Indoor basement pond setup? Help 

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TeaandTomatoes602

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Hi y’all!
I’m very new to ponds so I was wondering what y’all recommend when starting a brand new set up in an unfinished basement. I’m familiar with the filtration one would need and I’m probably going to go with a Rubbermaid tub or kiddy pool set up. (Probably 100-300 gal) I finally have permission to rehome my old little goldie and I’m just ecstatic!!!
The biggest thing I’m worried about is heating, as our basement is very cold even in the summer, and can get below freezing in the winter. My Goldie is definitely not used to these kind of temperatures (he’s used to a consistent 66-70 degrees). What would you guys recommend? Any advice for this setup?
Thanks!!!
 

saltwater60

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Gold fish unless it’s a fancy split tailed should be fine as long as there is air holes and it doesn’t freeze solid.
kiddy pool won’t hold up long term. Get a rubber made tote for agricultural uses and it will hold up for years.
 
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TeaandTomatoes602

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Okay! I just don’t know if it’ll be okay for him since he’s older (he’s 17) and has never been in waters that cold. I’d really like to keep it at a more consistent temp year round
 

Jimmie93

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Do not use a pool those are not made to last if you want something long term get a hard plastic tub.
 

saltwater60

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TeaandTomatoes602 said:
Okay! I just don’t know if it’ll be okay for him since he’s older (he’s 17) and has never been in waters that cold. I’d really like to keep it at a more consistent temp year round
Heating it will cost you a fortune. I’m guessing he will be fine as long as temp changes are slow.
 

Osse

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Build a frame, fill it with spray foam insulation, put the pond in before it sets. That's my plan, once I figure out a way to control humidity...
 

saltwater60

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Osse said:
Build a frame, fill it with spray foam insulation, put the pond in before it sets. That's my plan, once I figure out a way to control humidity...
Spray foam is not a good choice for preformed pond liners and I do t see this working. Spray foam rapidly expands and does so very unevenly. You’ll have no way to keep the pond from flexing, leaving voids under the liner, or possibly cracking or lifting the liner out of place during this process. You’ll have no way of ever getting the pond out of it cracks, spray foam is horribly expensive, and you’ll need plenty of cans of it.

What I recommend doing is building a box out of wood and using a EPDM liner and some sort of underlayment.
Or use these. They are about a dollar per gallon and can be moved, used for something else, or resold if you don’t like the pond. They come in 50-300 gallon sizes.
Rubbermaid Commercial 150 gal. Stock Tank For Livestock - Ace Hardware
 
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TeaandTomatoes602

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I was planning on going with the Rubbermaid stock tank any but do you think it would be a good idea to build a larger box around it and fill that with insulation foam? (The roll stuff) as well as an insulated top w/ air holes? Would that keep it warm with a heater?
 

saltwater60

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TeaandTomatoes602 said:
I was planning on going with the Rubbermaid stock tank any but do you think it would be a good idea to build a larger box around it and fill that with insulation foam? (The roll stuff) as well as an insulated top w/ air holes? Would that keep it warm with a heater?
That could help. Is your basement dry? If not you’ll likely get mold in that insulation. Plastic is a fairly good insulator and the rubber made totes are fairly thick. A cover over the top would likely help too.
 
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TeaandTomatoes602

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saltwater60 said:
That could help. Is your basement dry? If not you’ll likely get mold in that insulation. Plastic is a fairly good insulator and the rubber made totes are fairly thick. A cover over the top would likely help too.
It’s pretty wet unfortunately it actually floods sometimes :/ (only about an inch of water but still). I’m gonna probably go with a strong heater and a top and experiment a bit while it’s cycling to see if it can maintain a consistentish temperature
 

saltwater60

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TeaandTomatoes602 said:
It’s pretty wet unfortunately it actually floods sometimes :/ (only about an inch of water but still). I’m gonna probably go with a strong heater and a top and experiment a bit while it’s cycling to see if it can maintain a consistentish temperature
I would stay away from insulation then.
Just make sure you get good surface agitation so it’s doesn’t freeze over if the heater fails.
 
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