Is 8.2 too high for bettas?

A201

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The water in my area has a PH of 8.2. Plenty of Betta keepers w/ healthy fish around here. Likely no problems.
 

JJ3204

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I think the closer to neutral the better, but mine is at 8.2 as well and he is fine. As long as the pH is steady, your betta will be perfectly fine.
 

RomeoOscar

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Dotfish said:
So is it too high?
Way too high. He will live for a long while in that water and will probably be fine, but won't live as long and will definitely not be as healthy. I keep my ph closer to 7 by using Indian almond leaves. It drops ph, adds medicinal properties to the water and helps with overall health of the Fish
 

barracooter

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To add to RomeoOscar's response, you could also use driftwood to lower pH. Or just simply start doing water changes with less alkaline water and slowly work the pH down.

Romeo is right that a betta would prefer more neutral water, but at the end of the day, a betta would definitely live a good life at 8.2. My best LFS keeps them at 7.6, and they always looks phenomenal.

P.S. if you have plants, they are probably the reason for 0 nitrates. Nitrate is an available source of nitrogen for plants, so they will happily soak it up. In fact, I have to add nitrate to my tanks to keep the plants happy, because the fish excrement isn't enough for them to keep growing healthily.
 

JJ3204

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I’m planning on buying Seachem Neutral Regulator to slowly lower my pH, maybe you could try it. There are a lot of products to do this.
 

AquaticQueen

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Dotfish said:
So is it too high?
No. 8.2 is fine for bettas. I keep my betta in a pH of 8.2 and so do many other members.
If you really want to soften the water, add driftwood or rainwater. Just make sure there is no ammonia in the rainwater before adding it to the aquarium.
RomeoOscar said:
Way too high. He will live for a long while in that water and will probably be fine, but won't live as long and will definitely not be as healthy. I keep my ph closer to 7 by using Indian almond leaves. It drops ph, adds medicinal properties to the water and helps with overall health of the Fish
I have heard of fishkeepers who had their bettas in a pH around 7 and they didn't live more then 2-3 years. The water chemistry was always good too.
 

Doom

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So basically, people that have a betta in an 8.2 will tell you it's ok. But the recommendation is between 6.5 to 8 and the crown tails prefer acidic(below 7). The pH recommendation can differ from betta species but the pH is not all, the minerals are also a must.
 

CosmicFish

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So Bettas in the wild live in a more neutral pH of 7, hence why people say get it to neutral. Bettas are also pretty hardy and adaptable so they can adapt to other water parameters. It you want to lower your pH, I would do it naturally with driftwood or certain things like the Indian Almond leaves as others above have suggested.

From what I read, what becomes an issue is if the pH is fluctuating. That can stress on the Betta. So if you’re trying to lower the pH but still need to do weekly water changes that will cause the pH to bump back up, that fluctuation will give you more problems then if you just leave the pH at 8.2.
 

JJ3204

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I read somewhere that in the wild there are a lot of leaves that fall into the water sources that some bettas live in, making it probably a 5 in acidity because of all the tannins. So I guess whatever they are used to is what it should stay at.
 
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Dotfish

Dotfish

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Thank you, everyone! I heard a lot about it being okay... so I grabbed...

A BETTA!!!
He is a very pretty boy (red koi). I'll try to get some pictures!

I do have a couple plants in my tank, but they seem to be dieing.
20200805_143518.jpg
 

JJ3204

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If they are new plants, then the leaves are probably melting from changes due to new environmental parameters. Soon you should have new growth for the new environment. Or they could just simply be dieing from lack of nutrients I guess, I’m not the biggest plant expert.
 
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Dotfish

Dotfish

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JJ3204 said:
If they are new plants, then the leaves are probably melting from changes due to new environmental parameters. Soon you should have new growth for the new environment. Or they could just simply be dieing from lack of nutrients I guess, I’m not the biggest plant expert.
The plants aren't new, but are still dieing...
20200805_144238.jpg

(The pretty boy again :))
 

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