Is driftwood safe?

Tpane27

I have a 29 gallon and added a bristlenose pleco. I read drift wood is commonly used with them as sources of fiber and potential hiding places. Will driftwood affect a community aquarium? Ph? Thank you!
 

LeviS

It will not significantly effect the ph. Driftwood is a common decor for aquariums. Some woods leach tannins into the water and can be beneficial to fish. Some plecos feed on the driftwood pending their type. Ive never noticed a significant change in ph in any of my aquariums when using driftwood.
 
Upvote 0

FishGirl38

So, Yes it's safe, but yes it can also affect PH slightly. Natural woods will release tannins into the water, tannins are technically acidic, so it CAN lower the PH slightly - however, it shouldn't affect the PH too much if 1.) you don't add way too much (one piece shouldn't change much) and 2.) you keep up on tap water changes.

If you're doing regular water changes, than essentially, you'd also be replenishing minerals and your PH should remain consistent, even with the addition of driftwood.

I've got 3 large pieces of spider wood in my 135G and the ph is consistent at 7.6. Agree with above. I've never had a problem with low PH due to driftwood.

As a note, the darker driftwoods (like mopani wood or malaysian driftwood) will leech more tannins than the lighter woods (like spiderwood), and those tannins will turn the tank a slight yellowy, orangey, browney color. this will go away with time (and the carbon will help some), and it doesn't negatively affect your fish (it's actually good for them, as mentioned). You can help curb this affect by first soaking the wood in a bucket for a few days (or hours, depending on how clear you want your tank water to be soon after adding the wood).
 
Upvote 0

Tpane27

It will not significantly effect the ph. Driftwood is a common decor for aquariums. Some woods leach tannins into the water and can be beneficial to fish. Some plecos feed on the driftwood pending their type. Ive never noticed a significant change in ph in any of my aquariums when using driftwood.
Do you recommend any type of drift wood? Im not looking for something 12 inches tall per say but something smaller in the 4-6 inch range just to add to the bottom
 
Upvote 0

Tpane27

So, Yes it's safe, but yes it can also affect PH slightly. Natural woods will release tannins into the water, tannins are technically acidic, so it CAN lower the PH slightly - however, it shouldn't affect the PH too much if 1.) you don't add way too much (one piece shouldn't change much) and 2.) you keep up on tap water changes.

If you're doing regular water changes, than essentially, you'd also be replenishing minerals and your PH should remain consistent, even with the addition of driftwood.

I've got 3 large pieces of spider wood in my 135G and the ph is consistent at 7.6. Agree with above. I've never had a problem with low PH due to driftwood.

As a note, the darker driftwoods (like mopani wood or malaysian driftwood) will leech more tannins than the lighter woods (like spiderwood), and those tannins will turn the tank a slight yellowy, orangey, browney color. this will go away with time (and the carbon will help some), and it doesn't negatively affect your fish (it's actually good for them, as mentioned). You can help curb this affect by first soaking the wood in a bucket for a few days (or hours, depending on how clear you want your tank water to be soon after adding the wood).
I would only like to add something to the bottom of the tank so not too tall. I do actually have a plastic decor drift wood thing thats about 10 inches tall. I could/should remove that and add real drift wood.
 
Upvote 0

FishGirl38

I would only like to add something to the bottom of the tank so not too tall. I do actually have a plastic decor drift wood thing thats about 10 inches tall. I could/should remove that and add real drift wood.

Totally up to you if you want to remove that piece and replace it, or you could just add some wood in with the ceramic piece. I personally like mopani wood for my plecos - but I don't have immediate access to malaysian driftwood, and I've heard that's also favorable. I'd say it's totally up to you.

Spider wood is usually taller, but you can also find some smaller pieces, if you're looking for something that will mimic how a 'tree' looks, spider wood is the way to go (but pleco would probably appreciate the mopani/malaysian - i find it's usually larger and offers more potential hiding areas than the spider wood does (you can make flat caves out of mopani wood, whereas spider wood just has too many little pieces on it for it to make a good 'cave').

If you're just looking for something like a thicker stump, I'd consider the other two types, mopani and malaysian. There are other types out there too, those are just what I'm most familiar with. Usually you can find some good, thicker, smaller pieces of mopani wood where I work (what I'm familiar with). and we get ours through fluval (or hagen, however you want to look at it). Though, if you were to order it online or something, I will say the piece you receive will probably not look like the piece you see in the online order picture. I only mention that because we sell ours in bulk, BUT the fluval woods do have bar-codes that're used for individual pricing other places so...depends where/how you're shopping for it.
 
Upvote 0

Tpane27

Totally up to you if you want to remove that piece and replace it, or you could just add some wood in with the ceramic piece. I personally like mopani wood for my plecos - but I don't have immediate access to malaysian driftwood, and I've heard that's also favorable. I'd say it's totally up to you.

Spider wood is usually taller, but you can also find some smaller pieces, if you're looking for something that will mimic how a 'tree' looks, spider wood is the way to go (but pleco would probably appreciate the mopani/malaysian - i find it's usually larger and offers more potential hiding areas than the spider wood does (you can make flat caves out of mopani wood, whereas spider wood just has too many little pieces on it for it to make a good 'cave').

If you're just looking for something like a thicker stump, I'd consider the other two types, mopani and malaysian. There are other types out there too, those are just what I'm most familiar with. Usually you can find some good, thicker, smaller pieces of mopani wood where I work (what I'm familiar with). and we get ours through fluval (or hagen, however you want to look at it). Though, if you were to order it online or something, I will say the piece you receive will probably not look like the piece you see in the online order picture, we sell ours in bulk
Thank you so much! I actually pulled the trigger right before I read this after reading about Fluval Mopani driftwood. Almost everything I own from filter to heater is Fluval and some med products from Seachem I have as emergency like paraguard and prime. Paraguard saved my tank a few months back after a newly added fish brought ich with it. Every fish in my tank had it minus the corys and african dwarf frogs. The only fish that didnt make it was the one who brought the ich. Im assuming the newest fish had it because the tank was perfectly fine until the new fish arrived. Plus the fish was the first one to be covered like crazy. Paraguard saved everything and didnt harm my corys or frogs incase anyone was interested!
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
1
Views
197
BigManAquatics
Replies
9
Views
213
applejax
  • Question
Replies
11
Views
371
Meg123P
Replies
1
Views
365
Marijn Lange
Replies
11
Views
415
StarGirl

Random Great Thread!

New Driftwood Threads

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom