Is The Led Lighting Enough?

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by McGoo, Apr 18, 2017.

  1. McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Exactly what the heading is..I have 2 finnex 24/7 planted plus led light fixtures over my 125 gallon aquarium. My substrate is 50/50 florite green ands red.. some of my green plants have grown in like a burgundy ish color, and some even a lighter green. Was just wondering if anyone had any thoughts on this?
     
  2. dcutl002

    dcutl002 Well Known Member Member

    Question: which plants are burgundy? I have plants that are reddish (Cryptocoryne Wendtii) and some are bronze (Rotala). So, you are probably fine
     
  3. N

    Nicholas Graham Valued Member Member

    Yes I also have the same light(30" over 29 gallon) it does pretty well with up to medium light plants. I also got some bronze on my crypts and my hygro turned reddish.[​IMG]
     




  4. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    So the plant I was referring to that grew in kind of burgundy was cryptocoryne wendtii... to this isn't a concern? It was a potted plant that came with a label from Florida aquatic nurseries, labeled "green wendtii" on top...
     

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  5. dcutl002

    dcutl002 Well Known Member Member

    Nope. Perfectly normal.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Ok, how about some plants growing in light yellowish green, any thoughts on that?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Ok, how about some plants growing in light yellowish green, any thoughts on that?
     
  8. dcutl002

    dcutl002 Well Known Member Member

    OK...not sure about yellow-green, but---White light consists of every color of the rainbow with Blue and Green being the colors that penetrate water the most. Red is considered one of the most useful for plants; however, in white LEDs, red attenuates the most as it penetrates the water and is one of the reasons why red LEDs are included in fixtures such as Finnex, Beamswork, etc.
     
    Green LEDs make plants pleasing to the eye, but plants also absorb green light particles.
     
  9. s

    smee82 Fishlore VIP Member

    Yellow leaves are a sign of nutrient deficiencie. What fert are you dosing
     
  10. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Another thing maybe I should mention is that I'm getting quite a bit of algea growth on my plants...it's green, not easy to wipe of and is actually kind of soft to the touch under water.... it's a couple millimeters long... for a while I had my temp up to about 86 to rid some clown loaches of ick that they mysteriously got. Anyway, could the high temperatures be a contributer to the growth of algea? I have 5 zebra nerite snails on the way tomorrow, btw, thanks for all your input
     

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  11. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Call me a noobie, but I'm not using any firts, straight flourite substrate.. that's not enough then?
     
  12. Dolfan

    Dolfan Fishlore VIP Member

    Actually I think the light spectrum works a bit differently with plants. Plants are green because they reflect mostly green light, hence why they appear green to us. They utilize much more of the red and blue spectrums and very little of the green (since it's mostly reflected). Finnex and other companies include the RED LED's as the plants need color in that spectrum, as they do some in blue as well.

    As for light penetration, actually blue light penetrates water the best, hence why the ocean appears blue to us underwater. Much of the red and green spectrums are filtered out, hence why you see salt water lights for coral being in the far blue range of 10,000k or higher. Here's a link that explains it better than me....

     

    As for OP's question, I think 2 of those planted plus should be plenty for a good medium light tank.

    Here's a link to an article I put together on dealing with algae,

    Algae problems and how to deal with them

    As for ferts, I would suggest root tabs just to be on the safe side, and you probably need some form of liquid or dry ferts for the water column. Here's a link to an article I put together about getting started with planted tanks, it has a lot of good info and links...

    How To Set Up a Low Light Low Tech Planted Tank

    While it is more for low light tanks, a lot of the same rules apply to your low-mediumish tank.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
  13. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

    Thanks for the help and great info everyone, can't wait to get these issues under control! Much appreciated!:emoji_ok_hand::emoji_thumbsup:
     
  14. dcutl002

    dcutl002 Well Known Member Member

    Yeah @Dolfan, I was thinking yellow-green light and now that I re-read the OPs post I think he is referring to yellow-green leaves. I apologize @McGoo.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    McGoo

    McGoo Valued Member Member

     




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