Is A Strong Filter Bad For A Small Planted Tank? (15 Gallon)

Rack

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I've read on an article the following:

"Live plant tanks. Decreasing surface agitation helps hold in the much needed by plants. Most plants cannot tolerate being in the middle of the flow stream.

Small fish, baby fish, and betta tanks need a very slow flow rate. It can cause much unwanted stress for them to swim in the current all the time."

I'm planning on having a planted 15 gallons with small chili rasboras or probably endlers, or any kind of nano fishes. With shrimps. I have a 1500 l/h filter, but it seems the current is too strong , there is no plants yet and no fishes since I'm cycling it first.
Should I stick with the 1500 l/h internal filter or exchange it with a 800 l/h or a 1200 l/h ?
 
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Florian Pellet

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Having a bigger filter is usually a good thing. You can try and baffle the outflow with a sponge.
As for the plants, unless you plan on injecting CO2, they'll be fine. They might actually help reducing the flow.
 

Tiny_Tanganyikans

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You can have 3000gph flowing in that tiny aquarium but if you position the outflow correctly you'll have minimal co2 loss.

I have a rack of planted aquariums ranging from 60gallons to 20 gallons 5 aquariums on this rack. Theyre all on the same sump and overflow into each other. Theyre powered by a 2300gph pump that runs on full blast and the sump has a wet/dry tower. It only takes about 6bps to keep a steady 30ppm co2
 

Swampgorilla

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I dunno man, I think I would go for the 800 liter. I have dealt with excessive water outlet problems in the past and, yes - they can be solved in most cases but the solutions are sometimes not that elegant or good looking and sometimes look a lot like "Cajun Engineering"! LOL
 
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Rack

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You can have 3000gph flowing in that tiny aquarium but if you position the outflow correctly you'll have minimal co2 loss.

I have a rack of planted aquariums ranging from 60gallons to 20 gallons 5 aquariums on this rack. Theyre all on the same sump and overflow into each other. Theyre powered by a 2300gph pump that runs on full blast and the sump has a wet/dry tower. It only takes about 6bps to keep a steady 30ppm co2
How do i position it correctly? Lay it horizontal on the bottom?
 
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Rack

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With a DIY yeast and sugar system. Also are these water movement filters necessary?
 

Tiny_Tanganyikans

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With a DIY yeast and sugar system. Also are these water movement filters necessary?
Meh a DIY system is a waste of effort. Unless you're truely broke you can get a great regulator for 40 $ and a small 20oz tank will last for a few months on an aquarium your size.

If you're gonna go the diy option the co2 tablets and liquid carbon are way better options. A DIY system is useless and unreliable, and a hastle. Unless you spend money on one of those regulators for soda bottles you'll most likely end up with a algae problem or worst case dead fish.
 
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Rack

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It's just a 15 gallon, many DIY system returned positive reviews with this, they usually have small tanks. Anyway, how much does 20oz would cost me? And yeah I can get one of those Co2 tablets, are they good?
 

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What I always say to people is to travel down to half a dozen local streams and lakes. Stand in the water, and check for movement. or put a hand in, and feel the flow.
Then go home and do the same with your filter.
The filter won't even be close (unless you went to a swamp).

It doesn't solve technical issues like CO2, but it does give a perspective on fish and moving water.

It's also worthwhile to look at plants, species by species. There are a number that need a strong water flow to flourish.
 

Tiny_Tanganyikans

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This was setup for my nano in the kitchen before I ran dedicated lines through the wall.

It's very reliable and would last about 3 months on a ~24g aquarium at 1.5bps. All together it cost me 56 $ (via amazon) and 4 $ for the refill.
20170130_183357.jpg
 
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Rack

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What I always say to people is to travel down to half a dozen local streams and lakes. Stand in the water, and check for movement. or put a hand in, and feel the flow.
Then go home and do the same with your filter.
The filter won't even be close (unless you went to a swamp).

It doesn't solve technical issues like CO2, but it does give a perspective on fish and moving water.

It's also worthwhile to look at plants, species by species. There are a number that need a strong water flow to flourish.
I want dwarf pearl/tears and some Cryptocoryne, and some java moss. Basically anything good for my shrimp.

This was setup for my nano in the kitchen before I ran dedicated lines through the wall.

It's very reliable and would last about 3 months on a ~24g aquarium at 1.5bps. All together it cost me 56 $ (via amazon) and 4 $ for the refill.
View attachment 326553
Looks good, but a bit too big, I'd have to by me a stand with a locker to hide it. Would co2 tablets do the trick for the moment till I save some money for the regulator? I will start with dwarf pearls/tears and some Cryptocoryne.
 
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Tiny_Tanganyikans

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If you pick a different carpet you don't even need co2.

For carpets that don't require co2 for lush growth I prefer japan, clover (dwarf moreso), s. Repens, and dwarf sag. The last two will grow a lot slower so you would need more for an initial planting. You could even do dwarf hairgrass, two mats would be enough to cover your aquarium in no time with simple root tabs.
The first two grow like weeds, with a balanced dosing of fertz they would have to be pruned weekly as to not swallow your aquarium
Looks good, but a bit too big, I'd have to by me a stand with a locker to hide it. Would co2 tablets do the trick for the moment till I save some money for the regulator? I will start with dwarf pearls/tears and some Cryptocoryne.
What I did was mount it underneath tthe aquarium stand with two clasps horizontally.

And yes the tablets do work pretty well, I would suggest excell or co2 booster also or instead of.
 

NavigatorBlack

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I'm a big Cryptocoryne guy. I have tanks completely carpeted from the 3 plants I started with years ago. It flourishes here, and spreads.
I have never used CO2 though.
 

Tiny_Tanganyikans

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Crypts will grow in a toilet with nuclear mcdonald bombs. Same for java moss. Pick a different carpet and you don't need to worry. Dwarf baby tears really need stable co2 injection, very intense lighting, and pretty cool water. If any of its off it'll melt and you'll just end up with faux duckweed.
 

Florian Pellet

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Tiny_Tanganyikans

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What plant are you talking about here? Hydrocotyle sp. 'japan'?
Yes, and four leaf clover. Neither need co2 nor even very intense lighting. Root tabs are enough to make them grow like weeds and if you don't have great lightning you can literally smash it with the palm of your hand to make it grow compact and low (like mechanical retardation of a bonsai tree)


Also I've never had any issue using excell or co2 booster with shrimp. I have several types of inverts. I think problems arise when people overdose because they estimate by using cap threads. If you're going to use liquid additives of any kind investing in a 1 $ syringe is the smartest thing you could do. I dosed both excell and co2 booster for a very long time daily and my shrimp population continued to grow and thrive.
 
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Tiny_Tanganyikans

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Marsilea Quadrifolia?
And yeah they grow like crazy! I used to have Hemiantus 'cuba' grow like crazy in my high tech, so imagine when I put some Marsilea Hirsuta!
Yes. I prefer the dwarf variety (hirsuta) but I have both. Dwarf clover is more appealing shade of green that contrasts well against black sand and it grows very fast. You can almost literally watch the runners grow and I find propagating it is a little easier. You can cut a clump and literally bury it in the substrate and it will grow fine. Quadrifolia is more fickle and you need a larger clump and it can't be completely buried. So without some plant anchors it can be a pain to spread around manually especially with aggressive foraging fish like dojo loaches that like to tear everything up
 
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Rack

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Crypts will grow in a toilet with nuclear mcdonald bombs. Same for java moss. Pick a different carpet and you don't need to worry. Dwarf baby tears really need stable co2 injection, very intense lighting, and pretty cool water. If any of its off it'll melt and you'll just end up with faux duckweed.
Hydrocotyle sp. 'japan doesn't look quite appealing thought, I don't like how tall they get. Do you know anything that looks more like dwarf tears?
 
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