Is it cruel to keep fish in opaque tank?

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thefishnoob

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Hi, question says all. IMO It doesnt. Do they really need to see everything outside the tank?

What about ponds? Itsnt that the same pretty much?

The reason I ask is I plan to get some guppies or something to put in my duckweed bin. Saw some nice looking guppies in the LFS today with some sort of floater. Might get that too. But I might win April's contest, so I'm going to see, if I do, I will probably put them in there.

Last thing: Would it be mean/detrimental to my existing guppy to put him into the duckweed "farm"? I want to put him into the 5 gallon sterilite duckweed bin. Of course he would have some friends, decor, and other stuff. What do you guys think?
 

April R

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should be fine. I think glass tanks are probably more "cruel" LOL
 
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thefishnoob

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why do you think so? Im curious.

Okay then
 

Teleost

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There's not many glass tanks used in aquaculture. They're all opaque fibreglass or plastic.

I have to agree with April. It's probably kinder to keep them in an opaque tank.
 

MikeChicago

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In my humble opinion the shape and even to some degree the color of the tank isn't really important. What's important is having the size of the tank, water parameters, and proper lighting and decor for the fish you want to keep.
 
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thefishnoob

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Wait, I still dont get why glass ones are worse?
 

Sayba

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Glass tanks I'd imagine would be worse because they can get scared of people walking past, movement can scare fish. Obviously they get used to it being kept in glass tanks all their lives.
 

jileha

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The only potential issue with opaque tanks is that you cannot observe the fish that well and spot early signs of disease as you'd be looking down on them. This would be my main argument against opaque tanks - particularly with small fish - and that's why I use a glass tank instead of some plastic container as QT.

Right now I'm treating a recently received CPD for what might be columnaris. I would never have spotted the first symptoms on such a small and lively fish in anything but a glass (or acrylic) tank (plus a magnifying glass ).

Fish generally also look their best when looked at from the side. So you'd miss out as well on a lot of their behavior and beauty. Unless I would be interested in mass breeding without consideration to cultivate particular traits, I therefore wouldn't use opaque containers. Why keep fish if you cannot enjoy them properly?

Kois in ponds are large enough to display their colors and beauty even when looked at from the top. Guppies are so small...

Glass tanks are meant mostly for our enjoyment. However, some fish do enjoy to interact with us to some extent. And they love being able to see you come with food in your hand!
 
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thefishnoob

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When I feed my 9 fish in my 10 gallon, they look so beautiful from up top. Its like a mini pond. I have grown to actually kind of like that.

Perhaps I will cut a square on the side of the tub and silicone a piece of glass. Would that serve?

Oh, BTW. Its on the floor. So I dont really look alot. But yeah,
 

pugletfan

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I remember in a previous thread you asked about adding a few fish to your bin of duckweed to help fertilize it, and someone suggested that you add your used fishtank water from water changes (from your other aquariums) to your duckweed bin, and let your fish live in your existing aquariums . I agree with that suggestion.
 

_Fried_Bettas_

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I know that some betta breeders black out their spawning tanks so the bettas don't get distracted. I don't think normally though that a betta would be happy in a bucket or something where they didn't have some visual stimulation. I know that bettas left in empty rooms tend to seem more depressed. But I don't think this matters to most fish such as guppies.
 
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thefishnoob

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Yeah. The tub is actually not very opaque. You can see some, but its a bit unclear. I dont want to always constantly add used water from tanks. Its just a bit too much hassle. I also want some more movement

Okay, thanks everyone!
 
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