Is High Ph Bad?

CloudTheFluffy

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So I don’t own a liquid test kit myself and after cycling, I only go to an lfs to check my water and give me numbers useing a liquid kit once every 2-3 months or if there a problem. Then on a daily basis I was going to start to use strips because of the deaths of 4 Cory cats incase of a spike I was missing.

The nirtrate, nitrite and ammonia have all been pretty much accurate and I was under the impression that test strips were not completely in accurate.
But apparently my ph is 8.4 or above. Is that okay for my fish? I’ve never asked the lfs to test ph and won’t be going there for awhile now.
Stock:
3x angelfish
2x yo-yo loach
3x khuli loach
6x bloodfin tetra
5x white skirt tetra
3x bronze cory cats
I’m going to be getting more cory cats and khulis next lfs vist.
 

Hunter1

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Size of tank?

I wouldn’t own fish without a liquid test kit.

For the cost of 4 dead corys you can buy the API MASTER TEST KIT.

Edit: I see it’s a 65.
 

JoeFish26

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Well a test kit is very much worth the price! But a stable and consistent ph is your goal i keep many "acidic" water fish in more alkalyn water (discus,rams,apistos, ect..) my ph reads 8.2 out of my tap and thats how i leave it and have much success doing so never chase ph just keep it consistent and your fish will be perfect and healthy!! Hope that helps
 
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CloudTheFluffy

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The Cory’s were fed hikari sinking pellets, blood worms 1-2 a week, any leftover flakes or pellets. It’s 65g these results from Wednesday were nitrate 20ppm, nitrite 0, ammonia 0.
I’m saving for a master kit but I need to buy it in stores unless I wait at least a month and a half, tops could be 3 months and the mark up from amazons 21$ is 30$ Making it 50$

I have a thread on the dead Cory cats and no one could find a reason why they were dead, I’m thinking there was some kind of unseen infection or problem.
 

Lunnietic

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CloudTheFluffy said:
The Cory’s were fed hikari sinking pellets, blood worms 1-2 a week, any leftover flakes or pellets. It’s 65g these results from Wednesday were nitrate 20ppm, nitrite 0, ammonia 0.
I’m saving for a master kit but I need to buy it in stores unless I wait at least a month and a half, tops could be 3 months and the mark up from amazons 21$ is 30$ Making it 50$

I have a thread on the dead Cory cats and no one could find a reason why they were dead, I’m thinking there was some kind of unseen infection or problem.
Sorry if this sounds dumb. But you were only feeding them 1-2 pellets a week? Is this per cory or just 1-2 total?
 
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CloudTheFluffy

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No I meant I was feeding blood worms twice a week I could have spaced that better I can’t type on my phone. For the 6 in there and five loaches around 6 pellets per day. Sometimes 8 because my angelfish loved them too and stole them. And they got a lot of my angelfish pellets because they were crushed and sank fast.
 

JoeFish26

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CloudTheFluffy said:
The Cory’s were fed hikari sinking pellets, blood worms 1-2 a week, any leftover flakes or pellets. It’s 65g these results from Wednesday were nitrate 20ppm, nitrite 0, ammonia 0.
I’m saving for a master kit but I need to buy it in stores unless I wait at least a month and a half, tops could be 3 months and the mark up from amazons 21$ is 30$ Making it 50$

I have a thread on the dead Cory cats and no one could find a reason why they were dead, I’m thinking there was some kind of unseen infection or problem.
Corys are more sensitive to shock so when adding new ones it's important to acclimate them right and don't rush then into the water but just wait for a sale and invest in a kit its worth having! But you seem to be doing everything else right.
 
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CloudTheFluffy

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I don’t think it was shock because they died around 3 weeks to a month later. But I will try and acclimate new ones with the drip method next time. I had them in a bucket and put a cup of tank water in every 5 minutes for about an hour last time.
 

SFGiantsGuy

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I dunno, with the fact of most fish readily and stradily adapting to certain oh's not withstanding, Corys usually do prefer more softer water not over 7.8...

Augh. Sorry, but my PS4's keyboard sucks. Plenty 'o typos...! Sorry, sorry......
 

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I don't know about the others, but the ph is pretty high for what angels prefer. Most tetras prefer more acidic water too.

If you have already thrown money in the trash for test strips, you really ought to suck it up and spend the $20 on a real test kit. When it comes down to it, strips are useless enough that you're literally putting dollars in the garbage, and when you work it out like price per test, they are far more expensive than a liquid kit. It's really quite difficult to keep fish healthy long term without it.

There is a lot of talk about Cory species having trouble acclimating to high ph. Some do well, others don't. With ph that high, acclimating in a bucket with a few random cups of tank water is not ideal - drip acclimating would be much safer. Bronze cories are said to be easier to keep in high ph, but then high ph means any spike in ammonia, nitrite or nitrate is way more toxic. Since you don't test the water I imagine you probably lost your cories to a spike you didn't know about which was amplified by the ph.

I noticed you're running one of those cheapo nicrew lights - how do you like it? Do you have live plants? My super powerful reef light that I used on my 5.5g tank just died and apparently it's so old that Coralife no longer makes the bulbs for it, so I'm shopping for a new one. I was just looking at the nicrew lights on amazon, they're super cheap and it seems like most reviewers are satisfied. What do you think?
 

tjander

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In my experience there is very little difference in strips and api both have there flaws in the fact that it is almost impossible to tell the difference in colors on the chart.
Now that said cost per test makes the api kit the winner. Far cheaper then the strips. No more accurate in my experience and are sure easier to use.
As far as ph stability is the most important factor keep your ph stable and that should be good the poster who said he uses what comes out of the the tap is the right answer IMO.
 
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CloudTheFluffy

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MissRuthless said:
I don't know about the others, but the ph is pretty high for what angels prefer. Most tetras prefer more acidic water too.

If you have already thrown money in the trash for test strips, you really ought to suck it up and spend the $20 on a real test kit. When it comes down to it, strips are useless enough that you're literally putting dollars in the garbage, and when you work it out like price per test, they are far more expensive than a liquid kit. It's really quite difficult to keep fish healthy long term without it.

There is a lot of talk about Cory species having trouble acclimating to high ph. Some do well, others don't. With ph that high, acclimating in a bucket with a few random cups of tank water is not ideal - drip acclimating would be much safer. Bronze cories are said to be easier to keep in high ph, but then high ph means any spike in ammonia, nitrite or nitrate is way more toxic. Since you don't test the water I imagine you probably lost your cories to a spike you didn't know about which was amplified by the ph.

I noticed you're running one of those cheapo nicrew lights - how do you like it? Do you have live plants? My super powerful reef light that I used on my 5.5g tank just died and apparently it's so old that Coralife no longer makes the bulbs for it, so I'm shopping for a new one. I was just looking at the nicrew lights on amazon, they're super cheap and it seems like most reviewers are satisfied. What do you think?
I only have low light plants, java moss and anubias nana and they are both growing fine. I have had the plants for maybe three - four weeks and they have been growing at a steady pace after settling, new growth on everything.
There okay, but the quality of the plastic is cheap and you can't have it over an open tank as it's not water proof at all.
I have heard that they can work for medium lighting plants but I have not tested that yet.
Keeping in mind that I do have sunlight hitting the tank at certain times that could be affecting the growth.
 
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