10 Gallon Tank Introduction of new fish

omordn

Hi everyone,

I have been in the freshwater aquarium hobby for quite a few years. For the past few years I've mostly maintained a 10g planted aquarium with some nerite snails. To give a little bit of context I had a Betta in the 10g but after half a year to a year he passed away. Prior to the Betta and after the Betta I took a break from having fish in the tank. So, fast forward to 2 weeks ago I decided to introduce 5 male guppies into my established tank. This kind of leads as to why I am here...

Within a week of introducing the guppies I have now lost 3 of them. They all looked healthy and below is an overview as to how I normally introduce fish into my aquarium:
  1. I float the bag where the fish are transported in for 20 minutes to allow the fish to adjust to the temperature of my tank
  2. After 10 minutes, I add around 5 ml of my tank water into the bag
  3. I repeat step 2 for the next hour to hour and a half
  4. Once I feel that the fish have acclimated well enough I go ahead and capture them with my net and add them into my tank
  5. I dispose of the old, dirty water
This process has worked with me in the past, but I have noticed that the past instances in where I've tried introducing fish into my tank they are not lasting as long. I observe the fish daily and make sure that all equipment is running correctly and there are no issues with them, etc. I also have my light on a timer. And, I feed the fish once a day for 6 days and fast them on the 7th day which is the day I normally perform a water change.

The only thing I can think of as to why I am having problems having fish survive longer is that I am purchasing these fish from a LFS compared to in the past. This is probably the only thing that has changed that I can think of. Perhaps my LFS is not purchasing live stock from a reputable source and these fish come with some sort of internal health implications that normally you cannot see right away.

Anyway, I'm hoping to understand 1) Whether perhaps the issue is with my process and if so, what do I need to change and 2) Get an idea as to what y'all do when introducing fish that lasts longer than what I've been experiencing.

My current tank setup:
  • 10g tank
  • 78-82 F temp
  • Assorted annubia plants
  • Weekly water changes
  • 0 ppm ammonia, 0 ppm nitrite, 10 ppm nitrates, and 6.4 pH
Thanks.
 

StarGirl

Have you checked what the LFS pH level is compared to yours? Do you have a test kit for the KH and GH? Guppies like harder water. Im just asking because that is what stuck out to me. Also guppies in stores now a days seem to be pretty hit or miss.

The way you are acclimating them is what I do.
 
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omordn

Have you checked what the LFS pH level is compared to yours? Do you have a test kit for the KH and GH? Guppies like harder water. Im just asking because that is what stuck out to me. Also guppies in stores now a days seem to be pretty hit or miss.

They way you are acclimating them is what I do.
Hmm.... this is a great question that I didn't think about (regarding pH). I do have a test kit of KH and GH. I'll go test the water for these and respond back with what it came back with.
 
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FrenchFry

I have had similar experience with my guppies, I started with 5 and within about a month 2 were dead, while the other 3 are alive to this day (around 4 months later I believe) and still going strong. I also got them at a local fish store. I did notice the difference in the body types in the ones that survived and the ones that didn't. The ones that are still alive were kind of more well rounded and... stocky/muscular than the ones that died, they were kind of skinny, small, and scrawly. Maybe that is why? I'm not sure. Sorry if I wasn't much help!
 
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omordn

I have had similar experience with my guppies, I started with 5 and within about a month 2 were dead, while the other 3 are alive to this day (around 4 months later I believe) and still going strong. I also got them at a local fish store. I did notice the difference in the body types in the ones that survived and the ones that didn't. The ones that are still alive were kind of more well rounded and... stocky/muscular than the ones that died, they were kind of skinny, small, and scrawly. Maybe that is why? I'm not sure. Sorry if I wasn't much help!
Yeah, thanks. The fish I lost were a good size and looked pretty strong.
Have you checked what the LFS pH level is compared to yours? Do you have a test kit for the KH and GH? Guppies like harder water. Im just asking because that is what stuck out to me. Also guppies in stores now a days seem to be pretty hit or miss.

The way you are acclimating them is what I do.
Yeah... I think you're spot on with the pH level. I don't think my water is hard enough for proper Guppy care. Shoot, I should have looked into this before getting the guppies. Feel bad.

I went ahead and did the GH and KH test and here are the results: 1-2 drops for GH and 1-2 drops for KH.
 
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Mark2002

My skills are:
1. Put the bag in the water for any length of time (Of course not too short, but in Summer and Winter the time should be longer because of a larger temperature difference)

2. Put the fish in a bucket or a small cup, with not too much water (Lesser Water as possible to decrease the time to acclimate)

3. Find a measuring cup, add some aquarium water that with roughly same amount of volume same as the bag water in the bucket/cup. Add a kitchen tissue to the cup and let it absorbs the water.

4. Looking for a drop of water sticks in the bucket that is 2 times height of the water depth. So that I can acclimate the fish until the water in the bucket and the tank water in the measuring cup will be 1:1 (I use 1:1 because that is mostly enough. If you tank's parameter is not great than your fishes will die even you acclimate very smooth [Acclimate with much more water or adding water very slowly])

5. Start adding water to the bucket: the kitchen tissue sticks in the top of the bucket and water leaking from the measuring cup. This is for not panicking the fish and the acclimation will be smoother. Adjusting the measuring cup to make the water leak faster if you want. Once your hand is tired or adding enough water (Don't keep adding water, take a break is both good for you and your fish), you can take a break. Lastly, once you ensure you have 1:1 bag water/tank water mixed in the bucket (2 times the water depth of the initial depth), you can stop. Then add the fish to the tank with a aquarium net. The fish should come out by itself as possible.
 
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Noroomforshoe

A guy at the LFS told me not to buy the guppies, he said the guppies are inbred and they keep getting complaints of dead fish. I bought some anyway, thought I could keep them alive, but they died off pretty quickly.
Livebearers thrive at a ph of 7.5 or higher. It could not have helped that you have a lower Ph.
 
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