Is A 4 Inch Thick Concrete Block Wall Enough To Support Our Raised Pond?

Annandgoldfish

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The pond is a rectangular pond about 4 feet wide, 14 feet long, and about 2 feet deep (8 inches has been dug and 16 inches will be supported by the wall). Blocks are 16x8x4. Here’s a picture: (there will be another layer of blocks stacked above the ones in the picture)
IMG_3679.JPG
 

2211Nighthawk

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I would not trust that unless they are seriously cemented in place. That amount of water I would fully expect to blow those walls apart otherwise. There is a reason they are usually stuck in the ground. Think of above ground vs in ground pools. In ground are WAY bigger becuase the ground itself keeps the walls from blowing out. 10g of water is enough to bow out the tub I’m using and I have a strap around it for just that reason.
 
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Annandgoldfish

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2211Nighthawk said:
I would not trust that unless they are seriously cemented in place. That amount of water I would fully expect to blow those walls apart otherwise. There is a reason they are usually stuck in the ground. Think of above ground vs in ground pools. In ground are WAY bigger becuase the ground itself keeps the walls from blowing out. 10g of water is enough to bow out the tub I’m using and I have a strap around it for just that reason.
Hmm.. guess we will flip the blocks sideways and make the walls 8 inches thick. Thanks for the quick response!
 

2211Nighthawk

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Annandgoldfish said:
Hmm.. guess we will flip the blocks sideways and make the walls 8 inches thick. Thanks for the quick response!
Honestly, I’d have it complete in the ground if possible. It will help insulate the pond and it’s far more sturdy. Water had a huge amount of weight and I just would not risk it. If they were reinforced on the outside, either boxing it in with 2x6’s or cement, then yes. But there is nothing to keep the bricks from sliding and causing a disaster. Even if you had interlocking bricks those would be better then what you have.
 

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I'm no handyman, but I have to agree with 2211Nighthawk. It appears precarious. I guess a lot of that has to do with the fact that I have no idea what you're planning to do. I'm assuming you are just planning on putting the liner over the bricks and holding it in place somehow. I just don't know without any other context. Have you done any research into pond building at least?
 
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Annandgoldfish

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2211Nighthawk said:
Honestly, I’d have it complete in the ground if possible. It will help insulate the pond and it’s far more sturdy. Water had a huge amount of weight and I just would not risk it. If they were reinforced on the outside, either boxing it in with 2x6’s or cement, then yes. But there is nothing to keep the bricks from sliding and causing a disaster. Even if you had interlocking bricks those would be better then what you have.
Actually we are planning to cover what we’ve dug in cement as well. We live in the south, so is insulation even something we should worry about? Also, I’ve heard that cement is safe for fish. Does that eliminate the need for a liner?

scarface said:
I'm no handyman, but I have to agree with 2211Nighthawk. It appears precarious. I guess a lot of that has to do with the fact that I have no idea what you're planning to do. I'm assuming you are just planning on putting the liner over the bricks and holding it in place somehow. I just don't know without any other context. Have you done any research into pond building at least?
Of course. The blocks may look precarious because they’re just laid in the ground not secured by anything. We’re kind of just outlining it for now and seeing how it looks.
 

scarface

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Annandgoldfish said:
Of course. The blocks may look precarious because they’re just laid in the ground not secured by anything. We’re kind of just outlining it for now and seeing how it looks.
Context is everything. I literally had no idea what you were trying to do exactly. Please be more clear. Thanks.
 
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Annandgoldfish

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scarface said:
Context is everything. I literally had no idea what you were trying to do exactly. Please be more clear. Thanks.
Bricks and the part that has been dug will be covered and secured with cement like I said in one of my replies. We’re not doing anything for now though so plans may change if we get some good suggestions.
 

2211Nighthawk

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Insulating it will also help keep it from getting too hot. I don’t know what kind of temperature swing you have to deal with. I’m not an expert either so you might want someone else to take a look at the final design. As for no liner, I’m not sure.
 
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Annandgoldfish

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2211Nighthawk said:
Insulating it will also help keep it from getting too hot. I don’t know what kind of temperature swing you have to deal with. I’m not an expert either so you might want someone else to take a look at the final design. As for no liner, I’m not sure.
Ok. thanks for the advice!
 

maggie thecat

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I have an above ground pond made of cinderblocks and pond liner. It works fine. At somepoint, we are going to cover it with faux stone for appearances sake. The blocks are cemented together, but it is worth noting that home supply stores do seasonal ponds of stacked block with no worries.
 

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