In-fish Cycling W/betta, Old Filter Media, Gravel, & Decorations - Ammonia High

vergolocities
  • #1
Hey there! Just made an account on this fourm; I'll be setting my profile and introduction soon enough! However. I'm in a bit of a pinch, and in need of advice soon.

I was given a fish tank (owner was moving and needed a new caretaker for their Betta) with already established filter media, alongside gravel and other items inside. Items were kept moist with old tank water, and quickly setup. I should mention that minus the water used for the item's travel, all the water I put into the tank was new. From the tap and conditioned immediately.
However, I'm facing one issue: Ammonia for tank is at .50ppm-1.00ppm.
(Tests were done with the liquid version of the API water parameters test kit. Nitrite is .00ppm, pH is 7.4, and Nitrate is .00ppm these were all matched and confirmed to be the same with water in the jar my Betta is residing in, alongside the tank water. Water in jar is also at .00ppm for ammonia)

Unsurprisingly, that alarmed me. I've done frequent water changes through out the day to help with this, applied proper water conditioners (Also applied a portion of API: Instant Cycle to help give the beneficial bacteria in the tank a helping hand. And since BB apparently needs to be fed, I tossed a few of his pellets inside the tank to break up & be used. There's also some old poopoo in his gravel so I assume that'll help as well )

The other problem is that my Betta, alongside their Marmio Moss, is still inside their jar due to my concern of the ammonia harming them. It's just normal-sized Mason jar, but I'd like to get him out of there ASAP as it's obvious he's stressed in such the confined space, but I can't move him into the tank with such high ammonia without there possibly (?) being an issue. He's also 3 years old, adding more concern of his immune system being even more sensitive to such a high content of ammonia.

So at this point, I feel as though this looks like I need to do in-fish cycling. I can't realistically leave Tuna, my betta, inside their jar for a long enough time for a cycle to occur. I only have about a day until he'd poop himself out of house and home in there. But I can't just put him into a tank with such high ammonia. What can be done to bring down the levels of this water immediately, and how soon can I introduce Tuna into his tank? Will the ammonia go down overnight, or should I immediately put him in his tank and just do frequent water changes? This is a bit of a time-sensitive problem, so replies as soon as you can give them is more than welcome.
 
BReefer97
  • #2
How big is the tank? I would do a large water change and add the betta fish. Do a fish in cycle. He’s probably producing more ammonia that’s slowly building up in the jar - the tank will allow the ammonia he produces to dilute easier since there’s more water to do so. A drop of poison in a jar is deadlier than a drop of poison in say a 5 gallon tank.

Also, try using Seachem Prime as your water conditioner. It detoxifies ammonia for up to 24 hours. And another thing - did you add the two water straight to your tank and THEN condition it? That may have caused your problem and killed your cycle. Untreated tap water should never touch your filter media because it kills the beneficial bacteria. Treat the water before you add it to your tank.
 
RainBetta
  • #3
The high ammonia could be part of your tap, or the filter media was overloaded.

I'd do another water change, only 50% though. Clean the gravel well, make sure there's no poops left, or pellets. Make sure the aeration in the tank is very high. This can remove ammonia. Clean Tuna's jars little for now. Is there any larger container that you can put him and his water in for a longer period of time? You could always add a little bit of new water to his potential larger container to fill it up. Other than that, the ammonia is too high to put him in for now. I'm sorry I can't help you that much, but I'm pretty confused.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Thank you for getting back to me! Tank size is 5.5 Gal., the primer used is Tetra AquaSafe for Bettas, and below I've attached a photo of my ammonia levels in the tank as of now. On the right is the jar's ppm, and on the left is my tank's. (Flash behind a piece of paper used to better view it)

I'll look into Seachem Primer! It doesn't fully remove ammonia but just neutralizes the effects flr awhile, which I assume must be good for rebuilding the nitrogen cycle.

Water added into tank was put with primer and stirred pretty aggressively before getting to tank. Even ammonia tested my tap water, which had .0ppm of ammonia in it as well (Just a very high pH though).

I'll do a 50% water change now and check through the gravel for any remaining poop. Fingers crossed it goes down to a safe enough level!
 

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vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
As for Tuna in his jar, I'll change out some of his water to freshen it up a little. I'll be taking a sample of my water to a LFS to see if they have any thoughts on it as well.
 
RainBetta
  • #6
Possibly the ammonia came from the gravel. Did you clean it before setting up the tank? If you put it directly in, maybe the poop and food stirred up and got into the water, whereas in the old tank it settled to the bottom/below gravel
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
I put it directly into the tank, so that could be it! Should I push my gravel vac through it to get any excess waste out?

Just noticed something very odd. Like mentioned before, I took water straight from my tap and it tested with no ammonia. Just now I did a test on a bucket of water I just filled up and added Tetra's prime to, and did a water test to be safe. Ammonia at 0.25ppm, neon green?
Is this normal because of a chemical in water primer when newly added, or should I avoid tap and buy a jug of aquariam water?
EDIT: Water is also warmer than the tank's if it makes a difference. Haven't poured the water into the tank yet either.
 
Dch48
  • #8
Hey there! Just made an account on this fourm; I'll be setting my profile and introduction soon enough! However. I'm in a bit of a pinch, and in need of advice soon.

I was given a fish tank (owner was moving and needed a new caretaker for their Betta) with already established filter media, alongside gravel and other items inside. Items were kept moist with old tank water, and quickly setup. I should mention that minus the water used for the item's travel, all the water I put into the tank was new. From the tap and conditioned immediately.
However, I'm facing one issue: Ammonia for tank is at .50ppm-1.00ppm.
(Tests were done with the liquid version of the API water parameters test kit. Nitrite is .00ppm, pH is 7.4, and Nitrate is .00ppm these were all matched and confirmed to be the same with water in the jar my Betta is residing in, alongside the tank water. Water in jar is also at .00ppm for ammonia)

Unsurprisingly, that alarmed me. I've done frequent water changes through out the day to help with this, applied proper water conditioners (Also applied a portion of API: Instant Cycle to help give the beneficial bacteria in the tank a helping hand. And since BB apparently needs to be fed, I tossed a few of his pellets inside the tank to break up & be used. There's also some old poopoo in his gravel so I assume that'll help as well )

The other problem is that my Betta, alongside their Marmio Moss, is still inside their jar due to my concern of the ammonia harming them. It's just normal-sized Mason jar, but I'd like to get him out of there ASAP as it's obvious he's stressed in such the confined space, but I can't move him into the tank with such high ammonia without there possibly (?) being an issue. He's also 3 years old, adding more concern of his immune system being even more sensitive to such a high content of ammonia.

So at this point, I feel as though this looks like I need to do in-fish cycling. I can't realistically leave Tuna, my betta, inside their jar for a long enough time for a cycle to occur. I only have about a day until he'd poop himself out of house and home in there. But I can't just put him into a tank with such high ammonia. What can be done to bring down the levels of this water immediately, and how soon can I introduce Tuna into his tank? Will the ammonia go down overnight, or should I immediately put him in his tank and just do frequent water changes? This is a bit of a time-sensitive problem, so replies as soon as you can give them is more than welcome.
Actually , ammonia readings of 0.5 to 1.0 are not dangerously high unless your pH is like 7.8 or higher. I did a fish in cycle with my Betta with a pH of 7.4. The ammonia never went over 1.0 and the fish never showed any ill effects. At your pH level, less than 5% of whatever ammonia you have is of the toxic variety. Many people overestimate the danger of ammonia in a fresh water tank with their typically lower pH values. At a pH of 7.0, even 4.0 ppm is not dangerous. In saltwater where the pH usually starts at 8.0, you never want to see any ammonia because even trace amounts can be dangerous. I would say you can put the fish in the tank and add something like Tetra Safe Start to speed up the cycling process. If you can lower the pH, so much the better.
I did use Tetra Correct pH when I first started the tank and that lowers or raises the pH to right about 7.0 which is great for a new cycling tank.

Prime is known to give a false ammonia reading right after using it.

The readings shown in your picture are nothing to worry about.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Actually , ammonia readings of 0.5 to 1.0 are not dangerously high unless your pH is like 7.8 or higher. I did a fish in cycle with my Betta with a pH of 7.4. The ammonia never went over 1.0 and the fish never showed any ill effects. At your pH level, less than 5% of whatever ammonia you have is of the toxic variety. Many people overestimate the danger of ammonia in a fresh water tank with their typically lower pH values. At a pH of 7.0, even 4.0 ppm is not dangerous. In saltwater where the pH usually starts at 8.0, you never want to see any ammonia because even trace amounts can be dangerous. I would say you can put the fish in the tank and add something like Tetra Safe Start to speed up the cycling process. If you can lower the pH, so much the better.
I did use Tetra Correct pH when I first started the tank and that lowers or raises the pH to right about 7.0 which is great for a new cycling tank.

Prime is known to give a false ammonia reading right after using it.

The readings shown in your picture are nothing to worry about.





I see! my pH is 7.4 for the tank, but as the jar is also the same I assume it wouldn't shock him as maintaining the same pH is better than trying to aI'm for a solid 7.0 (Or so I've read. Correct me if I'm wrong)

The items I have with me are:

-API pH Down and Up
-API Quickstart

Would the API brand work just like Tetra Safe Start? If so, I'm thinking I can add it & the new tank water, let it acclimate to a lower temp, and add my Betta & Marmio to the tank. I will, however, keep the water in the jar in standby in case ammonia levels still stay high and/or he shows signs of discomfort.


EDIT: I should add on my Betta is 3 years old. Will he be able to withstand being in the tank with ammonia still present, or should I be even more concerned because of his age?
 
Dch48
  • #10
The Quickstart is supposed to do the same thing as Tetra Safe Start but I have never tried it. I can say with certainty that the TSS does work however.
 
MrsMontoya
  • #11
I love using seachem stability. It has all 3 types of bacteria and despite what people say, it DOES have a shelf life. I've never gotten odd readings out of it. Just recently started a fishless cycle on a shrimp tank I'm setting up and it stalled in the nitrite phase, testing 0 ammonia, high in nitrites and with 5 ppm nitrates. I did a small (10%) water change and added an additional dose of stability and it cycled within 24 hours. Usually doesn't take me longer than a day or two. That last one stalled though because there was a couple days I forgot to add the dose to the tank. Even so, one dose that day and it was done the next! Hope you can get it down!
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
Tests for pH and Ammonia attached

On Left - Water that Betta is inside
On Right - Water inside tank after water change w/primer and QuickStart added

Is it safe to proceed?

I love using seachem stability. It has all 3 types of bacteria and despite what people say, it DOES have a shelf life. I've never gotten odd readings out of it. Just recently started a fishless cycle on a shrimp tank I'm setting up and it stalled in the nitrite phase, testing 0 ammonia, high in nitrites and with 5 ppm nitrates. I did a small (10%) water change and added an additional dose of stability and it cycled within 24 hours. Usually doesn't take me longer than a day or two. That last one stalled though because there was a couple days I forgot to add the dose to the tank. Even so, one dose that day and it was done the next! Hope you can get it down!

Seachem seems to be known for making good products! I'll look into them for sure then, as making sure the cycle can stabilize w/o the ammonia doing damage is a big priority. Thank you!
 

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Kalyke
  • #13
With a fish like one betta, you could use bottled water for a while and do constant water changes. That is another option to the fish in cycle.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
With a fish like one betta, you could use bottled water for a while and do constant water changes. That is another option to the fish in cycle.

I see. Would water changes need to be multiple times per day or one per day-other day?
 
mattgirl
  • #15
Shelve all the products you are adding to the water right now. Get a bottle of Seachem Prime. Prime is first and foremost a water conditioner but it has the added benefit of neutralizing/binding low amounts of ammonia thus making the water safe for your fish.

Apparantly this tank was cycled. The cycle got disrupted with the move. Dormant ammonia causing detritus got stirred up in the gravel.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
Shelve all the products you are adding to the water right now. Get a bottle of Seachem Prime. Prime is first and foremost a water conditioner but it has the added benefit of neutralizing/binding low amounts of ammonia thus making the water safe for your fish.

Apparantly this tank was cycled. The cycle got disrupted with the move. Dormant ammonia causing detritus got stirred up in the gravel.

Fish store in my area is finally about to open, will do! When Seachem is added, how big of a water change should be done to introduce it, and will it then be safe to take my betta out of their jar and into their tank? And how long do you think it'd take to regulate the tank's cycle?
 
mattgirl
  • #17
Fish store in my area is finally about to open, will do! When Seachem is added, how big of a water change should be done to introduce it, and will it then be safe to take my betta out of their jar and into their tank? And how long do you think it'd take to regulate the tank's cycle?
It is hard to say how long it will take for the cycle to stabilize but as long as you keep a close eye on the perimeters your little guy should be fine so yes. as long as the ammonia is registering below one it will be safe to put him in there. The ammonia will still show up on the tests but will be rendered safe for your little guy.

As long as the ammonia stays below one just add enough Prime to treat the full volume of his tank. (about 1/2ml) If the ammonia gets to one or above do a water change to get it back below one and add enough Prime to the water you are replacing to treat the full volume of the tank.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #18
It is hard to say how long it will take for the cycle to stabilize but as long as you keep a close eye on the perimeters your little guy should be fine so yes. as long as the ammonia is registering below one it will be safe to put him in there. The ammonia will still show up on the tests but will be rendered safe for your little guy.

As long as the ammonia stays below one just add enough Prime to treat the full volume of his tank. (about 1/2ml) If the ammonia gets to one or above do a water change to get it back below one and add enough Prime to the water you are replacing to treat the full volume of the tank.

Thank you so much for the help! I'll keep looking for ways to get my pH and ammonia regulated (introducing hardy plants and almond leaves perhaps?) but I'm thankful I can at least get him out of his jar for now. One more question: By that, you mean I pour the treatment directly into the tank, right?
 
mattgirl
  • #19
Thank you so much for the help! I'll keep looking for ways to get my pH and ammonia regulated (introducing hardy plants and almond leaves perhaps?) but I'm thankful I can at least get him out of his jar for now. One more question: By that, you mean I pour the treatment directly into the tank, right?
Right, on the days that you don't have to do a water change just add the Prime directly to the tank. You could mix it in a cup of tank water first if you would be more comfortable doing it that way.

Don't worry about the PH. A stable PH is much more important than a specific number. One can never go wrong with plants in an aquarium so if I were you I would go for it. I know a lot of folks do recommend IAL but be forewarned that they may turn the water a dark tea color.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #20
Right, on the days that you don't have to do a water change just add the Prime directly to the tank. You could mix it in a cup of tank water first if you would be more comfortable doing it that way.

Don't worry about the PH. A stable PH is much more important than a specific number. One can never go wrong with plants in an aquarium so if I were you I would go for it. I know a lot of folks do recommend IAL but be forewarned that they may turn the water a dark tea color.

Prime just added into tank, 2ml to be exact, and got stirred in! Would checking ammonia before adding my Betta be a good idea, or do I acclimate him into the tank immediately & keep watch for anything concerning?

The plants at PetSmart were very old looking & too sensitive to be in the tank as it is now, so I think I'll be ordering plants online. (java fern & hornwort?) I see, I may look for an alternative then, because I already know I'll accidentally mistake the discoloration for bad water & lose sleep from being worried.
 
mattgirl
  • #21
Prime just added into tank, 2ml to be exact, and got stirred in! Would checking ammonia before adding my Betta be a good idea, or do I acclimate him into the tank immediately & keep watch for anything concerning?

The plants at PetSmart were very old looking & too sensitive to be in the tank as it is now, so I think I'll be ordering plants online. (java fern & hornwort?) I see, I may look for an alternative then, because I already know I'll accidentally mistake the discoloration for bad water & lose sleep from being worried.
2ml in 5.5 gallons of water is a bit more than necessary since it is very concentrated. It isn't going to hurt anything since Seachem does say 5X normal amount can be used in an emergency but if I were you I wouldn't add more than 1ml each time. More is not always better when it comes to our fish tanks.

Run the ammonia test and if it is still below one go ahead and move him over to his home. If it is above one do a water change to get it down before you move him.

Did he come with a heater? In case you didn't know Bettas prefer a temp of at least 79 degrees. Hopefully you have had the filter running during all this time. If so then the cycle/bacteria should be alive and well and will soon start processing these low amounts of ammonia you are seeing.

Java Fern and/or hornwort sound like good plants to start with.

Hopefully you will share a photo of your new water pet with us. We love pictures

Hopefully you haven't moved him yet...

If I were you I would do a big water change before moving him over. I read back through this thread and if I understand correctly you had already added a few things to the tank. I would try to get them back out of there with a water change before moving him.

I don't know for sure leaving them would cause a problem but why take the chance.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #22
Hopefully you haven't moved him yet...

If I were you I would do a big water change before moving him over. I read back through this thread and if I understand correctly you had already added a few things to the tank. I would try to get them back out of there with a water change before moving him.

I don't know for sure leaving them would cause a problem but why take the chance.


He hasn't been added yet! Thank you for telling me, being safer than sorry is what I'd like to aI'm for. This is still really new to me, at least with water parameter management, and I want to make sure I can give Tuna a good home.
Yes, In the water there should be portions of my old Tetra water primer and API QuickStart. Would a 50% water change with 1ml-half a ml of Prime work? (should I store my bottle of Prime in a fridge since it's living btw)

I have a heater & filter! They've been running immediately after I reesembled the tank, used filter media was added as well. I have a theometor as well. Unfortunately it's an old-school one instead of electronic for percision, but it's within the comfortable range of 78-89

Once his tank gets acclamated I'll take plenty of photos! For now, here's a photo of him in his jar when I picked him up from his old owner yesterday
 

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mattgirl
  • #23
I am so glad I caught this. Like I said it might not be a problem at all but I like to err on the safe side.

I would do a 75% water change. that should dilute the products enough. Since you added so much Prime to begin with I would just add 1 ml of Prime to the 75% new water you are replacing. Some folks may think even that is too much but it is what I would do.

I don't refrigerate my Prime. It isn't a bacteria supplement. It is simply a water conditioner with the added benefit of neutralizing low amounts of ammonia and/or nitrites. Once this cycle is back up and running thus no ammonia readings any of the many water conditioners on the market would work just as well.

For years I used Tetra AquaSafe but once I discovered Prime it is all I use and I highly recommend it while doing a fish in cycle.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #24
75% waterchange done! Alongside a very small amount of prime added. There are photos of the ammonia level attached with flash, no flash, and a comparison of the jar water. It's definitely below 1ppm, but seems like it's at .25ppm-.50ppm. Should I do another water change, or does it look like it's ready for him to hop into?

Prime seems like the best option for my tank! It's pretty effective and the bottle I got should last me awhile with how little is needed. With all these water changes, measuring out mls upon mls of product uses up more than a small bottle of AquaSafe can condition.

And I'd like to say, from the bottom of my heart, thank you so much!!! You've been so helpful and informative, I don't know where my tank and betta would be with the kindness this forum has to offer!
 

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mattgirl
  • #25
I think it is time to move him over to his forever home.

Since the PH and hopefully the temp is the same between tank and jar, acclimation should be super easy.

What I would do is use a turkey baster (a must have piece of equipment ) and remove some of the water from his jar. Remove about a baster-full and replace it with a baster full of tank water. wait about 5 minutes and do it again. Do this half a dozen times and then just pour him and his water into the tank. You may have to remove a little bit of water from the tank to accommodate the quart of water you are adding.

If you don't have a turkey baster just use anything you can to dip the water.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #26
I think it is time to move him over to his forever home.

Since the PH and hopefully the temp is the same between tank and jar, acclimation should be super easy.

What I would do is use a turkey baster (a must have piece of equipment ) and remove some of the water from his jar. Remove about a baster-full and replace it with a baster full of tank water. wait about 5 minutes and do it again. Do this half a dozen times and then just pour him and his water into the tank. You may have to remove a little bit of water from the tank to accommodate the quart of water you are adding.

If you don't have a turkey baster just use anything you can to dip the water.

Turkey basting is done, and Tuna is now in his tank!

I held his jar inside the water and let him swim out. He seemed confused at first, but after a moment or so he swam out slowly. Thank you again for the help, I'll be keeping a close eye on his tank & take a sample of water to an aquatics pet store for any opinions on what can be done with bringing balance to the cycle.

I do have some questions about moving fish in though:

-Should I just leave him alone completely until tomorrow, minus water checkups?
-I put a pellet into his water, but he didn't seemed interested in eating. Didn't try with bloodworms yet as they can be a bit messy. Is that normal?
-Every once in awhile (few minute-ish span) he'll float to the top, float back down, and spit out a bubble. Is that normal for bettas?
 
mattgirl
  • #27
This move has been pretty stressful for him so if it were me I would just turn off his light and give him time to get settled in. I wouldn't try to feed him yet. Maybe try again tomorrow afternoon but don't get too concerned if he doesn't eat right away.

It has been many many years since I have had a Betta but I don't remember seeing one do that. I would just chalk it up to stress for now though. Just try to give him a day or two of quiet time. Hopefully he will get settled in fairly quickly and will start building bubble nests.

If it would make you feel more comfortable asking the folks at the store for their opinion you should do it but Please don't let them talk you into adding this or that product to his water. Prime, clean water and time to settle in really is all he needs right now.

You have to keep in mind that they have to sell things to stay in business. Folks here on the forum have nothing to gain other than a good feeling when we are able to help someone.
 
Dch48
  • #28
Prime just added into tank, 2ml to be exact, and got stirred in! Would checking ammonia before adding my Betta be a good idea, or do I acclimate him into the tank immediately & keep watch for anything concerning?

The plants at PetSmart were very old looking & too sensitive to be in the tank as it is now, so I think I'll be ordering plants online. (java fern & hornwort?) I see, I may look for an alternative then, because I already know I'll accidentally mistake the discoloration for bad water & lose sleep from being worried.
Even though the Prime detoxifies the ammonia, you still see a reading in your tests. The API test kit registers both toxic and non-toxic ammonia. From your pictures, I would say it was safe to put your fish in. Just keep an eye on things and do a water change like every other day of about 25% until the cycle completes.

There is nothing living in Prime. There is in the quick start but even that doesn't need to be refrigerated. I wouldn't let anybody else test your water. You're doing fine.
 
vergolocities
  • Thread Starter
  • #29
This move has been pretty stressful for him so if it were me I would just turn off his light and give him time to get settled in. I wouldn't try to feed him yet. Maybe try again tomorrow afternoon but don't get too concerned if he doesn't eat right away.

It has been many many years since I have had a Betta but I don't remember seeing one do that. I would just chalk it up to stress for now though. Just try to give him a day or two of quiet time. Hopefully he will get settled in fairly quickly and will start building bubble nests.

If it would make you feel more comfortable asking the folks at the store for their opinion you should do it but Please don't let them talk you into adding this or that product to his water. Prime, clean water and time to settle in really is all he needs right now.

You have to keep in mind that they have to sell things to stay in business. Folks here on the forum have nothing to gain other than a good feeling when we are able to help someone.


I'm happy to say that his move into the tank has gone well so far! Throughout the day he's been taking naps on his plants, exploring his tank, tinkering with his marmio moss, and seems pretty interested in the . (Link to heater added)
I'll try to see if I can feed him freeze-dried bloodworms (soaked before giving) tomorrow, but if he doesn't notice/eat it, I'll scoop it out and try again in the evening/the next day.
That is a pretty good point about fish stores being mildly biast due to needing to sell products. I decided against the store and plan on continuing just using Prime, water changes, and patience. Within the next week or two I'll be introducing a 10W fluorescent light and plants (link to set I'm looking into) to help with further stabilization.

Thanks once more for all the help you've given! Heres to hoping Tuna can have a swift and comfortable tank soon enough! layful:


Even though the Prime detoxifies the ammonia, you still see a reading in your tests. The API test kit registers both toxic and non-toxic ammonia. From your pictures, I would say it was safe to put your fish in. Just keep an eye on things and do a water change like every other day of about 25% until the cycle completes.

There is nothing living in Prime. There is in the quick start but even that doesn't need to be refrigerated. I wouldn't let anybody else test your water. You're doing fine.


I see! I'll keep up the water changes & Prime treatment, and see how that goes for the next week-or so.
I'm glad to hear that! This is my first time attempting fish-keeping outside of just watching videos/learning about them as a fun past-time, so I'm doing my best to give Tuna what he needs/deserves despite my inexperience. Thank you for the help as well DCH!
 
SadieCM
  • #30
You are a great new fish parent! Welcome to the forum. Many people here are very knowledgable and I have learned SO much since getting back into the hobby a few years ago. Watch out for MTS (multiple tank syndrome)!
 
mattgirl
  • #31
I'm happy to say that his move into the tank has gone well so far! Throughout the day he's been taking naps on his plants, exploring his tank, tinkering with his marmio moss, and seems pretty interested in the . (Link to heater added)
I am thrilled to hear that he is settling in so quickly. You are doing a fantastic job with him.
I'll try to see if I can feed him freeze-dried bloodworms (soaked before giving) tomorrow, but if he doesn't notice/eat it, I'll scoop it out and try again in the evening/the next day.
I am sure you already know it but I wanted to mention that they have tiny stomachs so if the FD bloodworms are very big you may want to cut them to tiny bite size after soaking.
That is a pretty good point about fish stores being mildly biast due to needing to sell products. I decided against the store and plan on continuing just using Prime, water changes, and patience.
I feel sure there are some of them that are very knowledgeable and only want the best for the fish they sell but some are just out to sell product.
Within the next week or two I'll be introducing a 10W fluorescent light and plants (link to set I'm looking into) to help with further stabilization.
Those plants should do wonders for both the health of the tank and enjoyment for Tuna.

Thanks once more for all the help you've given! Heres to hoping Tuna can have a swift and comfortable tank soon enough! layful:
You are so very welcome. I am very happy to help.
 
Dch48
  • #32
It is hard to say how long it will take for the cycle to stabilize but as long as you keep a close eye on the perimeters your little guy should be fine so yes. as long as the ammonia is registering below one it will be safe to put him in there. The ammonia will still show up on the tests but will be rendered safe for your little guy.

As long as the ammonia stays below one just add enough Prime to treat the full volume of his tank. (about 1/2ml) If the ammonia gets to one or above do a water change to get it back below one and add enough Prime to the water you are replacing to treat the full volume of the tank.
But, the ammonia reading will be the same with the Prime or without it since the test kit measures toxic and nontoxic together.
 
Rancore
  • #33
Put him in a jar or bowl and change 100% of his water everyday until his tank is cycled
 
mattgirl
  • #34
Put him in a jar or bowl and change 100% of his water everyday until his tank is cycled
I am sorry but I can't agree with this method at all.
 
Dch48
  • #35
I am sorry but I can't agree with this method at all.
Me neither. He's better off going in the tank now.
 
Rancore
  • #36
How so? It’s called tubbing and is quite common when people don’t have cycled tanks available yet. People do it with axolotls and other larger things so I don’t see how it would be a problem for a Betta who’s grown up in those conditions. It’s only temporary while tank is cycling and pretty much guarantees no ammonia or nitrites in the water, which is a lot more safer than a fish in cycle. I’m curious as to why it’s not a good idea though.
 

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