Iridescent Shark Growout

trash.binh91

Member
I want to think about breeding iridescent sharks when I get older. What tank would be appropriate for growing out young.
 

AquaticJ

Member
Multiple iridescent Sharks are gunna need something huge as a growout, probably like 150 gallons, and around 300 or more gallons per adult.
 

david1978

Member
You have done research on this? It's almost impossible for the average hobbiest to do since your dealing with such large fish. The commercial breeders also inject them with hormones to up their results but still find it very difficult. Most you see on the market are wild caught.
 
  • Thread Starter

trash.binh91

Member
david1978 said:
You have done research on this? It's almost impossible for the average hobbiest to do since your dealing with such large fish. The commercial breeders also inject them with hormones to up their results but still find it very difficult. Most you see on the market are wild caught.
I want to breed so that I can release into the wild in Asia to help the dwindling population. I thought about maybe a system of several 10,000 gal pools for breeding. But this is gonna take time and money.
 

AquaticJ

Member
But aren’t you in Dayton?
 
  • Thread Starter

trash.binh91

Member
AquaticJ said:
But aren’t you in Dayton?
I can move, I'm only thirteen, this is progressing towards adult life.

Also, teaming up with conservation groups can be nice, you can probably send fish there and they can release them.
 

david1978

Member
Dought it since most conservationists are really against releasing captive bred fish into the wild.
 
  • Thread Starter

trash.binh91

Member
david1978 said:
Dought it since most conservationists are really against releasing captive bred fish into the wild.
Gotta point there.
 

david1978

Member
The biggest thing that can be done would be to try to educate people on why these fish as well as some others shouldn't be in the aquarium trade Less people would buy them so demand would go down so they would catch fewer. Next would be environmental help to keep their natural habitit safe and let them take it from there. A good example is oxlotol, one group actually got a permit to restock an area with them but when they visited the area they found it unfit so all their work was for nothing.

I don't mean to try to shoot down your dreams but just being a realist.
 

Dch48

Member
They farm them in Thailand and sell the meat under the name Swai. If you see SwaI filets in Walmart, that's what they are. They are a form of catfish and the filets are actually pretty good.
 

Redshark1

Member
Its the natural habitats that need protecting and conserving. There is no future for a species living in captivity.
 
  • Moderator

Coradee

Moderator
Member
If it’s the species I’m thinking of they’re intensively farmed for the food trade, I don’t believe it’s endangered.
We get it in our supermarkets here as Basa or sutchI fillets.
 
  • Thread Starter

trash.binh91

Member
Well, to a answer my question, 150 gallons would be appropriate, right?
 
  • Moderator

Coradee

Moderator
Member
trash.binh91 said:
Well, to a answer my question, 150 gallons would be appropriate, right?
These fish can get around 4 foot long & as they’re bred for the food trade I’d hazard a guess they must be pretty quick growers so in my opinion a 150 gallon wouldn’t be big enough.
I don’t think many people have kept them to a large size but hopefully someone who has will chime in.
 

bizaliz3

Member
I don't think fish that get 4 feet should be in the home aquarium ever. There is no tank large enough for a 4 foot fish IMO.

Also, can captive raised fish even survive in the wild in the first place?

Several "10,000 gallon pools" would be extremely expensive. So that is quite the goal you have there. You would need tons of space and lots of employees. It doesn't sound like a project a hobbiest can take on themselves. Especially if you are trying to raise them to be able to survive in the wild after being raised in captivity. There are probably many special measures that would need to be taken for them to be able to function in the wild.
 

Redshark1

Member
150 gallons is a laugh. These are skittish and will glass surf all their lives in stunted condition. When they spook they panic and go crazy harming themselves and breaking all the heaters and filters etc. Leave them be.

Further info on monsterfishkeepers. Spend an hour and you will know all.

Spend your energy and enthusiasm on conserving the only thing which will save them. Their home.

But it's tough. I've dedicated my life to saving our natural habitats and the world just wants to keep destroying itself by converting everything of value into money including the planet itself.

ID sharks theories?

Heavily stunted ID shark! HELP!
see a collection of links in post #9

ID Shark Housing

iridescent shark

ID SHARK GROWTH RATE!

1,000 gal indoor pond here!
One 1,000G Indoor Monsterfish Pond Coming Up! (Ghetto Style)
 
  • Thread Starter

trash.binh91

Member
I meant 150 gallons to grow them out, not to have them live their lives, that.... is crazy.
 

Redshark1

Member
A quote you will read on monsterfishkeepers "I bought two 1.5" ids and they grew to 26" in less than 2 yrs in a 750g tank. They are a good example of a fish that will stunt easily if not given proper conditions."

ID sharks theories?
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Why do you want to breed them btw.
There is no trade (beside consumption)
 

Latest threads

Top Bottom