Is having high GH bad?

Blueberrybetta

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I just got the gh/kh liquid test kit for the first time today, and my GH came out to 12 drops and according to the chart, it means 140-200ppm, would that be correct? My KH came out to 5 drops or 50-100ppm. Also have IAL, roobios tea and alder cones.

I have a 10gal with a single betta & 2 mystery snails. Is my GH too high for my betta? I know they prefer soft water so i'm wanting to double check. I also recently added a small piece of cuttlebone for my mystery snails , assuming that is why my GH is so high..

How can I lower my GH besides wc. Should I be concerned and try to lower it? Any thoughts and opinions welcome. Thanks
 

Tankmandan

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Water changes wont always change your tank GH unless you are running co2, test your tap water as it probably has the same GH. 140-200ppm is not that bad. High GH readings are more in the 400ppm and higher range. Rocks, some substrates, crushed coral and things can raise your GH so if you have some of those in your tank that can add to your GH reading.
 

-Mak-

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Not a major issue. I believe I read a paper a while back that said soft water fish in hard water get calcium build ups in their kidneys, but hobbyists who keep soft water fish in hard water don't really get immediate problems from it.

If your tap also has the same GH, the only way to lower it is RO water.
I think there are some water softeners that remove GH but they replace the GH with some different ions? Someone might know something about that

Tankmandan said:
Water changes wont always change your tank GH unless you are running co2, test your tap water as it probably has the same GH. 140-200ppm is not that bad. High GH readings are more in the 400ppm and higher range. Rocks, some substrates, crushed coral and things can raise your GH so if you have some of those in your tank that can add to your GH reading.
CO2 doesn't affect GH! :)
 

Chanyi

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Soft water vs hard water is in terms of KH not GH. GH is the sum of Ca and Mg in the water, and KH is the carbonate hardness of the water, which determines pH and thus is more relative to "hard" vs "soft".
 
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Blueberrybetta

Blueberrybetta

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-Mak- said:
Not a major issue. I believe I read a paper a while back that said soft water fish in hard water get calcium build ups in their kidneys, but hobbyists who keep soft water fish in hard water don't really get immediate problems from it.

If your tap also has the same GH, the only way to lower it is RO water.
I think there are some water softeners that remove GH but they replace the GH with some different ions? Someone might know something about that


CO2 doesn't affect GH! :)
Hello, i just tested my tap waters GH/KH.

•Tap water
-GH: 8° (100- 200ppm)
-KH: 4° (0- 50ppm)

•10gal tank
GH: 12° (140- 200ppm)
-KH: 5° (50- 100ppm)

Since my tap waters GH is lower, a water change wouldnt lower it? If I dont need to lower it my GH, then I wont bother. I have mystery snails and Ive been told to add cuttlebone many of times, so when I finally did and it fully dissolved, it shot my GH up between 140-200ppm.

Im new to GH/KH rather than the usual parameters, so would the GH im at now be safe for my betta? Is my GH even high enough for mystery snails? What would you reccomend on having my GH at? Should I keep adding cuttlebone every now and then, or would 100ppm GH be good enough for my snails shells and 1 betta? Thanks for any tips.
 

BlackOsprey

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Bettas generally don't care about hardness levels, as long as you avoid extremes. You won't be getting extremes with tap water + cuttlebone alone. You'd either have to use unmineralized RO, or go crazy with water hardening minerals, or collect runoff water from a drainage ditch. Your hardness levels as they are now won't affect your fish much.

I keep most of my tanks anywhere between 5-15 GH. Most of my planted tanks are around 5, but that's mostly because plants prefer softer water. Unless you're keeping ultra-sensitive shrimp or rift lake ciclids, your tap water hardness plus calcium supplements should be fine.
 

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