Increasing Heat Day 2 Of Ich Treatment?

Fish_Tails

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Hi there,

I'm fairly new here and to the hobby. And my betta has ich

I have a 5.5 gallon with a preset heater at 79.

Max was going downhill fast and I couldn't get my hands on a 50 watt adjustable until today, so I treated him with meds. That was Wednesday night, almost 48hrs ago.

I treated with API super ick cure. I knowit was the only thing I could get my hands on.

I now have an adjustable heater, a water stone and IAL.

Questions:
1. Will switching out the heaters at this point be beneficial or casuse too much stress?

2. I have a mini-hang on filter which is running. If I don't increase heat sould I still use the waterstone?

2. Should I give him the 2nd dose? The directions say to give him another dose tonight, but it's my understanding that Betta's are super sensitive to meds.

Thanks for reading smart fish people!
Advice is out of this world appreciated.
 

LeviS

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My rams had ich. My temperature in the tank is at 80 degrees. I didn’t use meds, had good aeration, and did 2 water changes in a week and it cleared up quickly. Maybe someone with Bettas can give their experience.
 

DarkOne

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You don't need to raise the temp when using meds. I use and like Super Ick Cure a lot and works very well for me. Follow the directions exactly.

80°F only speeds up the lifecycle of Ich and nothing more. The cysts that are visible on fish is only 1 of 4 stages of Ich lifecycle so you still have Ich in your tank. They will attach to the gills and can kill your fish if not treated properly.

The water change recommendation is to pick up the Ich in the other stages (tomonts, tromites and theronts) that are in the water column. You should gravel vac every day for 2 weeks when using the heat method.

Ich stops attaching to fish at 85°F, stops reproducing at 86°F and dies at 88.5°F (5 consecutive days). These are exact temps and most thermometers are +/- 2°F so if you're using heat, it's recommended to go to 88°F for 2 weeks to be effective and you need good water flow throughout your tank so the temp is even. You also need an air stone as warmer water holds less oxygen.
 
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Fish_Tails

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You don't need to raise the temp when using meds. I use and like Super Ick Cure a lot and works very well for me. Follow the directions exactly.

80°F only speeds up the lifecycle of Ich and nothing more. The cysts that are visible on fish is only 1 of 4 stages of Ich lifecycle so you still have Ich in your tank. They will attach to the gills and can kill your fish if not treated properly.

The water change recommendation is to pick up the Ich in the other stages (tomonts, tromites and theronts) that are in the water column. You should gravel vac every day for 2 weeks when using the heat method.

Ich stops attaching to fish at 85°F, stops reproducing at 86°F and dies at 88.5°F (5 consecutive days). These are exact temps and most thermometers are +/- 2°F so if you're using heat, it's recommended to go to 88°F for 2 weeks to be effective and you need good water flow throughout your tank so the temp is even. You also need an air stone as warmer water holds less oxygen.
Thank DarkOne,

I don't want to jinx it but Max seems to be getting better!

Ok, to summarize - follow the medication's instructions to the T. Upon first water change post-treatment it suggest 25%. And of course to place carbon in the filter as well.

I usually do water changes once a week maybe more if my nitrates start rising. Post medication, should I vac every day for two weeks and do more frequent water changes?

I would.love to just nuke the subsrate but my fiance threw away ALL the medium in my filter!!!!!! So now I fear w/out the substrate my tank will completely crash!

Appriciative newbie here!! Thanks for the knowledge.
 

THRESHER

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Good bacteria is held in the filter media, not the substrate. If your fiance tossed out the filter media, then you're in trouble. You'll need to quick cycle the tank. Add new media to filter and get some quickly to restart your cycle.
 
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Fish_Tails

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Good bacteria is held in the filter media, not the substrate. If your fiance tossed out the filter media, then you're in trouble. You'll need to quick cycle the tank. Add new media to filter and get some quickly to restart your cycle.
Yeah, I had an internal fit of rage when I saw it missing from the filter. Lol

Thanks for the recommendations.
 

DarkOne

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Good bacteria is held in the filter media, not the substrate. If your fiance tossed out the filter media, then you're in trouble. You'll need to quick cycle the tank. Add new media to filter and get some quickly to restart your cycle.
Not really. There is a ton of BB in substrate as well as in bio media and every surface that touches the water. Think of the surface area of each grain of the substrate. If you're not overstocked, one or the other will process the ammonia and nitrites and will grow enough to not have a mini cycle.

When I start a new QT, I grab a handful of gravel from a well established tank as well as cycled media (usually a sponge filter) when I go overboard and buy a ton of fish at once. The BB on the gravel makes a big difference in my QT. My last haul was 33 fish (pygmy cories, CPDS and ember tetras) and no ammonia or nitrites in the 10g tank.

If the gravel is deep enough and left alone long enough (6mos or more), anaerobic bacteria will grow to process nitrates too.
 

DarkOne

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Post medication, should I vac every day for two weeks and do more frequent water changes?
No. That is part of the treatment when you're just using heat. The meds break down the cell walls of Ich and kill them in the water column. The only time Ich is vulnerable is when it's outside of the cyst (white dots on the fish).

I usually do a 50% water change after using meds of any kind.
 

THRESHER

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Not really. There is a ton of BB in substrate as well as in bio media and every surface that touches the water. Think of the surface area of each grain of the substrate. If you're not overstocked, one or the other will process the ammonia and nitrites and will grow enough to not have a mini cycle.

When I start a new QT, I grab a handful of gravel from a well established tank as well as cycled media (usually a sponge filter) when I go overboard and buy a ton of fish at once. The BB on the gravel makes a big difference in my QT. My last haul was 33 fish (pygmy cories, CPDS and ember tetras) and no ammonia or nitrites in the 10g tank.

If the gravel is deep enough and left alone long enough (6mos or more), anaerobic bacteria will grow to process nitrates too.
Hmm, i was under the impression substrate doesn't hold anything, and if it does it's miniscule. Unless, of course, all this time I;ve been mis-informed, lol! I do keep sponge filters running in all my tanks incase I need to start a new cycle.
 

DarkOne

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Hmm, i was under the impression substrate doesn't hold anything, and if it does it's miniscule. Unless, of course, all this time I;ve been mis-informed, lol! I do keep sponge filters running in all my tanks incase I need to start a new cycle.
It depends on the substrate. Sand and fine gravel have more surface area so it'll hold more than pea gravel but even pea gravel will have a decent amount of BB. Bio media is nothing more than objects with a lot of surface area. That's why pot scrubbers and lava rock, to name a few, work well as bio media. Sponge filters are another great example. Look at all the pores in a sponge. That's all surface area to grow BB. A lot of people think a sponge filter is a mechanical filter but it's a biological filter with an unfortunate side effect of attracting detritus. Every surface in your aquarium has BB.

Another great way to seed a new tank is to just squeeze the sponge into a cup and pour that brown soup into the new tank. All that mulm is already broken down and has BB in it.

Now you know...
 

THRESHER

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It depends on the substrate. Sand and fine gravel have more surface area so it'll hold more than pea gravel but even pea gravel will have a decent amount of BB. Bio media is nothing more than objects with a lot of surface area. That's why pot scrubbers and lava rock, to name a few, work well as bio media. Sponge filters are another great example. Look at all the pores in a sponge. That's all surface area to grow BB. A lot of people think a sponge filter is a mechanical filter but it's a biological filter with an unfortunate side effect of attracting detritus. Every surface in your aquarium has BB.

Another great way to seed a new tank is to just squeeze the sponge into a cup and pour that brown soup into the new tank. All that mulm is already broken down and has BB in it.

Now you know...
Well of course! When I seed a new tank, i squeeze all my sponge filters into a bucket so i can get that juicy brown sludgy goodness! Hasn't failed me yet! I do have sand in my tanks, but i rarely let it go past a week.I do all my water changes once a week and complete tank clean, sand vacume, etc. Filters (canisters & HOB's) i leave alone for 3-4 months. Lots of brown sludgy goodness in those!
 

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Don't clean your tank too well. Scrubbing surfaces kill BB. I just lightly swirl the gravel vac tube above the substrate to get loose detritus and only scrape/clean the front glass so I can see my fish. Canisters are usually cleaned every 4-8 weeks.

Floating plants are also great for new tanks. Java moss, guppy grass and anacharis grow like weeds in my tanks and help new QT setups.
 
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Fish_Tails

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Hey @DarkOne @THRESHER

Update: Max is doing great (knock on wood).
Thanks for your help!!

48 hrs after the last dose I tested the water before changing it. Ammonia .25 barely, nitrates around 10ppm.

Used Prime as my conditioner.

24 hrs tested again, 0 ammonia, notrates 10.

Tonight I did another 25% change.

I haven't been vacuuming the substrate bc it's where the majority of my good bacteria is residing.
 

THRESHER

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Hey @DarkOne @THRESHER

Update: Max is doing great (knock on wood).
Thanks for your help!!

48 hrs after the last dose I tested the water before changing it. Ammonia .25 barely, nitrates around 10ppm.

Used Prime as my conditioner.

24 hrs tested again, 0 ammonia, notrates 10.

Tonight I did another 25% change.

I haven't been vacuuming the substrate bc it's where the majority of my good bacteria is residing.

That's awesome! If Max made it this far, he'll pull through with flying colors!!
 
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