weeks and you might have lost the culture.
The soil should remain damp but not soggy. Let them dry right out and the culture is lost.

I have watched a lot of videos on these worms and many videos make it out to be a lot harder than it is. Seriously just toss in dry cat/dog/fish food that has been in water for a minute or ten once every 3 or 5 days and they take care of themselfs. A total replacement of the dirt / potting mix every 6 -9 months is recommended.

I don’t use bread that is unnecessary.
My local club is my back up . Often in the extreme heat of an Australian summer when one of us goes away for over a month at Xmas we have to restock the person who got lazy or unlucky . At $3 it’s no big deal , I would give you some for free.
 
Upvote 0

Pfrozen

Fill a small tank with indian almond leaves and run a small sponge filter... you now have a copepod culture that will last indefinitely... just add new leaves every now and then but let the old ones rot in there... I recently took mine down but it ran for a few months and was a great source of food for fry... start with a couple handfuls of leaves and wait, they tend to appear after a couple weeks
 
Upvote 0

devsi

I have watched a lot of videos on these worms and many videos make it out to be a lot harder than it is. Seriously just toss in dry cat/dog/fish food that has been in water for a minute or ten once every 3 or 5 days and they take care of themselfs. A total replacement of the dirt / potting mix every 6 -9 months is recommended.

Awesome, thank you! I’ll do some more research and will bare this in mind. Appreciate the offer of free worms, unfortunately I’m in the UK :)

Fill a small tank with indian almond leaves and run a small sponge filter... you now have a copepod culture that will last indefinitely... just add new leaves every now and then but let the old ones rot in there... I recently took mine down but it ran for a few months and was a great source of food for fry... start with a couple handfuls of leaves and wait, they tend to appear after a couple weeks

That sounds really easy, and I’ll definitely look into this. Thanks Pfrozen !

You could try vinegar eels. They literally eat apples, and you can culture them in a jar.
https://www.ibcbettas.org/how-to-culture-and-harvest-vinegar-eels/

Oh nice! Thank you GuppyOverlord11 ! That does sound easy.

Thank you for the link as well :)
 
Upvote 0

Yeoy

I've recently got into grindal worms and they're an amazing live food. As mentioned above, so **** easy and all my fish go nuts for them. If you jump on Youtube there's a video on grindal worms by ''Blake's Aquatics'' that is a no soil method I've been using. Less smell (not that it's normally very bad anyway). Highly recommend.
 
Upvote 0

CrackerboxPalace

Another option is ostracods. Once you have the culture, slap them in a jar with some green water and plants and it's very hard to completely kill the colony.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

I've recently got into grindal worms and they're an amazing live food. As mentioned above, so **** easy and all my fish go nuts for them.
Awesome. Thanks Yeoy !

If you jump on Youtube there's a video on grindal worms by ''Blake's Aquatics'' that is a no soil method I've been using. Less smell (not that it's normally very bad anyway). Highly recommend.

I’ll definitely check that out, thanks! Are there any negatives in using the no soil method?

Another option is ostracods. Once you have the culture, slap them in a jar with some green water and plants and it's very hard to completely kill the colony.

I’ve not even heard of this one, so I’ll definitely give them a look. Thanks CrackerboxPalace !

When you say “green water” I assume you mean water with algae?
 
Upvote 0

Flyfisha

I gave the no soil ( potting mix) method a good try for a month. At least with my dehumidifier running 24/7 in the fish room I found the top layer of pads would dry out. At the same time water just sits in the bottom of the plastic container and does not wick up like dirt does. After a month some grindle worms were alive but they had not spread out over all of the container or multiplied like they do in my dirt ( potting mix) containers. Some worms choose to live on the side of the container instead of in the scrubbing pads.
After 6 -9 months you simply toss the dirt in the garden. I can’t smell anything?
image.jpg
 
Upvote 0

CrackerboxPalace

I’ve not even heard of this one, so I’ll definitely give them a look. Thanks @CrackerboxPalace !

When you say “green water” I assume you mean water with algae?
Pretty much. I cultivate green water (water with a high amount of suspended algae) for my daphnia and ostracods, but you can just do it with any old dechlorinated water, then add fish food and plants etc. Old tank water from a water change would be best :)

I've heard of some people not eve using dechlorinated water but it makes more sense to me to use dechlorinated water.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

I gave the no soil ( potting mix) method a good try for a month. At least with my dehumidifier running 24/7 in the fish room I found the top layer of pads would dry out. At the same time water just sits in the bottom of the plastic container and does not wick up like dirt does. After a month some grindle worms were alive but they had not spread out over all of the container or multiplied like they do in my dirt ( potting mix) containers. Some worms choose to live on the side of the container instead of in the scrubbing pads.

Ah ok. I have some unused soil laying around anyway, so I'll probably give the soil method a go; assuming I can find somewhere to put it :) Thanks!

Does it have to be kept inside, or can it be kept outside?

Pretty much. I cultivate green water (water with a high amount of suspended algae) for my daphnia and ostracods, but you can just do it with any old dechlorinated water, then add fish food and plants etc. Old tank water from a water change would be best

Awesome. So you just get a tub of water change water, stick in some live ostracods and they basically just take care of themselves?
 
Upvote 0

CrackerboxPalace

Ah ok. I have some unused soil laying around anyway, so I'll probably give the soil method a go; assuming I can find somewhere to put it :) Thanks!

Does it have to be kept inside, or can it be kept outside?



Awesome. So you just get a tub of water change water, stick in some live ostracods and they basically just take care of themselves?
Pretty much :) you should stick the jar on a windowsill or next to your tank so it gets some light too. A small water change each week will result in larger populations too.
 
Upvote 1

devsi

you should stick the jar on a windowsill or next to your tank so it gets some light too.

Ah - it has to be kept inside?

Thanks for all the replies :)
 
Upvote 0

CrackerboxPalace

Ah - it has to be kept inside?

Thanks for all the replies :)
Nope, but since you're in the UK and the weather will be getting colder I'd keep them indoors. Colonies start to dwindle under 15 degrees in my experience.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Got it, thanks CrackerboxPalace :) I'll have a look at how to start cultivating grindle worms, as a (hopefully) easy introduction into cultivating live food.
 
Upvote 0

OxymocanthusLongstrinosus

go to a pond, find mud. get the 1st inch of it. stick some in your tank and some in a culture. take floaters you harvest and crush them. stick the crushed plants in the culture to make a decaying bed in your tank. you will get everything from isopods to small shrimps.
 
Upvote 0

ruud

How about Artemia nauplii? Put water with "Artemia salt"in a Hobby dish. Add Artemia eggs (which you can keep for a long time in a fridge). No need for an airstone. Depending on room temperature, wait a day or so. Collect the nauplii with a filter and feed your fish.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Anybody know a good place to buy grindle worms in the UK? None of my local fish shops have them.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Do you trust Ebay ?

For something I want to feed my fish, no, not really :) I did see some on eBay for ~£10, but didn’t think it was a good idea.

Thank you though, Flyfisha
 
Upvote 0

Coradee

If you do Facebook have a look for fishy trading/selling groups near you, they’re usually the best place to find worm cultures etc
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Thanks Coradee , I did post on the only one I could find around my area but I’ll have a look to see again to see if there are others :)
 
Upvote 0

Coradee

Sometimes the word you use in your search can make a difference, try variations of Tropical aquarium fish Club/Association/society etc they’ll often bring up different results hopefully.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Will see what I can find, thank you :) Preston keeps coming up haha.
 
Upvote 0

Coradee

We have the best clubs/shops oop north ;)
 
Upvote 0

devsi

It certainly looks like it :) there’s very little down here
 
Upvote 0

devsi

I currently have a spare 25 Litre tank, with no filter, that I'm not going to use.

Is there a good/easy live food that I can cultivate in it, before I sell it and look into buying other equipment for Grindal worms etc?


Unsure if I can just revive this thread from a week ago, or if I need to create a new post, so let me know if a new post is better....
 
Upvote 0

ruud

Throw in some substrate and a thick layer or leaves. Wait a few weeks and you're ready to suck up copepods with an airtube.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Thanks ruud - when you say "thick layer of leaves", what do you mean exactly?
 
Upvote 0

ruud

Dry leaves of Oak, Beech, Hornbeam, Birch, Mulberry...there are many if you google for suitable leaves for Aquarium. If you collect them beginning of Autumn, when leaves fall off and are not polluted yet by dogs peeing on it, is the perfect time.

You can also use the most common bought leave of the Terminalia catappa tree, which goes by the name of Catappa.

Put aquarium water in your 25 liters tank. A bit of sunlight will help to raise copepods.
 
Upvote 0

devsi

Thanks ruud :)
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
14
Views
161
devsi
Replies
5
Views
106
devsi
Replies
1
Views
71
Cherryshrimp420
Replies
34
Views
986
Joshaeus
Replies
5
Views
130
pagoda

Random Great Thread

New Fish Food Threads

Top Bottom