Iodine Free Salt V.s Aquarium Salt

OneLittleBubble

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One of my comet goldfish in a pond has developed some redness near his gill and some on his fins and body. I'm not sure if this is from bad water quality so I am now doing daily water changes, however, if this is some infection or parasite can I just use normal iodine free salt or does it have to be aquarium salt? Is there any difference like the aquarium salt is more beneficial for the fish or something?
 

Gypsy13

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The salt has to be pure sodium chloride with no other ingredients. Some table salt has anti caking agents etc. Aquarium salt is safe to use in ponds with goldfish. Water conditions are most important. If you add salt, remember it doesn’t evaporate so if you keep adding without removing you’re going to have a big problem. Also salt can be hard on plants. And snails of course. Follow the dosing instructions. Mix to dissolve completely before adding. Hope this helps.
 

chromedome52

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I always had Instant Ocean mix made up in a barrel to use for my brine shrimp hatchers, so adding dissolved salts was pretty easy. It was more expensive than Kosher or Canning salt, both of which I have also used, but I think the additional mineral content of sea salt mix is beneficial. I know it was for hatching brine shrimp, I always got much better hatches with the good stuff.

Kosher and Canning salt are good because the finer size of the granules allows for faster dissolving. Never had any problem with anti-caking agents. Rock Salt, which is what "aquarium" salt actually is, is not pure at all.
 

Gypsy13

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chromedome52 said:
I always had Instant Ocean mix made up in a barrel to use for my brine shrimp hatchers, so adding dissolved salts was pretty easy. It was more expensive than Kosher or Canning salt, both of which I have also used, but I think the additional mineral content of sea salt mix is beneficial. I know it was for hatching brine shrimp, I always got much better hatches with the good stuff.

Kosher and Canning salt are good because the finer size of the granules allows for faster dissolving. Never had any problem with anti-caking agents. Rock Salt, which is what "aquarium" salt actually is, is not pure at all.
I beg to disagree on the aquarium salt. It’s in large crystal form such as rock salt. Rock salt has impurities in it. Aquarium salt doe not.
 

chromedome52

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Aquarium salt is Rock salt that was put in a box that says "Aquarium Salt" on it. They do sift it for smaller crystals, but it is still the same.
 

Gypsy13

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Funny, my rock salt says it is sodium chloride with impurities such as borates and sulphate. It also says not for food use and not to be used as bath salts. If I can’t soak my feet in it, I’m not putting my fish in it. Aquarium salt, at least the API brand, is pure sodium chloride. At least it was when I could still see. I don’t think they’ve changed.
 
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