In need of a comparable bottom feeder

  1. Pineapples95 Initiate Member

    Hello everyone! Im still a noobie to this site, but you guys have all taught me SOOO much i figured you guys could help me with this little problem.. So my fish tank (2.5 gal) with a male better, and female ADF has reached the point where the rocks are growing algae and the 2 nerite snails are so busy riding on each other back.. in one place.. that they aren't even putting a dent into cleaning the tank.. except for the glass, when they feel like it. Im looking for a bottom feeder like a cory or a place or something that will help solve the algae problem on the gravel, I am planning to put the snails into another much larger tank so they can do their thing where their services are less required.
    I heard plecos are fairly territorial and can attack ADF, and corys can hurt themselves on the gravel.. Ive tried several ghost shrimp, but within the hour i find them dead in front of the ADF in her little cave.. I want to get the algae problem under control early before it turns into a big problem.. if it helps, the algae seems to be red/orange.. I think its red because i have white rocks.. I do dose with sachem excel everyday, but it has done nothing except maybe slow the growth down.. and I know the algae came in on one of the plants i have in there because that plant is covered with it.. I.m hoping the bottom feeder won't get too big for the tank, and from what i understand fish don't usually outgrow their tank, and since bettas and ADF put off such small bloods, i assumed adding a clean up crew wouldn't be too big a load on the filter (which is intended for 2-5 gal tanks, its a tetra whisper, and came with another tank I had)
     
  2. littleredridingmech Member Member

    I wouldn't put any bottom feeders in that tank, none are small enough to stay happy, cories are carnivores and wouldn't do anything for the algae and there are some stocking problems in that tank already (you can post another thread in the stocking section for help with that :) )

    Is the algae hairy or more splotchy brown? How long has the tank been set up?

    EDIT: Also, fish will absolutely grow out of their tanks. They won't grow longer than the tank is long, but they'll become stunted and either have serious health problems or die.
     

  3. Daniel W Member Member

    You couldn't have had a pleco or a cory in the first place, a 2.5 gallon is WAY to small for both of them. Why not try removing the algae off yourself?
     

  4. Pineapples95 Initiate Member

    They seem very happy together no problems.

    I would, but that would only send the algae into the water to later land on another surface and start spreading there too.
    I need something to completely remove the algae.

    It's like cleaning the algae off your plants, yeah you can keep doing it, but in a week the plant will start growing algae again.

    And it's been setup for about 3 months now, and I read this one day and I kinda took to it about stocking.. It's uncomfortable for the fish to live in smaller spaces than their natural habitats, but it's not harmful. The betta used to only know that little cup at the store and the adf was in a small tank at the store it got it from too, crowded with about 10 others, and about 20 various types of tetras...
    From what they came from, this tank is a nice home I believe.

    I mean, I haven't had any problems with ammonia, nitrites or nitrates, and they swim with each other and I often find them together in the ADFs cave together just relaxing. If I didn't know any better they're like best friends.
    The only problem I've had is when it comes feeding time and the frog accidentally bit the betas tail mistaking it for a live worm, the betta learned quick and stays clear of her when it's feeding time, other than that they seem happy together.
     

  5. Bithimala Well Known Member Member

    Agreed, I don't think there are really any algae eaters that would do well in a tank that small. What's your lighting schedule? I would try reducing the lighting in the tank first.

    You could do some other shrimp like RCS, but I can't guarantee they would survive the frog and betta, making them a rather expensive snack.

    Fish not outgrowing their tanks is akin to the old Japanese foot binding. Basically, the growth is stunted and deformed as they attempt to survive and grow in a restrictive area, which as mentioned, can lead to numerous health problems and shortened life spans.
     
  6. Pineapples95 Initiate Member

    Alright that's a noted lesson, fish do need their growth room.
    And okay.. I guess I'll just leave the snails in there to clean the glass, maybe up the dose on the seachem flourish excel.
    The lighting is about 8 hours a day, sometimes 10 depending on how long I'm at work for. I kept it at 8 hours instead of 10-12 literally to prevent algae from appearing -...-
     
  7. Bithimala Well Known Member Member

    Maybe try a blackout for a couple days and see if that helps. I've personally never done that for my tanks, so I don't know how it would impact the plants...
     
  8. Pineapples95 Initiate Member

    I'm scared to do that with my plants.. I have 2 plants in there that were very hard to come across.. And my other two tanks are cycling right now..
    A tiger lotus and a banana plant.. I almost lost the tiger lotus during the cycling of the other tank, and lost 2 other species of plants.. Maybe when it's done cycling I'll move the plants over and try the black out.. Never actually thought about that haha
     
  9. littleredridingmech Member Member

    You could try getting a timer for the light? Sometimes algae thrives on an inconsistent photoperiod. You don't need the expensive ones for aquariums, I got a basic one from a hardware store for $4 that works just fine.
     
  10. Pineapples95 Initiate Member

    I'll have to go grab one.